Collaborative Language Learning

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Are We Ready? A Case Study of Technology-enhanced, Collaborative Language Learning

Are We Ready? A Case Study of Technology-enhanced, Collaborative Language Learning

Abstract -- Technology Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) refers to any technology used in the classroom, such as videos, audio recorders or even entire language labs. In collaborative learning, students work together as members of a learning community, engaged in activities such as working on a problem- solving task by questioning each other, and discussing and sharing information. What is the relationship between technology and collaboration, and how can technology best be integrated into collaborative language learning? This paper examines the notion of collaborative learning. A case study was conducted to examine how the use of technology-enhanced, collaborative language learning could enable students to work collaboratively in a university context. Participants, constituting a range of students in a variety of majors at the University of Tasmania, were invited to complete a questionnaire to present their views on this style of learning and how they perceive technology-enhanced language learning.
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Speak English : a collaborative language learning system using design thinking in second language education : an exegesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Design Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

Speak English : a collaborative language learning system using design thinking in second language education : an exegesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Design Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

Speak English: A Collaborative Language Learning System Using Design Thinking in Second Language Education.. An exegesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degre[r]

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SMOKE DETECTION BASED ON IMAGE PROCESSING BY USING GREY AND TRANSPARENCY 
FEATURES

SMOKE DETECTION BASED ON IMAGE PROCESSING BY USING GREY AND TRANSPARENCY FEATURES

Within the current pedagogical paradigm of English as a foreign language (EFL) education, the notion of scaffolding has been significant as the sociocultural principle of collaborative and supportive learning. Scaffolding was originally identified as the support offered by teachers in supporting learners to reach a higher level of their learning performance [4] [5]. Later, the support shared among learners was included to re- conceptualize the concept of scaffolding in more collaborative structure of learning [6]. The concept of scaffolding was further extended with the development of technology and its integration in educational fields. Educational technology and web- based learning resources have created a potential for collaborative learning within powerful learning environment [7] [8]. Learner collaboration can be realized through task-based language learning performance. Providing learners with technology- enhanced language learning tasks and activities has developed in great popularity because EFL learners can develop positive interdependence while they are engaged in sharing mutual scaffolding and collaborative learning experiences. Task-based collaborative language learning has been implemented as significant components in EFL education by promoting positive interdependence among language learners, creating innovation in school curriculum and designing course syllabus in EFL institutions around the world.
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<p>Case-Based Curriculum With Integrated Smartphone Applications Improves Internal Medicine Resident Knowledge Of Contraceptive Care</p>

<p>Case-Based Curriculum With Integrated Smartphone Applications Improves Internal Medicine Resident Knowledge Of Contraceptive Care</p>

Methods: Our curriculum was delivered in a two-hour session as part of the mandatory ambula- tory curriculum for internal medicine interns at our institution in the academic year 2017 – 2018. Interns were provided with select online resources and two smartphone applications at the begin- ning of the session, which they then used in case-based small group work. Small group work was followed by a large group case review, co-facilitated by OB/GYN and internal medicine faculty. Results: Thirty-eight participants completed surveys assessing knowledge of and comfort with contraceptive care immediately before and after the curriculum; 20 participants com- pleted surveys assessing the same domains 4 – 6 months after the curriculum. Data from surveys administered immediately post-curriculum demonstrated signi fi cant improvements in knowledge about and comfort with counseling about, assessing medical eligibility for, and initiating multiple forms of contraception. Many of these improvements in knowledge and comfort were maintained on follow-up surveys 4 – 6 months following the curriculum. Conclusion: Our case-based curriculum with integrated smartphone applications resulted in signi fi cant improvements in internal medicine resident knowledge of and comfort with the key skills of contraceptive care. In contrast to active, collaborative learning methodologies such as the fl ipped classroom, our methodology supports active, collaborative learning without requiring advance learner preparation, and is thus well suited to the time constraints of the graduate medical education setting. Our methodology is readily translatable to other clinical topics and residency curricula.
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Addressing Foreign Language Learning Anxiety with Facebook

Addressing Foreign Language Learning Anxiety with Facebook

Through an action research intervention, the present study aimed to improve as much as possible on the aqui- sition situation by addressing issues of affect. Krashen posited that the Affective Filter prevents students from being in an optimal attitude for the input to “reach the part of the brain responsible for language acquisition” (2009, p. 31). Consequently, reducing anxiety and increasing motivation and self-confidence limit the Affective Filter which prevents a sufficient level of input from contributing to acquisition. In the present study, the inter- vention is relevant to affect in four ways. First, using tools and a familiar environment which the students viewed as motivating stimulated them to interact, access and share learning material. Consequently, a reduction of the Affective Filter was able to boost distribution. Second, the development of an online community of prac- tice where students readily communicate in the target language lowered anxiety and increased self-confidence, thus lowering the Affective Filter. Third, empowering the students with some level of control over the distribu- tion process was able to positively impact affect, particularly self-confidence. Fourth, as Krashen (2009) has de- fended, a reduction in the Affective Filter provided an increased level of input and thus facilitated acquisition of the foreign language.
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An exploration of correlative elements to support cognitive advancement in the design of collaborative learning tools

An exploration of correlative elements to support cognitive advancement in the design of collaborative learning tools

In our model, forming learning groups refers to assigning individual learners into groups for a particular collaborative learning activity. An individual learner desires to participate in friendship and interest groups, but members of an indi- vidual group are expected to be competent to accomplish the learning activity. It has to be ensured therefore that each learning group is formed in such a way that it meets the aspirations both of the individual learner and of the other members in the group. The grouping is based on their characteristics and the social relations with other learners. In our implementation, computational trust and reputation models are built up based on learners’ characteristics and the social relations between them. We can derive similar mechanisms for calculating the reputation of learners from the ReGreT trust and reputation model [31], but in our approach, we use a Trust Agent to maintain the reputation values of the learners. This centralized approach which is different from ReGreT, has the risk of losing some context information from individual Learner Agents, but this is beyond the focus of our study. A higher reputation of a learner indicates a higher tendency that other learners will cooperate with that learner. The constraints for selecting the characteristics and reputation values for constituting an optimal learning group are addressed by the implementation process.
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Design and Implementation of Web Based Collaborative Learning Model for ICT Course of College Student in Bangladesh

Design and Implementation of Web Based Collaborative Learning Model for ICT Course of College Student in Bangladesh

This application provides a discussion board for collaborate discussion. The member of expert team is the permanent member of discussion board. Learners who want to join the discussion board firstly have to sign in for permission. All rules of collaborate learning are maintained during discussion. Synchronous or real-time chats provide learners with one of the few online experiences in which they can receive immediate replies to their questions or comments, thereby allowing for a conversation to develop with the spontaneity of the traditional classroom [12]. Asynchronous discussions (normally in online bulletin or discussion boards) offer the opportunity for learners and instructors to carry on a conversation at convenient times. Because of each participant in the discussion may select a time to reply to the latest addition to the conversation, the flexibility in pace and length of the conversation can vary greatly.
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Student and Teacher Perceptions of First Language Use in Secondary French Immersion Mathematics Classrooms

Student and Teacher Perceptions of First Language Use in Secondary French Immersion Mathematics Classrooms

Teacher use of the second language. Most students (eight out of 10) mentioned that they believed that the teacher’s use of the L2 to instruct mathematics did not affect their learning to a great degree. For example, Paul (EFI student) suggested, “whether you learn math in English or French … it’s kind of universal either way … it’s a lot of, you know, numbers and diagrams and things like that.” Moreover, Andrew (EFI student) differentiated between his language comprehension and his mathematics comprehension when he said, “It wasn’t the language, it was the math that I didn’t get right off the bat.” Similarly, all four teachers made some statement about how they felt that (in the case of struggling students in particular) language was not the key issue or, at least, not the only issue. In other words, they felt that presenting the mathematics content in students’ L2 was not the main factor when it came to comprehension. “For the most part [hesitation], the language isn’t the issue. For some it might be, but I think that’s a small portion … often the problem is difficulty with the math concepts” (M. Parker, teacher). Interestingly, these kinds of statements on the part of students and teachers point toward an underlying perception of mathematics and language as being truly separate entities. The perception that mathematics is “numbers and diagrams”, and that students can understand the language but not the mathematics, or vice versa, suggests a separation between mathematics and language.
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Need for emotional language learning: a review

Need for emotional language learning: a review

English Language has been around in the world for over 14 centuries now. It has adapted itself accordingly with the demands of every civilization that it passed through and gradually became the most spoken language across the globe. Ability to speak English will undoubtedly help an individual reach and connect with more people. However, despite it being the most prevailed language in the history of humankind, English unknowingly formed a cloud around itself that somehow started intimidating people with English as their Second Language or Foreign Language (ESFL). Many strategies have been devised so far to ameliorate those hurdles for ESFL speakers, most of which reaped little to no success. Language, like stated above, was invented to have a greater sense of understanding between people who communicate with each other. This understanding happens only when the language is associated with an emotion i.e. Emotional Language. Emotional Language, when effectively used, leads to Emotional bonding and connect. (Challa, 2017) Emotional Language Teaching is the need of the hour. And English, in all its glory, is something that must be acquired rather than learnt to be one’s Emotional Language. This short communication is a humble attempt to reach out to all the teachers who are willing to go an extra mile to educate their rural students in the most unique and interactive way possible, for their betterment and for providing them with edutainment oriented acquisition useful for holistic development.
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The Evidence for The Effectiveness of Active Learning

The Evidence for The Effectiveness of Active Learning

There are pitfalls for engineering faculty hoping to pick up an article or two to see if active learning works. In particular, readers must clarify what is being studied and how the authors measure and interpret what “works.” The former is complicated by the wide range of methods that fall under the name of active learning, but can be simplified by focusing on core elements of common active learning methods. Assessing “what works” requires looking at a broad range of learning outcomes, interpreting data carefully, quantifying the magnitude of any reported improvement and having some idea of what constitutes a “significant” improvement. This last will always be a matter of interpretation, although it is helpful to look at both statistical measures such as effect sizes and absolute values for reported learning gains. No matter how data is presented, faculty adopting instructional practices with the expectation of seeing results similar to those reported in the literature should be aware of the practical limitations of educational studies. Educational studies tell us what worked, on average, for the populations examined and learning theories suggest why this might be so. However, claiming that faculty who adopt a specific method will see similar results in their own classrooms is simply not possible. Even if faculty master the new instructional method, they can not control all other variables that affect learning. The evidence for activelearning
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Learning literacies through collaborative enquiry; collaborative enquiry through learning literacies

Learning literacies through collaborative enquiry; collaborative enquiry through learning literacies

In the third year of development, 2009/10, apart from the educational need to address the limitations mentioned above, the lecturer concerned was due to go on research leave for the duration of the second semester. This meant that a means of delivering the module needed to be found taking into consideration both of these factors. This practical exigency led the lecturer to reflect on workshops she had previously attended on the benefits of group work, peer-assisted learning, enquiry-based learning and students teaching each other to enhance their own learning (in colloquial terms, the old adage “teaching is learning something twice”). In one sense, the reality of the situation compelled a new approach to the module; however, the resultant wiki project was at the same time a decision well informed by pedagogical theory, since both the nature of assessment and content delivery had to be changed and improved.
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Journal Of Legal Education Publishes New Issue

Journal Of Legal Education Publishes New Issue

57. See Mullins, supra note 31, at 65-57. Mullins observes that, on a typical quiz, students would be rewarded only for determining the correct answer. In contrast, the IF-AT sheets offer “a sliding scale of rewards instead of a one-shot deal [which] keeps the students engaged in the learning process through the entirety of each question.” This encourages learning because, for law student who are encountering new conceptual frameworks and skills, “the underlying message of sliding-scale scoring is an important one: Not getting it right on the first try is not failure. Rather, with hard work and persistence, they can reach the right answer and reap some reward when they do reach it.” Id.
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Integration of Education Technologies (Digital Storytelling) and Sociocultural Learning to Enhance Active Learning in Higher Education

Integration of Education Technologies (Digital Storytelling) and Sociocultural Learning to Enhance Active Learning in Higher Education

Every sphere of contemporary society has been touched by technology, including higher education. For a long time, higher education was known for its delayed response to change and adoption of innovations, but the current computer technology revolution has significantly diminished that stereotype. The long-held view in higher education of technological and scientific innovation as the exclusive province of academic research has changed; it is now being used to support the business and administrative processes and operations of colleges and universities, to carry out research, and to improve teaching and learning. In their efforts to equip college graduates with the skills needed to compete with the emerging knowledge economy, academic institutions are using existing and emerging technologies, as employers are looking for ‘technologically navy’ alumni (Chisholm, Carey, & Hernandez, 2002).
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LEAN-GREEN MANUFACTURING: COLLABORATIVE CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND ENGINEERING COURSES

LEAN-GREEN MANUFACTURING: COLLABORATIVE CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND ENGINEERING COURSES

Lean and Green manufacturing processes aim at achieving lower material and labour costs, while reducing impacts on the environment, and promoting sustainability as a whole. This paper reports on a pilot experiment with higher education and engi- neering students, exploring the full potential of a collaborative approach on courses integrating the Portuguese Polytechnic of Castelo Branco engineering studies curricula, while simultaneously improving their pro Þ ciency in English. Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) has become a key area of curricular innovation since it is known for improving both language and content teacher and student motivation. In this context, instructional design for CLIL entailed tandem work of content (engineer- ing) and language (English) teacher to design learning sequences and strategies. This allowed students to improve not only their language skills in English but also their knowledge in the speci Þ c engineering domain content on green and lean manufactur- ing processes.
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Learner’s Use of First Language in EFL Collaborative Learning: A Sociocultural View

Learner’s Use of First Language in EFL Collaborative Learning: A Sociocultural View

Scott and de la Fuente's (2008) qualitative study investigated the use of L1 during a collaborative consciousness-raising, form-focused task. The study used English speaking university students studying French or Spanish. The researchers analysed participants’ recorded interactions during their pair work and data from recalled protocols. Some groups were allowed the use of L1, while some groups were told to use only L2. The researchers observed that learners who were required to use L2 during the task talked to themselves in the L1 as they translated the text, recalled grammar rules, reviewed the task, and planned what to say in L2. They reported that students who used L1 engaged in smooth, continuous interaction; whereas, the interactions of students who used L2 were characterized by frequent pauses and fragmented interaction. They also reported that students who used L1 participated nearly equally in the interaction while the conversation in all pairs of students who used L2 was unbalanced, with one student dominating it. The unbalanced interaction inhibited their capacity to engage in collaborative dialogue and students were less successful to work on the task. The degree to which the students in two groups used metalinguistic terminology was another difference reported by the researchers.
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COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: AN EXPERIENCE

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: AN EXPERIENCE

NOV-DEC, 2012, VOL- I, ISSUE-III www.srjis.com Page 769 their individual cognitions with each other and make decisions built upon the accumulation of these ‘individual cognitions’ .Collaborative learning processes emphasize searching for and constructing common meaning beyond individual knowledge and subjective meaning while working cooperatively on the same learning tasks. In this process, students define their objectives. Then they outline the project/task plan, and research and design the product. They finalize their products after solving the problems that may arise during the production stage. Group products can be material or verbal. Material products such as posters, written reports or objects facilitate interaction because students can refer to parts of the product that they are constructing. The products provide a joint working space on which the results of joint thinking can be made visible. When students are simultaneously involved in the same task and must achieve a common goal, there is a need for them to communicate, share ideas, coordinate and negotiate meaning (Kimber, 1996).Van den Bossche et al. (2006) say that collaborative processes start with the articulation of personal meaning, and other team members give explanations by using this understanding. If accepted, the offered meaning can become part of the common meaning. However, the team members may diverge in their interpretation and tackle the situation from different perspectives. The team will benefit if divergence in meaning leads to future negotiation. Through this negotiation by argument and clarification, the team works toward a convergence of meaning. The existence of co-construction and constructive conflict in the interaction of the team influences the development of shared ideas positively. Studies show that the effect of collaborative learning depends upon multiple conditions such as the group composition (size, age, gender, heterogeneity and others), the task features and the communication media etc . Keeping mind all these literature and researches, to prepare a design for cooperative learning and to tryout the same on M Ed student were the main objectives of the study.
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A Survey on Collaborative Learning Framework Using Cloud Computing

A Survey on Collaborative Learning Framework Using Cloud Computing

In collaborative learning, shared learning experiences allow learners to engage in discussion, converse with other learners, and present or defend ideas, which enhances not only interaction among learners, but also critical thinking and problem-solving skills (Armstrong & Hyslop-Margison, 2010; Kuo & Belland, 2016; Kuo, Walker, Belland & Schroder, 2013; Gokhale, 2013; Smith & MacGregor, 2014). At its core, collaborative learning is learner-centered. But it additionally involves multiple students working together to accomplish common goals. Collaboration can be facilitated with various forms of communication in face-to-face or computer-supported settings (Laal & Laal, 2012). Blogs support collaborative learning by enhancing knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing, and reflective processes (Wang, 2010; Yang & Chang, 2012). For example, Wang (2010) investigated students‟ perceptions of utilizing blogs as a platform for content review, data collection, and idea sharing in collaborative groups. Students perceived that blogs (a) are a useful tool to reflect and interact with classmates, and (b) enlarged the resources of learning support. Yang and Chang (2012) examined the influence of integrating blogs as supplementary tools on student learning in a traditional instructor-led class. Blogging was found to be a medium that enhances asynchronous peer interaction, reflection, and positive attitudes toward academic achievement in collaborative activities.
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A Three-Step Model for Designing Initial Second Life-Based Foreign Language Learning Activities

A Three-Step Model for Designing Initial Second Life-Based Foreign Language Learning Activities

Task-based learning. Task-based learning has been a staple in foreign language teaching practices (Carless, 2002; Huang, 2010; Slimani-Rolls, 2005) with the purpose of stimulating the second language acquisition process (Ellis, 2003; Kiernan & Aizawa, 2004; Skehan, 1993).Task- based learning incorporates activities that respect "transfer-appropriate processing and other positive features of communicative practices" (Segalowitz, 2003, p. 402) to help provide learners with the means to creatively apply previous acquired knowledge in new communicative contexts (De Ridder, Vangehuchten, & Gόmez, 2007; Slimani-Rolls, 2005). SL is also considered an appropriate environment to assign task-based learning activities by researchers (e.g., Hislope, 2008; Wang, Song, Xia, & Yan, 2009). The task-based approach may also reduce SL's chances of crashing. Garrett (1991) suggests two criteria for evaluating technology-based, language- learning materials. One of them is whether the program runs properly without crashing. The running of SL software requires hardware specification and high-speed broadband connections. Therefore, in a situation where students are gathered together in a computer lab to use SL, SL may freeze or crash easily due to fighting for limited bandwidth (Foster, 2007; Stevens, 2006; Swaine, 2007; Wang, Song, Xia, & Yan, 2009). This problem could be even worse for computer labs in language departments because they usually do not require computers for their instructional needs that have the necessary specifications for running virtual words, such as SL. The task-based learning approach, on the other hand, possibly allows students to work on their own schedules or in small groups, instead of having to gather all together in a computer lab. As a result, this approach reduces the chances that students are using SL at the same time. Students can even install SL on their own computers (e.g., Jarmon et al., 2008) to get
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How do Learners Make Use of a Space for Self-Directed Learning? Translating the Past, Understanding the Present, and Strategizing for the Future

How do Learners Make Use of a Space for Self-Directed Learning? Translating the Past, Understanding the Present, and Strategizing for the Future

Around week nine the students started manifesting their classroom network online by posting their pictures taken with their classmates on Facebook and leaving comments about their good relationships with them. I observed the students decorating the classroom walls with cards on which they had written Japanese words. They also made a confectionery corner by using a shelf in the classroom to store sweets and other snacks. I took this as a sign that the students had, perhaps through the above activities, finally begun to feel comfortable in the learning space. Indeed, by decorating the walls and leaving their belongings, it could be said that they had taken ownership of the space.
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The Collaborative learning handbook: A Best practices guide

The Collaborative learning handbook: A Best practices guide

1.3 Collaborative Learning and Global Software Development 1.4 Fractals and Collaborative Learning 12 1.5 The Collaborative 13 1.6 Phases of the 6 Learning Cycle Overview Learning Cycle [r]

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