career coaching

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A positive approach to career coaching

A positive approach to career coaching

Positive psychology is generating a substantial and growing body of credible, empirical research. The links between positive psychology and career coaching have been articulated in this paper and there are clearly contributions to both the theory and praxis of career coaching that positive psychology can make. As positive psychology continues to develop, our understanding of what constitutes a fulfilled work life, and the factors that contribute to one, will develop with it. We will benefit particularly from research that links concepts such as job satisfaction, meaning at work and work engagement to the career context and the particular issues facing our key client groups. A further focus not just on the antecedents of career well-being but on the effectiveness of specific techniques to use within a career coaching setting would be of great benefit to our clients. The potential advantages of closer academic links between the specialisms are bilateral and a century of career development theory and evidence can provide positive psychologists with a valuable springboard for their career research. For many career practitioners, the ideas contained within this paper will be old friends. Supporting clients to find meaning and fulfilment in their careers is a core ideal for most, if not all career practitioners, even if the term ‘positive psychology’ is new; but

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Understanding the experience of midlife women taking part in a work-life balance career coaching programme: an interpretative phenomenological analysis

Understanding the experience of midlife women taking part in a work-life balance career coaching programme: an interpretative phenomenological analysis

The coaching programme designed for this study is founded on Passmore’s (2010) integrated coaching model, which uses an amalgamation of coaching approaches to meet clients’ individual needs with the evidence emphasising the individual subjective nature of midlife women’s work-life balance. This model positions the coaching relationship as humanistic and is founded on the conditions conceived by psychologist Carl Rogers (Yates, 2014). This model could offer women space to explore their feelings securely whilst promoting change (Bryant-Jefferies & Joseph, 2008; Passmore, 2010). Boniwell (2007) disseminates the use of positive psychology (PP) in partnership with coaching to increase positive emotions and wellbeing and the programme delivered for this research includes two PP interventions based on this premise (Emmons & McCullough, 2003). This study therefore builds on existing research and literature by exploring how a career coaching programme focussing on midlife women’s individual values, priorities and definitions of

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Career Coaching Across the Curriculum: Enhancing the Career Competencies of the 21st Century Learner

Career Coaching Across the Curriculum: Enhancing the Career Competencies of the 21st Century Learner

One example of an initiative designed to facilitate the infusion of career education into curriculum is the pilot project Career Coaching Across the Curriculum: Integrating Career Development into Classroom Instruction currently being offered by members of the Faculty of Education at the University of Lethbridge. This pilot project involves two main components. In the first component, pre-service teachers in the Faculty of Education are given the opportunity to take an elective course entitled Career Education. In this course, they learn about the career planning process, career theorists, career counselling skills, career counselling outcomes, career assessments (informal, semi-formal, and formal), effective initiation and engagement strategies, effective decision-making strategies, effective goal-setting and preparation strategies and effective exploration and goal-implementation strategies. They also learn about the world of work in the 21 st century and how changes in the world of work impact the career planning of students. As well, they learn how to integrate career education lesson plans, unit plans and

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Career coaching tools: Evidence-based techniques for practice

Career coaching tools: Evidence-based techniques for practice

The techniques in this paper come from a wide range of theoretical traditions, including social psychology (possible selves), behavioural science (ACT), psychotherapy (art-based approaches) and positive psychology (strengths). This multi-disciplinary approach to career practice responds to an important call in the literature (Dany, 2014; Khapova & Arthur, 2011). Research into career development and into therapeutic interventions has moved on apace over the last decades, building on the understanding from the more traditional body of career theories. We are well aware that ‘career’ as our clients experience it is multi-faceted, incorporating psychological, sociological, economic and political influences so career practice which is restricted to a narrow selection of 20th century approaches may not be fit for purpose. We will serve our clients well if we can capitalise on the up to date ideas which have been generated both within our discipline and beyond to offer our clients the best support we can.

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Career conversations in coaching: the contribution that career theory can make to coaching practice

Career conversations in coaching: the contribution that career theory can make to coaching practice

This paper responds to calls for an increased evidence base for coaching practice by exploring the contribution that career research and theory could make to this field. The paper summarises three small-scale studies focusing on career change undertaken by post-graduate students enrolled on an MSc in Career Coaching at a university in London. The studies explore the experiences of three groups of people who have recently changed career direction: female black African entrepreneurs, academic research scientists moving to industry, and people choosing a career in careers. The findings of the studies highlight the role of meaning and values, and the influence of others on career choice. The studies show too how the participants wrestle with subjective notions of career success, and that the impetus to make a career change comes from both a disenchantment with one situation and an attraction towards another. The paper concludes with some suggestions for

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Understanding potential career changers’ experience of career confidence following a positive psychology based coaching programme

Understanding potential career changers’ experience of career confidence following a positive psychology based coaching programme

Changes in the labour market over the last decades have led to an increase in the number of career and job changes individuals are likely to face in their working lives. Previous literature indicates that a high level of confidence can help individuals to make career changes. This research involved five participants who took part in a coaching programme prior to changing their careers. The programme consisted of four positive psychology interventions based on a proposal of core confidence as a higher order construct composed of self-efficacy, hope, optimism and resilience. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis showed that participants perceived their career confidence before the programme as low, incorporating negative affect and self-doubt. After the programme participants demonstrated increased career engagement, self-awareness and a positive and optimistic outlook. The analysis revealed that change was effected through the development of hope, change in cognitive processes and coaching as a catalyst. Implications for the definition of career confidence, and for positive psychology and career coaching practice are considered.

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The Role and Effectiveness of Coaching in Increasing Self-Efficacy and Employability Efforts of Higher Education Students

The Role and Effectiveness of Coaching in Increasing Self-Efficacy and Employability Efforts of Higher Education Students

Coaching, as part of a universities’ employability strategy, might be a way to address students’ lack of social capital and their lack of role models. Creating opportunities for students to build social capital should become an important part of the universities’ employability agenda. This might be achieved by providing role models with whom students can identify [52]. It is also important that career services use different strategies to reach out to ethnic minority students as these students tend to underuse them [20][26]. The effectiveness of career coaching can be also increased by allocating to immigrant students career coaches who are also immigrants and who are professionally successful [45].

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COACHING LEADERSHIP

COACHING LEADERSHIP

A CEO is a trust builder with his/her followers [16]. He/she creates a safe and appropriate climate and an environment for excellence. A manufacturer needs as the confidential "safe-house" [26] with a modern culture that emphasizes community values. Setting challengeable and achievable goals is important in maintaining a high morale; Battley [9] indicates that teamwork and interpersonal trust are premises for coaching leadership. However, part of a CEO’ job is to foster teamwork [16]. He/she makes commitment with followers to change their habits and adapt their behaviours at every level of the manufacturer [18]. Thus, CEOs must have a ‘breakthrough’ in the initial phase as attracting followers, who understand themselves within the auspices of organizational culture based on a balance between creating modern culture and adapting organisational culture. In short, there should be no boundaries separating departments. A CEO needs to learn from both academics and competitors. In conclusion, the manufacturers need to invest in employees to attend educational and training events.

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Mentoring, coaching and collaborative dialogue to support professional learning throughout teachers’ career paths; exploring roles, responsibilities, tensions and opportunities

Mentoring, coaching and collaborative dialogue to support professional learning throughout teachers’ career paths; exploring roles, responsibilities, tensions and opportunities

Lewis, H and Briggs, M and Holweck, T and Hunter, J and Erkkilä, R and Perunka, S (2019) Men- toring, coaching and collaborative dialogue to support professional learning throughout teachers’ career paths; exploring roles, responsibilities, tensions and opportunities. In: ICSEI Congress 2019, 08 January 2019 - 12 January 2019, Stavanger, Norway. (Unpublished)

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A systematic review of Coaching Psychology with Focus on the Coaching Relationship

A systematic review of Coaching Psychology with Focus on the Coaching Relationship

First, this SR confirmed that coaching processes and the coaching relationship are the key foci of coaching research and practice. One-third of the included studies (47 of 140 papers) highlighted the link between the coaching relationship and coaching results and investigated the effective coaches’ attributes for facilitating a constructive coaching relationship. These studies were mainly conducted using qualitative research methods (12 semi-structured interviews, seven case studies and one longitudinal observation report). The rest of the papers comprise six experiments, 15 surveys and eight mix-methods studies. Second, in the papers reviewed here, the professional psychological training / professional background was emphasised as an essential requirement for a professional coach. Coachees’ emotional reactions / moments were recognised as the key turning points and opportunities to facilitate coachees’ motivations for change. A coach who is able to apply psychological interventions appropriately to identify and manage coachees’ emotional

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The Academy for Future Science Faculty: randomized controlled trial of theory-driven coaching to shape development and diversity of early-career scientists

The Academy for Future Science Faculty: randomized controlled trial of theory-driven coaching to shape development and diversity of early-career scientists

One very unique and novel aspect of the Academy meetings was the design and testing of ways to open up meaningful conversations among students and Coaches around issues of privilege, race, bias, and the real-life is- sues about being ‘different’. This was done subtly during the first 2011 meeting as it was unclear what kind of community would be created when everyone came to- gether. The larger Academy community and the Coach- ing Groups bonded even faster and more strongly than we expected which made it possible to experiment with providing more explicit presentations to create conversa- tions in 2012 and 2013. Those conversations were initi- ated in 2012 by bringing in an expert in critical race theories and the ongoing influences of racism in Amer- ica to address the groups and start the conversations. In 2013, a different speaker was brought in to address the psychological and physiological stresses associated with isolation and being ‘the only one, ’ and strategies to deal with those stressors. In both cases, the very open, hon- est, and deep conversations started by these presenta- tions continued on in subsequent Coaching Group discussions and throughout the remainder of each meeting.

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The effectiveness of business coaching: an empirical analysis of the factors that contribute to successful outcomes

The effectiveness of business coaching: an empirical analysis of the factors that contribute to successful outcomes

coaching effective and identified further variables that should be included in any explanatory framework for the coaching process. The findings in the first study focused on the main components involved in the coaching process: the coach, the coachee, the organisation and the coaching process. A number of variables within these core elements were measured in a questionnaire designed by the researcher using both open and closed ended questions to determine their importance in the coaching process. The specific aims for Study 1 were to:

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Hooked on coaching

Hooked on coaching

Developing and fine-tuning inner- and outer-radars to detect and sense what is happening inside and around me and understanding people’s hopes and fears, even if not expressed in words (Goleman, 1998) are extremely important in coaching and in every other human interaction and relationship. So could I really become a good coach? And how does a good coach look like? A coach definitely needs, in my opinion, a big portion of Emotional Intelligence (EI). EI is not just important for a coach. EI also appears to influence students’ transition from school to higher education and their social integration as research by Engelberg & Sjoberg (2004), Qualter et al. (2009) and Parker et al. (2005) suggest and are in line with Tinto’s model of student withdrawal (1993). And if this is the case, what does this mean for the wider academic community? Are there links between EI, performance and success? Key ingredients of EI are self-awareness, social awareness, but also self-management and relationship management (Goleman et al., 2003). Just having traces of the stuff is definitely not enough. The good news, however, is that it can be learned and we can get better at it. It all starts from within, how we feel about ourselves and how we interact with others. Having the capacity to communicate but also the ability to co-operate and empathise plays a vital role in all this (Goleman et al., 2003). I soon realised that I need much more than just self-awareness for cultivating relationships. I seriously believe that I had a big issue with self-control and relationship management, especially in conflict situations. When dealing with direct people, it was clear that I did not manage them effectively at all in the past. I was aware of their behaviour and did not like it -but probably did the same to others. This bruised relationships. I feel that I am changing and recognise the importance of stepping back and not doing the same to others as they do to me.

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Effects of coaching programmes on employee performance in business process outsourcing subsector of Nairobi city county, Kenya.

Effects of coaching programmes on employee performance in business process outsourcing subsector of Nairobi city county, Kenya.

The second component of the team coaching model addresses the specific times during the task performance process when coaching is the most effective. Here, Hackman and Wageman (2005) claim that coaching interventions do not depend solely on the focus—team effort, strategy, and knowledge and skill—but also on the time during the task process when they are made. In the past, theories on group life cycles have generally treated group development as following a series of stages (example Tuckman’s “forming-storming-norming-performing” model, 1965). More recently, however, research has found that stage models may not accurately represent group development. Gersick (1988) conducted a field study in which she tracked and observed a number of project teams whose performance periods ranged from days to months. She found that each of the project teams developed a unique approach to its task and stayed with this approach until the midpoint of the group’s life cycle (halfway between first meeting and project deadline).

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Possibility of Applying the Concept of Coaching in Serbia

Possibility of Applying the Concept of Coaching in Serbia

Research regarding development of coaching was not conducted in Serbia, nor was the country involved in similar international studies. Frank Bresser et al. in a survey conducted in 2011, found out that there are about 18,000 business coaches in Europe and that it is the continent with the largest number of coaches [8]. How- ever, they are not equally represented—United Kingdom and Germany (almost 20% of the European population) account for about 70% of all business coaches on the continent. In contrast, only 5% of the coaches are in the former communist countries (which comprise about 40% of the population). Serbia as a country that is not even the EU candidate, has not been included in this study. However, according to the seminars in this field, it can be noted that coaching slowly began to spread in the former Eastern European countries, thanks to interna- tional companies, which first “imported” their coaches. Later coaches developed at the local level, through in- ternational coaching associations.

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Determinants in creating a coaching culture for individual performance

Determinants in creating a coaching culture for individual performance

jugamerupakanrespondendidalammenghasilkan kajianini.Borang kaji selidik merupakan istrumen utamabagi menjawab setiap soalan yang diutarakan.Kesemua data yang telah dijawab akan di analis denganmenggunakanperisian Pakejstatistiksains sosial(SPSS). Terdapat lima faktor yang di ketengahkan oleh pengkaji di dalam mewujudkan budaya coaching dan seterusnya dapat meningkatkan prestasi individu. Faktor-faktor tersebut adalah, komitmen daripada pengurus, strategi di dalam perniagaan selari dengan fokus di dalam pembangunan individu, ganjaran dan penghargaan, latihan kepada pelatih, dan peluang di dalam pembelajaran dan pembangunan individu.Hasil kajian menunjukkan bahawa empat faktor mempunyaihubunganpositifiaitu pada tahapsignifikan p<0.01 dan hanya faktor peluang di dalam pembelajaran dan pembangunan individumempunyaihubungan yangpositifiaitu padatahapsignifikanp<0.05. Keputusan kajian juga menunjukkan bahawa terdapat hubungan yang positif iaitu padatahapsignifikanp<0.05 pada budaya

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Instructional Coaching Relationships: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

Instructional Coaching Relationships: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

For Lauren, the majority of her resistance and power struggles lies outside the coaching relationship. The coaching relationship, by contrast, seems to be the one thing that keeps her motivated to keep trying new things. When faced with negativity early on, she sought out ways to work around it. Here Lauren shares how she handled the initial resistance of her department head, “The English department head was not so positive about professional learning and did not foster a warm and welcoming atmosphere. So, I actually well, we created a group of female teachers in the English department…an English professional learning community…sort of underground…” By creating the underground, ‘grass roots’ professional learning community, Lauren attempts to subvert the power of her department head so she can create the support system she needs and share resources amongst her colleagues. This ‘wonderful’ experience as Lauren reminisces fondly, was cut short when the department head caught wind of what they were doing:

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Dialogical self: author and narrator of career life themes

Dialogical self: author and narrator of career life themes

The Theory of Career Construction (Savickas, 2002, 2005) and its earlier formulation (Savickas, 2001) comprehensively covers process and content aspects of career (Patton & McMahon, 2006) and is lauded as being nearest to a single integrated theoretical framework for career (Inkson, 2007). Within the Theory of Career Construction, the term career signifies reflection upon an individual’s vocational activity; that is, reflection upon the objective career, such as occupations, tasks, and duties. The reflective process can also focus upon the meaning ascribed to career events; that is, the subjective career. Savickas (2005) posited three components of the theory: Vocational personality, career adaptability, and life themes. In combination, the three components provide a comprehensive theory of career which has considerable potential to subsume a range of theories emanating from different paradigms. Given its broad theoretical capacity and relevance to counselling practice, the Theory of Career Construction is addressed in this paper. The notion of life themes is focused upon specifically, with the aim of further developing its theoretical composition.

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The impact of student characteristics and students' attitude towards coaching on self directed learning and career identity in vocational education

The impact of student characteristics and students' attitude towards coaching on self directed learning and career identity in vocational education

In order to meet the constantly changing demands of the labor market it is important that, already during their vocational education, students learn to direct their own learning and begin to form their career identity. Self-directed learning (SDL) refers to the behavior to independently steer towards your own learning goals. Career identity (CI) is a cognitive concept, and means knowing who you are, which job fits you and knowing if you can be the person you want to be in your future job. To support students to direct their own learning and develop a stronger career identity, nowadays schools for vocational education have set up coaching programs in which teachers are expected to offer students career guidance. In these programs, coaching sessions are an important element. Because almost all teachers are expected to coach students, it is questionable whether every teacher is suitable for this role. In this study, the focus is not only on the impact of coaching sessions on SDL and CI, but also on the influence of the quality of the coach. In particular, the student perspective on coaching is investigated, because students should benefit from the coaching and the coaching should help them to learn more self-directed in career processes and develop a stronger career identity. In addition, it was investigated to what extent student characteristics influenced SDL and CI. There is made a distinction between demographic characteristics and study-related characteristics. Using quantitative data, in this study the relationship between student characteristics and SDL and CI was examined. To discover whether coaching influences this relationship, it was investigated if coaching acted as a mediating factor. This study was based on data collected in the study of Brandenburg (2014), who did research among students from the Dutch vocation educational institute Landstede. From the results it can be concluded that coaching had a positive effect on both self-directed learning in career and forming a career identity, although the influence on self-directed learning in career was larger than the influence on career identity. It also appeared that there was a relation between some student characteristics and SDL and CI. This means that schools should take into account that students are different and therefore may have different needs.

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Beginning Teachers that Coach High School Athletics: A Case Study.

Beginning Teachers that Coach High School Athletics: A Case Study.

Since Coach Earle entered the field through the alternative licensing program known as lateral entry, the coach was asked about the background and training that served as preparation for the classroom and the playing field. Coach Earle responded in two parts, dividing training for the classroom and the athletic field. The coach said, “I was a lateral entry teacher. I worked in retail management before I began teaching, and that gave me a lot of classroom management skill because I think I might have been more mature that the average teacher coming out of college. I’d been in the workforce for a while already. As far as sports go, I played sports all through high school. I played college athletics. I always dreamt of being a coach, but I never really pursued it, mainly based on a matter of timing. My first day of work after college was on September 11 th , 2001, so if you had a job you kept it, and I didn’t want to make that change at that time. Later, it all really kind of worked out together, and when I finally got a chance to coach I went right into teaching as well.” Coach Earle also stated that since becoming a teacher, coaching has been a three-sports-per-year vocation, involving football, basketball, and track and field.

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