Children and Solitude

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"I to Solitude am still confind". Confinement and Resistance in Lady Hester Pulter's Poetry

"I to Solitude am still confind". Confinement and Resistance in Lady Hester Pulter's Poetry

owners ruined (Hardacre 19-20). Another possible reason for being in debt was the compromise some royalists reached with parliament: they could be released from prison after paying a fine to parliament and taking the Covenant and Negative Oath (Hardacre 20 and 22). The Covenant was an oath “by which the taker swore to resist innovations in religion” (Hardacre 22). With the Negative Oath people had to forswear their support to the king and pledge their support to parliament: “I, A. B., do swear from my heart that I will not directly or indirectly adhere unto or willingly assist the King in this war, or in this cause against the Parliament, nor any forces raised without the consent of the two Houses of Parliament in this cause or war. And I do likewise swear that my coming and submitting myself under the power and protection of the Parliament, is without any manner of design whatsoever, to the prejudice of the proceedings of the two Houses of this present Parliament, and without the direction, privity or advice of the King, or any of his Council or officers, other than what I have now made known. So help me God, and the contents of this Book.” (“Negative Oath”). For Pulter it seems that the restraints imposed on her and other royalists were unacceptable. To be confined by her political enemies would in no way have positive consequences, neither for her soul, nor for her children, and she deeply resented it.
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Images of women breastfeeding in public: solitude and sociality in recent photographic portraiture

Images of women breastfeeding in public: solitude and sociality in recent photographic portraiture

The diversity and volume of images of women breast- feeding in public (as well as in domestic spaces) has increased exponentially over the past decade. The role of digital media in the wide circulation of these images, at least among other women, has provided a unique oppor- tunity for the participatory condition of these women to be enhanced beyond solitude, even though they may be alone while doing so. Added to this, the interest in images of breastfeeding, fuelled by celebrity brelfies in mainstream women ’ s magazines, and the rise of breastfeeding-positive professional photographers, has provided the opportunity for advocates, mommy bloggers and other enthusiasts to collect artwork and more obscure social history images of women breastfeeding in a variety of circumstances. At the same time, the opportunity to represent mothers breast- feeding while also socializing with other adults and children, in quotidian circumstances, spaces and condi- tions, remains elusive. Until this changes, breastfeeding will continue to belong in a space of seclusion, either idealized within the fantastical realm of the mythic maternal, or politicized as lactivist separatism in group protest shots, and in both instances held at a reverential distance from everyday social interactions with others.
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Rewriting History: A Comparative Analysis of Mo Yan’s Big Breasts and Wide Hips and García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude

Rewriting History: A Comparative Analysis of Mo Yan’s Big Breasts and Wide Hips and García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude

In this chapter, my central argument is that both García Márquez and Mo Yan have the consciousness of writing women into history. I mainly focus on the representations of the most important female characters in both of the two novels, Úrsula and Mother. Through my analysis, I find that both García Márquez and Mo Yan recognize the power of women and attempt to emphasize it through their experiences in the historical process. But there is still a difference between One Hundred Years and Big Breasts. In the case of One Hundred Years, Úrsula is depicted as a heroine and she has a great impact on Macondo. To be more precise, her deeds indeed lead to significant historical changes and her deteriorating health is used to signal the decline of Macondo. But in Big Breasts, Mother, though powerful and courageous, is merely an ordinary Chinese woman who tries to survive the turbulent decades and protect her children. In other words, in my opinion, what Mo Yan intends to do is to represent the lives of the ordinary women, and to enable their pain and sorrow as well as the oppression that they have suffered to come to light. And the strength of Mother shown through her experience in the political unrest further suggests that women are not weak and object-like by nature, but rather they are powerful agents.
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Self-mythology Through Trauma Studies in Paul Auster’s Invention of Solitude

Self-mythology Through Trauma Studies in Paul Auster’s Invention of Solitude

However, Auster’s use of the world “invention” within the title also insinuates that he does not think that memory represents a full truth, or encompasses all the potential of the “pre-existing” self. Rather, he insinuates that there is not a “unique and autonomous” self to be discovered, but rather the self that is invented, and who is evolving, as the myth is self-written (Dow 272). Similarly, Auster found that “even as adults we have buried within us a memory of the way we perceived the world as children” (Auster 148). In the case of Auster, it is clear that he perceived his father as cold and indifferent because of his personal dislike for Auster himself, and for his family as a whole. However, when he goes on a journey to “find” his father, he discovers that his narcissistic perception, based on memory and the experience of child- hood, was not an accurate depiction of his father, and his motivations. Rather, it was more reflective of Auster’s own sense of rejection, because of his father’ actions, and because of the trauma of his father’s indifference, thus it was not ra- tionally founded in reality.
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An Interpretation of Female Images in One Hundred Years of Solitude

An Interpretation of Female Images in One Hundred Years of Solitude

Apart from being submissive, loyal, brave, gentle and merciful, Úrsula Iguarán still has masculinity. She is very diligent and support the whole family like a man. When her husband was addicted to his alchemy and made daydreams, she started her own business by selling sweets. Besides, she grew vegetables, raised livestocks and nurtured her children and offsprings. It is her that arranges the whole family in a perfect order. In addition, she is valiant and decisive. When her husband’s addiction to gypsy’s things threatened the family, she gathered all people in Macondo to boycott his action. When her grandson Arcadio ruled Macondo like a dictator, persecuted townspeople and appreciated public funds for his private use, she called him murder and bastard, whipped him mercilessly, released those innocent prisoners and ruled the town by herself since then. When her son Aureliano decided to sentence José Raquel Moncada, the Conservative general, to death, she asked all mothers of those soldiers to stop it because José Raquel Moncada was a good mayor. However, this trial was in vain.
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Solitude

Solitude

Then he would wink and mention that they would make sure their mother could blame the farts on the dog; Franklin had a fatal weakness for cheese.. He smirked at that memory, filling the[r]

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Psychosocial Characteristics of Homeless Children and Children With Homes

Psychosocial Characteristics of Homeless Children and Children With Homes

Manifest Anxiety Scale, and Child Behavior Checklist Scores of Homeless School-Aged Children and School- Aged Children With Homes*. Homeless Children[r]

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Do Children Sexually Abuse Other Children?

Do Children Sexually Abuse Other Children?

6. Set clear guidelines and keep a careful eye on children’s Internet and video game use and the tv shows and movies they watch. Explain to children the risks associated with using the Internet, restrict access to sites that are not age-appropriate, and ask them to tell you if they receive messages or emails containing suggestive or sexually explicit material. Keep your computer in a public place so you can easily monitor their use. Check that TV shows, films and videos are age-appropriate. Watch programs with children and use what they see as “teachable moments” to share information and values. Make agreements with other adults that the guidelines of a visiting child’s parents or guardians will be respected during play dates or visits.
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On Children

On Children

I'd always imagined middle children to be naturally inclined to feel comfortable with those older and younger than them, more like a biological trait rather than one developed by an e[r]

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Health of Homeless Children and Housed, Poor Children

Health of Homeless Children and Housed, Poor Children

Comparing the homeless and housed families by family structure (single- parent vs two-parent family), the prevalence of family violence (spouse or child abuse) and sub- stance abuse was [r]

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Children

Children

In conclusion, this paper explores what we can learn from children. Different from most researches focusing on how to educating children, this paper extends Mencius’s (2005) suggestion, “The great man is he who does not lose his child- like heart,” to recognize 8 principles (e.g., “alive”, “play”, etc.) we adults can learn from children. Specifically, as Confucius (1998) mentioned, success comes from choosing what you love, and enjoy it just like a kid, and you will never have to work a day in your life. Playing and enjoying instead of making efforts in life are exactly what children inspire us. Living a life with passion also exemplifies children’s pureness and sincerity which inspire us to be genuine. In sum, this paper explores the characteristics of children to awaken adults’ exhausted minds and to inspire adults’ assumptions against children.
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Sof children with special needs includes older children, children

Sof children with special needs includes older children, children

S of “children with special needs” includes older children, children of color, children with physical, mental, or emotional problems, and children who are part of a sibling group. (See the article by Rosenthal in this journal issue.) However, for those who work in the field of special needs adoption, the term has come to have an additional and broader meaning: a child welfare service which seeks permanent homes for children in foster care who will not ever be able to be reunited with their birthparents. As such, it is the option considered and implemented only after all attempts to reconcile children with their families have failed. These children became labeled as “special needs” not because of a physical or mental disability, although some of the children do have developmental disabilities, but because, through default of parents and bureaucracies, they have become wards of the system. Most of them have experienced some significant trauma in their young lives, including deprivation, physical and sexual abuse, abandonment, loss, and many moves in foster care. As a result, they are prone to emotional, behav- ioral, and learning problems. Once these children are adopted, they are very challenging to parent. Many of them require highly skilled and
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Conclusion : The female children, rural children, children from

Conclusion : The female children, rural children, children from

The coefficients for wealth index are consistently negative but decline across cut-points. This means that children were their wealth index was poor more affected by anemia than the children’s whose their wealth index were middle and rich, with the greatest differences being the children poor were less likely to put themselves in moderate and severe categories. Conversely, the age group effect is negative but gets larger across cut points. Hence, higher age group tend to be less anemic than lower age group with the greatest differences being that higher age group are less likely to place in put themselves moderate and severe categories. Sex, the odds of having higher chance of moderate and severe anemia for male children is 14% less likely than female children when it is compared with Mild anemia. Likewise, the odds of having higher chance of severe anemia for male children 14% less likely than female children when it is compared with Mild and moderate anemia.
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A Profile of children in Rwanda's Unaccompanied Children Centres:

A Profile of children in Rwanda's Unaccompanied Children Centres:

Information on a child’s origin tells us two important pieces of information. First, it tells us from where in the country that children in centres originate. The absolute number of children coming from specific provinces provides a quantifiable magnitude particularly useful for planning interventions. In Rwanda, among the 3082 children who presently reside in centres and have a known origin, by far the highest number come from the western province of Gisenyi (Figure 15). Second, the child’s origin, with respect to where the centre where he or she lives is located, is a measure of the extent to which children are living away from their home setting. Figure 15 also reveals that many children in centres do not reside in one located in their province of origin. In four provinces (Butare, Kibungo, Kigali Rural and Kibuye), there are more children originally from these provinces than actually live in centres in these provinces. On the other hand, centres such as those in Kigali Ville and Gitarama absorb relatively more children from other provinces.
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Children on the edge of care : human rights and the Children Act

Children on the edge of care : human rights and the Children Act

amended the Act to allow for this. At the same time, it took the opportunity to amend the Act to the effect that a child provided with accommodation under Section 17 would not acquire ‘looked after’ status. Some local authorities initially welcomed this, as it seemed to reduce their legal obligations towards unaccompanied asylum- seeking children who they provided with accommodation under Section 17. This would also mean that the Children (Leaving Care) Act did not apply to these young people so local authorities would not have to provide them with ongoing support. In fact, the Government’s guidance on the amendment set out quite clearly that ‘where a child has no parent or guardian in this country, perhaps because he has arrived alone seeking asylum, the presumption should be that he would fall within the scope of section 20 and become looked after’ (Department of Health, 2003b). The guidance also usefully stated that, before deciding which section of the Children Act provides the legal basis for the provision of support, local authorities should carry out an assessment of a child’s needs using the Framework for the Assessment of
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Children on the Homefront: The Experience of Children From Military Families

Children on the Homefront: The Experience of Children From Military Families

OBJECTIVE: Although studies have begun to explore the impact of the current wars on child well-being, none have examined how children are doing across social, emotional, and academic domains. In this study, we describe the health and well-being of children from military families from the perspectives of the child and nondeployed parent. We also assessed the experience of deployment for children and how it varies according to deployment length and military service component. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS. Data from a computer-assisted tele- phone interview with military children, aged 11 to 17 years, and non- deployed caregivers (n ⫽ 1507) were used to assess child well-being and difficulties with deployment. Multivariate regression analyses as- sessed the association between family characteristics, deployment histories, and child outcomes.
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Children without Childhood   Proletarianization of Children and Its Implications

Children without Childhood Proletarianization of Children and Its Implications

3.12. The Postmodern Age - is Childhood Disappearing? Postman [50] in his book The disappearance of childhood, argues that childhood as we know is disappearing and that the distinction between adulthood and childhood is narrowing. Kathleen McDonnell, [51] in her book Honey, We Lost the Kids, stresses that the lines that used to distinguish between adulthood and childhood are growing blurred through television and internet/social media. Children are now able to access the “adult world”, as a result childhood as we know is fast disappearing in the West. There is a growing similarity in the adult and children´s clothing. There are cases where children are playing computer games that simulate mass murder, as well as commit adult crimes like murder and rape. There is also a growing emphasis on “Learners Voice” in education. Children are also increasingly being used on interview panels for new teachers. The UN rights of the child are giving them same rights as adults. Childhood that used to be a protected sphere where adult gatekeepers could control what and when children learned about the grown-up 'facts of life', is slowly disappearing.
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Aldosterone excretion in normal children and in children with adrenal hyperplasia

Aldosterone excretion in normal children and in children with adrenal hyperplasia

Blizzard, Liddle, Migeon, and Wilkins 27, in a comprehensive study of normal children and children with salt-losing and simple virilizing adrenal hyperplasia, found that when salt was re[r]

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Pediatric welcome to children listen to children of deaf countries

Pediatric welcome to children listen to children of deaf countries

Introduction: Parents who are deaf and hearing-impaired go through various difficulties when they need care for their child in some public sector. In health it is no different, many professionals are not able to provide care to the hearing child daughter of deaf parents, creating a barrier in communication and thus difficult the reception in an effective way. Objective: To verify the pediatric reception of the hearing child of deaf parents. Methodology: This is an exploratory, descriptive study of a qualitative approach carried out with 14 families belonging to a support group of a public school and linked to health services in the city of Vitória da Conquista - BA, which his family group children listeners daughters of deaf parents. The information was collected through guided semi-structured interviews and the data were analyzed through the Bardin content analysis technique. Results: All the participants of the study reported difficulties in communicating with the professionals and also in understanding the orientations passed by them, thus presenting indignation for a lack of communicability. The main tool used to have this communication between them is related to an accompanying person, who can intermediate this communication, however it brings to the deaf the feeling of impotence and incapacity. Most of them report having a minor assistance quality to their children, when compared the children of the other parents. Conclusion: It was possible to notice that there are regulations that aim to welcome the deaf person, however, it is noted that their use in practice is still in the process of being built, and that there is an improvement in this assistance, there is a need for greater capacity building these professionals.
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Children and their parent’s perceptions of overweight and obesity in Kuwait children

Children and their parent’s perceptions of overweight and obesity in Kuwait children

The participants perceptions were evaluated through valid questionnaires adopted from the literature (Al-Isa et al., 2010; El-Bayoumy et al., 2009). For the student’s perception of their weight, they were asked how they would describe their weight. For this question there was a number of pre determined responses which described their perception of their own weight. Children needed to select one of these answers, in order to assess their own perception of their actual weight. For the parental perception, multi questions were asked to assess their perception of overweight and obesity and their perception of their child body weight. The questions included: “How do you rate your child’s body weight?”, “Do you think that your child might have a weight problem?” Parents were also asked to respond to the following statement “Overweight children are unhealthy”
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