Classical Christian Education

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The Effect of Team Sports in Classical, Christian Education

The Effect of Team Sports in Classical, Christian Education

Antoine de Saint-Exupery once noted if you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea (“A quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupery,” n.d.). This quote embodies the goal of classical education, but it also parallels the values taught in sport. There has been a resurgence of classical education in recent years, and these new schools are focusing on instilling in students a love for learning, a passion for truth and beauty, and a simultaneous prudent understanding of and appreciation for the world around them (Caldecott, 2012). Is there a place, in classical, Christian education, for learning these virtues through sport? Strong academics should always be the driving force behind any secondary school, and research shows that children who are in involved in sports in adolescence reap physical benefits and make strides in the areas of morality and virtue (Ball, Bice, & Parry, 2016; Schmid, 2012). The purpose of this study is to answer the question: do team sports reinforce the values emphasized in classical, Christian education? The researcher used a qualitative method of study through an opinion-based online questionnaire that featured open-ended questions. Athletic directors from over 20 classical, Christian schools sent out the survey to their alumni, and 47 responses were received. The responses were overwhelmingly in favor of sports reinforcing the virtues taught in an academic setting, therefore the conclusion drawn is that sports play a vital role in supporting the focus of academics in a classical, Christian school.
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A Case Study of Stakeholders’ Motivation to Invest in Classical Christian Education

A Case Study of Stakeholders’ Motivation to Invest in Classical Christian Education

unfamiliar with the classical Christian philosophy expected that SLA would be different than the schools at which they worked previously. Many teachers in this category did not know the exact differences they were looking for, but recognized in SLA, that the philosophy was different. The teachers who had little-to-no knowledge of classical Christian education also held the philosophy in high value, even if they had only worked at SLA for a short time. Other teachers, who were familiar with the classical Christian philosophy expected SLA to operate with little-to-no elements of a progressive educational philosophy. The teachers in this category also expected certain elements of the classical Christian philosophy to be implemented. These elements included: building a foundation of knowledge and providing a well-rounded education by educating the whole child. The teachers in this category found a high level of value in their investment in classical Christian education as well. There were some teachers at SLA, mostly those who attended a classical liberal arts college, who knew a great deal about the classical Christian philosophy. Teachers in this category expected that the classical Christian philosophy would be adhered to with fidelity at SLA. They expected that their classical Christian school would hold the same standards that their classical liberal arts college held and that the education would look similar to what they had experienced while attending their college. The teachers in this category placed a great deal of value in their investment in preparing to teach at a classical Christian school.
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Student Perceptions of Trivium-Based Education in Classical Christian Schools: A Phenomenological Study

Student Perceptions of Trivium-Based Education in Classical Christian Schools: A Phenomenological Study

In February of 2019, I interviewed Sophia, who was 26-years-old. I interviewed her using a recorded FaceTime video session as she walked through the streets of New York City. The session concluded with Sophia located in a stock closet off the kitchen of the restaurant where she was presently working. I was in my home office for the entirety of the interview. At the time of the session, she was married and presently enrolled in an associate's program for fashion design in New York City, NY. Immediately following her trivium experience, Sophia graduated from a Christian liberal arts college in Pennsylvania with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a minor in classical Christian education. Before moving to New York, she worked briefly for an educational non-profit through the Charles Koch Institute in Washington, DC. Sophia graduated through her trivium experience at four different ACCS member schools, three of which were established by her father. Her grammar experience was with a single school in Pennsylvania. Her logic and rhetoric experience was with three different schools in various cities across Virginia. Maturing with a great deal of transition has seemed to follow Sophia into her professional career and adulthood as she still seems unsure of what her future holds. She explained,
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Increase Meaning: A Wholistic Approach to Christian Education

Increase Meaning: A Wholistic Approach to Christian Education

e) Learners will participate in the following experiential activities (practicum): 1. Teach a group of students, peers, or parents of students how to use the “Truth and Baloney Detector,” and submit a 1-2 page report on how it went; 2. Teach a lesson to a group of students, peers, or parents that makes relevant connections between academic subject matter and the “bigger picture” of a biblical worldview, and submit a copy of the lesson plan to the instructor [including the “Integration Conversation Starter” introduced in this course], along with a 1-2 page report on how it went; 3. Teach a group of students, peers, or parents how to use the “DADI Plan” to make intentional alignments between the biblical worldview and either academic or non-academic activities (you may use a modified version of the “DADI Plan” for younger students, called the “Awesome Activator”); 4. Teach a group of students, peers, or parents a lesson that incorporates concepts of theology of work found in two resources by Christian Overman: God’s Pleasure At Work and/or The Difference One Life Can Make
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The Role of Christian Education in the Development of Spiritual Stamina in Young Adult Graduates of Christian Schools

The Role of Christian Education in the Development of Spiritual Stamina in Young Adult Graduates of Christian Schools

S: I sometimes would talk to my parents a lot. I was pretty open with them about the issues I was struggling with. I would look up in the Bible what it said about certain things and I would challenge myself. If I’m a Christian and if I believed the Bible to be true in its entirety, then these things still apply. People used the argument that culture is changing so we should be changing too. But then, I came to the conclusion that God knew that culture was gonna change when the Bible was written and it still was written the way it was written. That was my ultimate… like okay, This is right and it is still right, it’s right today and it will be right 1000 years from now. That was really just prayer and seeking that out and just talking it out in what I thought. Even if I was wrong, I talked to my grandpa and my dad and people that are older, and even if I was wrong they can tell me what they think and I can look it up. V: What about your Christian education at Calvary, made a positive or negative impact on your spiritual walk? S: I would say it’s mostly positive. I was actually talking to my dad about this earlier tonight about what I was going to talk about and…my mom’s a teacher there, my dad’s on the board and my sister went there. So, we’re very much in to Christian education. I definitely support Christian education but I think that the only negative thing is that you’re kind of in a bubble. …recognize reality is actually going to face you. That’s like what I said, when I left Christian education I didn’t know what the world was gonna throw at me or how vulnerable I would be because you get in this place of, “I’m invincible” like I grew up this way, and you’re not. Positively, I was taught a lot about the Bible and taught the right things to do. I went through senior year; we did a class called Understanding the Times where we learned about different religions and social issues which was really good. But, I think it’s probably something that should have been taught all through high school because it’s almost too late when you’re 18 and your mind is one track, “I know what I’m talking about”. But I think over-all it was very positive to grow up in that environment and that culture but I also think the negative part was just being in that bubble of all Christian people. Because that’s not reality. It is as you live as Christians because you want to live in community with other people but in terms of going to a secular college, that’s not reality. You have to find those people. You have to seek them out and really get into community. So, I would say that’s the only negative part.
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Liberal Arts Traditions and Christian Higher Education

Liberal Arts Traditions and Christian Higher Education

What is a liberal arts education? Given the frequent use of the term, it is remarkable how confusing it can be. Too often those involved in liberal arts education, faculty, staff and administrators, as well as students, have only a fairly vague sense of its meaning, and those meanings are often in conflict with one another.

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Prenatal Life Education Based on Family Christian Religious Education

Prenatal Life Education Based on Family Christian Religious Education

Attention to pregnant women, infants, toddlers and school-age children in the government era President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) received special attention. President Jokowi promised to guarantee the health of pregnant women to school-age children. Through Jokowi's victory speech for the second period (2019-2024) as president, titled Visi Indonesia on July 14, 2019 at the Sentul International Convention Center. Jokowi said "We will give our development priority to the development of human resources (HR). HR is the key for Indonesia in the future ". Development of human resources according to Jokowi, is done by ensuring the health of pregnant women to school-age children in Indonesia. Furthermore, Jokowi emphasized that "the starting point for human resource development is to ensure the health of pregnant women, the health of infants, the health of children under five, the health of school- age children (cnbcindonesia.com, 2019). In order to make a real contribution to the good wishes of the government, now is the time to contribute thoughts to the priorities of HR development. Awareness of the importance of ensuring the health of pregnant women is interpreted from an educational perspective as a deliberate, planned and constructive effort to instill life education to Indonesian people since pregnancy or prenatal life education. The prenatal period is the beginning of the process of human growth and development that is when humans are not yet born or are still in the mother's womb. However, many rural communities tend not to do things that can affect the psychological development of children in the prenatal period, this happens because they assume that the beginning of psychological development begins when the child is born. Yet at this time the determinants and shapers of the character and behavior of children after birth.
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Creatio ex Nihilo: Matter, Creation, and the Body in Classical and Christian Philosophy Through Aquinas

Creatio ex Nihilo: Matter, Creation, and the Body in Classical and Christian Philosophy Through Aquinas

Creatio ex nihilo marked a major redefinition of the material cosmos by the Christian apologists of the late second century, Tatian and Theophilus of Antioch. Other scholars have properly assigned the origin of creatio ex nihilo to these thinkers, notably Gerhard May and David Winston, but the reasons for the teaching' s appearance remained unexplained. By examining the Classical philosophical views of matter, the challenge that Greek views of matter raised for the Christian message become evident. For Stoic, Platonist, and Peripatetic alike matter imposed the natural necessity of corruption upon the body. The moral limitations imposed by matter made a bodily resurrection seem offensive. Christian hopes for a resurrection seemed misguided both intellectually and morally. The Christian apologists of the late second century struck back by redefining matter as a creature of God, which he directed to his purpose. The religious claims of the Christian apologists signalled a major philosophical change. Within a century, Plotinus developed a rigorous monistic system of emanation within the Greek philosophical tradition. In his system, even matter was derived from the One. Nevertheless, because it was wholly indefinite, matter remained evil and the sage eschewed it. Augustine gave creatio ex nihilo its first careful philosophical consideration in the Christian tradition. Turning the valences of the Classical world on their heads, he argued that as something capable of being formed into good things, matter itself was good and a creature of the good God. The next major philosophical consideration of creatio ex nihilo in the Christian tradition came at the hands of Aquinas, who taught that creatio ex nihilo meant that nothing was presupposed to God's creative act, not matter, forms, natures, essences, ideas, laws of nature, or a hierarchy of being. The creature depended entirely on God's creative act. Despite the great dependence of the creature upon God, Aquinas taught that the creature still bore a genuine likeness to God, in his highly developed teaching of participation.
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A Rationale For Christian Mission In Theological Education

A Rationale For Christian Mission In Theological Education

the theological design of the present, for the Church in and to the world, is the consciousness of obligation and of sensitive relatedness which makes the message a living form for men and women, whether in the east or west. We cannot do better than begin with the concept of “Mission in Six Continents” as was realized after the ecumenical meeting at Mexico City in 1966. But it is soon found that descriptive directions are only the tools, and the living skills to follow them must lie in theological perspective. The combined impetus of ecumenical developments with the formation of the World Council of Churches and the concern for a missionary identity in the greatly disturbed late colonial period gave new reason for the relation of theology and mission in theological education. John A. Mackay in his position both with the International Missionary Council and with Princeton Theological Seminary established recognition for what he called “Ecumenics” as a new discipline in the seminary, which was in fact “the keystone of its educational arch.” In his A Preface to Christian Theology he had visualized the “new missionary role” of Christian theology at a time when the world was threatened with disintegration and secular theologies were beginning to appear. 10 Mackay saw the need for theology to abandon its scholastic isolation,
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Personal. Education. English, The Best Christian

Personal. Education. English, The Best Christian

Beauty Will Save the World: Art, Faith, and the Vision of Christian Humanism (ISI Books, forthcoming). Bearing the Mystery: Twenty Years of IMAGE (Eerdmans, 2009), editor. God With Us: Rediscovering the Meaning of Christmas, co-editor (Paraclete, 2007) Bless This House: Prayers for Children and Families (Jossey-Bass, 2004).

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Cicero and St. Augustine\u27s Just War Theory: Classical Influences on a Christian Idea

Cicero and St. Augustine\u27s Just War Theory: Classical Influences on a Christian Idea

Augustine and Cicero both acknowledged that God, whether or not it is the Christian God, is the source of natural law. They even seem to have agreed that God plays an active part in the administration of natural law and that obeying natural law means submitting to God as master, even though they disagreed on what submission to God meant for the individual. In the passage above, Cicero said, “But there will be one law, eternal and unchangeable, binding at all times upon all peoples; and there will be, as it were, one common master and ruler of men, namely God, who is the author of this law, its interpreter, and its sponsor.” This is a surprising statement coming from a pagan, but it does not seem to be the addition of an editor, since it matches the concept of God presented by Cicero at length in De natura deorum. The last sentence of this passage, though, gives the clue to Cicero’s perceived relationship between God and human. Cicero wrote, “Whoever is disobedient is fleeing from himself and denying his human nature, and by reason of this very fact he will suffer the worst penalties, even if he escapes what is commonly considered punishment.” According to Cicero a person submits to God as his or her master by living according to natural law and practicing virtue, which is “right reason in agreement with nature.” There is no personal
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Holding Fast: Christian Education Across the Centuries

Holding Fast: Christian Education Across the Centuries

Sunday schools in England and in the United States contributed greatly to the cause of Christian education. In the late 1700s the Sunday school movement began to thrive in Great Britain, with Robert Raikes being one of its most well- known leaders. Sunday schools began as a separate entity from the church with the primary goal of offering religious and moral education to poor children on Sundays. As the movement progressed, it broadened in scope to reach a larger variety of children. Sunday schools soon spread to the United States where by the nineteenth century more than 100,000 were in operation.
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A Guide to Christian Education & Youth Ministry at BCCUCC

A Guide to Christian Education & Youth Ministry at BCCUCC

7 Is there a registration fee for Church School? Everyone is welcome to participate in church school programs regardless of economic status, ability to contribute, or amount of pledge. We do not charge a registration fee. However, in addition to countless volunteer hours, church members and friends prayerfully discern an amount to contribute to the church in the form of a pledge to the annual budget (the budget includes building expenses, church staff, outreach, and education programs). Please call the church office if you’d like to begin making a pledge or would like to give an additional donation directly to Christian Education programs.
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Leadership in Christian Early Childhood Education: A Grounded Theory

Leadership in Christian Early Childhood Education: A Grounded Theory

When Darlene and her husband moved to Melbourne with his work she then took on a position in a local government childcare centre affiliated with the Department of Immigration in the building next door. Many new families came there that did not speak English, and the Department of Immigration would help them. She remembers: “That really positioned me well to learn about cultural inclusiveness and various issues like that; assimilation, and ultimately my second son was born and he actually came to work with me. He was the only Anglo-Saxon child in the service” (12.2.16). After some time her father-in-law, living in Sydney, became very ill and the family made the decision to move back there; they bought land and built a home. Darlene then worked in local government for some time overseeing a number of services, and was seconded to the University of Western Sydney and then to the Department of Community Services. It was during her time working on reviews of services, which included validation, reviewing licensing and prosecution, that one experience caused her to reflect deeply on what she was doing. She had spent hours working on a prosecution, in which the owner was simply fined and then re-opened for business the next day. As she reflected she came to a very strong conclusion. In her own words: “…and I thought this just isn't right. In my heart I just know I have to set up a high quality, Christian based service. I just knew!” (12.2.16). But how?... and where?
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Education Personification Theory on the Historicity of Classical Greek Philosophers

Education Personification Theory on the Historicity of Classical Greek Philosophers

Simply put, to personify names (i.e. transform cooked up names into human beings, or as if they existed as real human beings), then constitute it as a curriculum currently being taught in schools as Gospel truth is an educa- tion misnomer. That is, no education system (anywhere) should tolerate cooked up or cleverly invented myths and stories (which never happened) to be taught in our schools; Harry Boer (1980) in a Short History of the Early Church, cited by Father Tertullian (200BC) who was so annoyed with Greek ophites and related academ- ics of wisdom. He said that he thought those academics taught the useful things, only for him to enter and dis- cover that in what they called “Books of Wisdom” were contained fairy tales of the “Phoebus” (Phili, i.e. rival and opposition gods from the Phoenician “Baalis” (Phalis, i.e. to be against or man-made), being rival gods of- ten fighting senselessly, including Jupiter raping his own sister (Hebrew “Sapheca”) see Isaiah 2:6 “Philisti are Sophiku (i.e. sexually immoral pagans following many (soephim) gods (sephir) Boer, 1980: p. 50, Hebrew Old Testament, 2005, 1 Kings 18:21.
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CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE SMALL MEMBERSHIP CHURCH by Ruth A. Wiertzema

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE SMALL MEMBERSHIP CHURCH by Ruth A. Wiertzema

Showing genuine appreciation and support for the teachers you do have is essential. Everyone needs encouragement; everyone needs to know they are valued. Many persons in small membership churches have given years and years to teaching. Such faithfulness should never be taken for granted. Any teacher who takes seriously the call to teach also wants to grow spiritually and to develop their teaching skills. Any church that takes their teachers seriously wants to provide opportunities for them as well. I have been challenging pastors for a number of years to look at the example of Jesus. He not only called the disciples, he taught them. Since there are limitations to the pastor's involvement in teaching, I know of no better choice than to follow this example and become a teacher of teachers. Quarterly gatherings of pastor and teachers could do much to help teachers grow and keep the pastor connected. It would strengthen the entire educational ministry of the church. Identifying and inviting potential teachers would be excellent, and would have a positive affect on recruitment in the future. The format for Christian education gatherings could include a devotion by the pastor, a time of sharing successes and concerns, and a longer segment devoted to specific skill training such as storytelling, using study helps, classroom discipline, etc. There are many resources for teacher training available from Cokesbury bookstores and catalogs. High on my list of recommendations are:
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Christian Clerical Schools – Shelters of Education and Culture in Albanian Territories Christian Clerical Schools – Shelters of Education and Culture in Albanian Territories

Christian Clerical Schools – Shelters of Education and Culture in Albanian Territories Christian Clerical Schools – Shelters of Education and Culture in Albanian Territories

In the late Middle Ages, learning locations were established at parishes, which arose in the villages. They were considered as a continuation of the church catechism school materials. Roman education system in villages was shabby and in Roman period there were no elementary school worked in there but with the increase of population, the villages needed larger space-time education for clergy. This need that time served not only clergy monastery monks, but also learn parish clergy. These established the first schools of the parish. They "were elementary schools that serve to provide primary education to boys who were considered as possible candidates for priesthood. After bishops themselves completing initial studies, they continued further studies in schools or cathedrals, where initially served as teachers, and later delegated this task to their subordinates" 11 .
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John Wesley and engaged aesthetics: transformative Christian education

John Wesley and engaged aesthetics: transformative Christian education

changed his philosophy of finances and set him on the path that he was to follow for the rest of his life. In 1786, Wesley retold an experience that impressed on him not just the plight of the poor, but his Christian duty to them: Many years ago, when I was at Oxford, in a cold winter’s day, a young maid (one of those we kept at school) called upon me. I said, “You seem half-starved. Have you nothing to cover you but that thin linen gown?” She said, “Sir, this is all I have!” I put my hand in my pocket, but found I had scarce any money left, having just paid away what I had. It immediately struck me, “Will thy Master say, ‘Well done, good and faithful steward,’ Thou hast adorned thy walls with the money which might have screened this poor creature from the cold! O justice! O mercy! Are not these pictures the blood of this poor maid?” See thy expensive apparel in the same light; thy gown, hat, headdress! Everything which cost more than Christian duty required thee to lay out is the blood of the poor! O be wise for the time to come! Be more merciful! More faithful to God and man! More abundantly adorned (like men and women professing godliness) with good works! 77
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Pedagogy of Christian Religious Education in Nigerian Schools

Pedagogy of Christian Religious Education in Nigerian Schools

4.2. John Dewey John Dewey, an American philosopher and educationist advocates for experiential learning. Dewey teaches that education should connect learners with the activities that they live and do in their communities which will give them real, guided experiences that will foster their capacity to contribute to society. For Dewey (1997), learning is reflecting upon human experiences, and humans are forced to reflect especially when they are confronted with problems. Dewey opts for a shift from the traditional understanding of education to “progressive education.” This means that we rely on practical experiences of studied subjects. At the same time he cautions that, “Education and experience cannot be directly equated to each other” (p.25). Therefore, the quality of experience is not to be taken for granted because “the effects of experience is not borne on its face” (p.27) value but from deep interaction of social effect with the transformation on/inside the student. This is similar to what Nigerian educators argue for when they call for a retrieval of child education pedagogies that are basic to traditional Nigerian society whereby children are taught through cultural techniques that are embedded in their worldview. These may involve employing proverbs, riddles, folktales and myths to impart moral lessons (Esere, Idowu & Omotosho 2011; Asue 2012).
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Civic virtue in a Christian mind : Charles Rollin and the Jansenist influence on the revival of classical virtue in France

Civic virtue in a Christian mind : Charles Rollin and the Jansenist influence on the revival of classical virtue in France

Rollin’s fondness for the virtue of the ancients in no way compromised his devotion to Augustinian principles. Throughout his writings, he drew a distinction between right manners and civic virtue on the one hand, and true Christian faith and Grace on the other. In the third volume of his Treatise on Education, Rollin, quoting Augustine, clearly made the distinction between these two states: “without true piety, that is, without knowledge and love of the true God, there can be no real virtue… [but] these [civic] virtues, though false and imperfect, do still enable those who have them to render greater service to the public than if they did not have them.” 48 It was therefore “false virtues” that Rollin attributes to the ancient Pagans, but virtues still that enabled the ancients to act in the interest of the public good, rather than out of self-interest. In describing these virtues in the manner in which he did, Rollin was not undermining the preeminence of Christianity, but proposing a set of ideals of immense social utility at a time when “mistakes and false prejudices” dominated the social fabric.
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