Communication and Theology

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Towards a Theology of Mission in the New Media Age

Towards a Theology of Mission in the New Media Age

Peter Horsfield observed that one of the major transformations after the failure of modernity’s claim of disenchantment is a movement away from institutional-based religion towards autonomous, non-institutional spirituality that is serviced and networked by the public media. 26 The Internet afforded a new platform for seeking information about God and spiritual nourishment beyond the church’s language and environment. More instances are being observed today where people were converted through the Internet that could not have otherwise happened in an institutional context due to certain circumstances—physical distance, bureaucratic and formal environment of the church which did not allow for a more intimate relationship with a prospective believer. These institutional limitations are negated by the new media environment: The Internet can reach the potential believer right at their very home; the Internet can offer a more personal experience, and the Internet can facilitate an interactive communication between the missionary and the potential believer. Some, who wish to return to the church or want to be baptized in the church, have chosen the internet over the more formal program like RCIA which they often found as cumbersome and user-unfriendly. An example of this is Michael Belzer’s description of the experiences of returnees to Catholic Church in Germany: “[A] growing number of people who want to return to the Church take their first step through the Internet. Shame and other reservations are more easily overcome this way and the first steps can be done
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The shape of Torrance theology

The shape of Torrance theology

[…] but with God and man as they are posited together in a movement of creative self-communication by the Word of God. […] A profound reciprocity is created in which God addresses His Word to man by giving it human form without any diminishment of its divine reality as God Himself speaks it, and in which He enables man to hear His Word and respond to it without any cancellation of his human mode of being. [...] Thus the Word of God communicated to man includes within itself meeting between man and God as well as meeting between God and man, for in assuming the form of human speech the Word of God spoken to man becomes at the same time the word of man in answer to God. 44
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Theology disrupted: Doing theology with children in African contexts

Theology disrupted: Doing theology with children in African contexts

3.In some societies once the man discovers that the woman is pregnant he may not sleep with her until few weeks or month after birth. Obviously this has little to do with physical considerations but the woman is regarded as religiously or ceremonially unclean at this time. To the Ingessana people of Sudan – once a woman is pregnant she goes back to her home until few weeks/months after delivery. This is a religious affair … the first born baby must be born at his/her mother’s place. For the Mao people of Kenya – once a woman is pregnant there is no direct communication between husband and wife (Mahlangu 2014:34).All these beliefs and rituals indicate the significance of the birth of a ‘child’ and the fact that even before he/she is born ‘religious’ ceremonies are observed. Thus this birth of a child and childhood process in Africa are a religious process in which the child is constantly flooded with religious activities and an attitude starting long before it is born. A child not only continues the physical line of life but becomes involved in intense religious activities. Hence, the physical aspects of birth and the ceremonies that accompany pregnancy, birth and childhood, are regarded with religious feeling and experience – that another being has been born into a profoundly religious community and religious world.
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Fall 2018 Enrollment

Fall 2018 Enrollment

Performing & Media Arts PAMA Communication, Fine and Performing Arts Fine & Performing Arts 3. Philosophy PHIL Philosophy & Theology Philosophy 12[r]

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The Globalisation of Theology

The Globalisation of Theology

These few examples suffice to show that we are on the threshold of what I would want to call ‘collaborative theology’ in which the most fundamental presuppositions of each tradition would be debated across institutional boundaries in much the same way as doctrinal matters have been within the traditions, except that now, instead of being taken for granted as data of revelation or self-evident truths, these presuppositions would be mutually challenged at the deepest level. Only communication partners with a mature level of trust could undertake such a project. This might well take place in a spirit of competition, but even in the midst of conflict space needs to be made for this further reflection, for by expanding the context of conflict in this way and drawing on the deepest resources of each side even violent conflict can be resolved by the parties to the conflict themselves. 31 But, to borrow a remark of the recently deceased former Irish prime minister Garret FitzGerald, ‘That’s all very well in practice, but how would it work in theory?’ The hard intellectual work of reconciling fundamentally opposed religious viewpoints remains. It is no solution to achieve this in the abstract in ways which actual religious believers cannot accept. One does not compose hymns to abstractions, nor can they console the grieving or inspire hope in the suffering. The task for collaborative theology is not just to ‘mention’, but to ‘use’ religious language in all its particularity in ways which gradually expand its field of reference so that it is understood beyond the cultural boundaries of determinate traditions. This is not just a matter of finding ‘common ground’; indeed, ‘common’ ground only too often turns out to reflect the basic doctrines of one of the parties to the discussion.
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Theology disrupted: Doing theology with children in African contexts

Theology disrupted: Doing theology with children in African contexts

3.In some societies once the man discovers that the woman is pregnant he may not sleep with her until few weeks or month after birth. Obviously this has little to do with physical considerations but the woman is regarded as religiously or ceremonially unclean at this time. To the Ingessana people of Sudan – once a woman is pregnant she goes back to her home until few weeks/months after delivery. This is a religious affair … the first born baby must be born at his/her mother’s place. For the Mao people of Kenya – once a woman is pregnant there is no direct communication between husband and wife (Mahlangu 2014:34).All these beliefs and rituals indicate the significance of the birth of a ‘child’ and the fact that even before he/she is born ‘religious’ ceremonies are observed. Thus this birth of a child and childhood process in Africa are a religious process in which the child is constantly flooded with religious activities and an attitude starting long before it is born. A child not only continues the physical line of life but becomes involved in intense religious activities. Hence, the physical aspects of birth and the ceremonies that accompany pregnancy, birth and childhood, are regarded with religious feeling and experience – that another being has been born into a profoundly religious community and religious world.
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What hope is there for South Africa? A public theological reflection on the role of the church as a bearer of hope for the future

What hope is there for South Africa? A public theological reflection on the role of the church as a bearer of hope for the future

churches were committed to their common struggle against apartheid, has lost most of its appeal and influence’. The aforementioned article by Forster (2014) draws on research conducted among Christians across South Africa that shows that with the demise of traditional ecumenical structures new groupings have emerged in an attempt to fulfil this vital social and public role of the church. Examples of such movements are the Religious Leaders Forum, South African Christian Leaders Initiative (SACLI), Unashamedly Ethical, Transformation Africa, and most recently the controversial ForSA movement. Of course many denominations continue to be active in their prophetic work and witness in the public sphere. One could cite many wonderful examples of projects that denominations and groupings are involved in that are having a significant impact on society. The SACLI, for example, were engaged in such important social action and witness when the office of the Public Protector, and other section 9 institutions that protect the constitution of South Africa, came under threat from the Presidency and the governing party (SAPA 2014). However, in terms of a theology of hope there is significant scope for greater partnership, particularly as it relates to engaging policy issues in South African society.
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White theology in dialogue with Black Theology: Exploring the contribution of Klippies Kritzinger

White theology in dialogue with Black Theology: Exploring the contribution of Klippies Kritzinger

Kritzinger asks this question as a theologian and, as indicated above, as a theologian committed to the church. A number of reasons might be considered for Kritzinger’s choice to focus on the church and Christians for re-evangelisation. Apart from the point already mentioned, that the church cannot call for change in society if it does not embody that change in its own life, Kritzinger also believes that not only Christians but all people from all religions (and those who are not religious) should work towards the reconstruction of South Africa (Kritzinger 1991:112). His suggestion for the task of Missiology is also a focus on religious communities in general (not only Christian churches) as agents of change in society (Kritzinger 1995:368). As a theologian listening to Black Theology, he then views this task as a particular personal and ethical responsibility: he needs to work toward changing the white church to contrast a racist culture, assuming that others will do the same in their spheres of influence.
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Political Theology Versus Public Theology:  Reclaiming the Heart of Christian Mission

Political Theology Versus Public Theology: Reclaiming the Heart of Christian Mission

At the same time that the secularization thesis had begun to be undermined, churches began to seriously analyze their relationship with the modern world and their place within it. There was the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), The World Council of Churches’ Conference on Church and Society in Geneva (1966), and the World Council of Churches’ Fourth Assembly in Uppsala (1968) where the place of theology in politics was front and centre. This occurred in conjunction with the work of theologians trying to come to grips with the Holocaust and the complicity of churches in those atrocities, along with Latin American churches, Bishops, and theologians, who insisted that the Gospel should be trans- forming the lives of the poor and marginalized in this world and not the next world. This work challenged societies that perpetuated the cycles of poverty and institutionalized in- justices. Also, at this time, black and feminist theologians began to critically analyze the institutional racism, sexism, and privilege present in both churches and the society in which they lived and were unwittingly sustaining. Phillips points to this collection of voices rising as marking “the beginning of political theology as a distinct theological discipline.” 39 It is
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Black theology in South Africa – A theology of human dignity and black identity

Black theology in South Africa – A theology of human dignity and black identity

It is because the cycle of oppression was not broken that the oppressed blacks have themselves become the new oppressors – 20 years after the apartheid struggle ended, the language of apartheid is still being used by the oppressed in the role of the oppressor to justify personal agendas of gain. The black theology that gave a new confidence and self- perception to black South Africans that they had control over their destiny has been replaced by agendas of personal greed. Black theology in South Africa has never had racism as its agenda. The roots of oppression lie deeper than racism so that while the end of apartheid is a welcome development along the way, it is not the end. It involves much more than the idea that the perception of inferiority has simply been replaced by access to economic and political resources. Rather, it is the ongoing stereotypes of the other as inferior that formulate a mythical or ideological construct which provides a rationale or justification for legal, social and political equality. This in turn gives the false impression that all problems of inequality will simply disappear with the attainment of economic and political equality. The unjust discrimination and oppression will simply continue and new oppressors will replace the old because the deeper-seated human dignity and identity has not been sufficiently addressed.
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Theology and higher education: The place of a Faculty of Theology at a South African university

Theology and higher education: The place of a Faculty of Theology at a South African university

In academic terms, Ukpong et al. (2002) indicates that epistemological preference is given to Western modes of intellectual production. To be accepted in the global world of academics one has to do things the Western way. There is no consideration for cultural differences. There should however be different ways of doing Theology. Theology should engage with society. This engagement should be according to a different epistemology that has been the case up till now. This ‘new epistemology’ should allow Theology to engage with social problems in order to change the way society exists. Theological education deriving from all over the world needs to be taken into account. Not only Western forms of Theology should be recognised. Maluleke (2001:142) suggests that Theology needs to start paying attention to African women Theology, Black Theology and Liberation Theology. The call is to acknowledge the legitimacy of all contextual theologies. All theologies should be seen as contextual theologies. When doing Theology in Africa, it must be Africa which must inform Theology on how to do contextual Theology. Kombo (2013:101) describes the historic development of Theological Education in Africa. He indicates how Theological Education during the colonial period delivered a trained skilled elite class that was ill prepared for the questions the African context produced. Theological Education according to Kombo (2013:105) will have to break with the past (implying the colonial era and Western Theology) and focus on the African reality. Maluleke (2006:69) indicates how the process of Africanisation of Theology can be cosmetic in the sense that Africans remain the consumers of Theology produced by Westerners. Africans must become the theological educators. Until this happens, Theology and religious education will remain foreign to the African context (Maluleke 2006:71). Theology done by Africans in Africa has relevance to the context.
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Making Theology Accessible: Empowering Christians to do their own Theology

Making Theology Accessible: Empowering Christians to do their own Theology

The sense of resignation corresponds to the enormity of this task. It is not a task to be achieved through the willpower of one individual in a church, although a gifted individual with a strong connection to a congregation may open new ideas one step at a time. Rather than being realised in a few individual churches, however, the task of making theology accessible requires the concerted action of those with power and motivation to intentionally act on a faith-wide scale. It is a task that would require considerable effort, planning and struggle. It would require a commitment to publish not for profit or prestige, but out of pastoral and spiritual concern for the welfare of the church. The prospect is daunting, and yet that is the nature of working theology. It calls us to struggle with issues that sometimes feel too big, to ride out the waves that threaten to submerge our hope and faith for a greater possibility. There is no single answer book or forty-day process. The simplest part of the answer is that we must intentionally commit to finding an outcome, and that may not be so simple at all.
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What is the significance of poetry for theology today?

What is the significance of poetry for theology today?

re-state dogma. The poetry makes them memorable. In churches today there is much debate about the function of liturgy: is it to instruct the congregation, to enable them to express religious emotion, to produce an uplifting performance, to enable corporate prayer, or is it aimed directly towards God and the congregation is unimportant? Probably most liturgists would answer that all of the above have a part to play and that liturgy should try to fulfil all these aims. This is a tall order, and liturgies being written today, whether set liturgies or services being devised by a minister for a particular occasion, tend to overbalance either towards wordy theology or over-poetic expression – sometimes both within the same service. The best solution is probably clarity and poetic simplicity; this may need a talented poet to achieve it. As a lifelong Anglican, I still consider that some of Cranmer’s work in the Book of Common Prayer is possibly the best liturgy written in English; but the English of four hundred years ago will not do for today. Poets are needed for the writing of modern worship.
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Swart Teologie en Suid Afrika se kairós

Swart Teologie en Suid Afrika se kairós

tiese Teologie mettertyd as benaming gaan oomeem, weet ek nie en dit sal nog gesien moet word. Dat dit 'n meer aanvaarbare terminologie is wat 'n beter kans staan om ook politieke revolusies te oorleef, is seker waar. Interessant is die begrip 'kontekstualiteit' in die benaming van die instansie wat die Kairos-teoloë verteenwoordig en wat miskien die kem van hulle teologiese oortuiging uitmaak: Institute for Contextual Theology. Wat verder waar is, is dat die dokument, veral in sy konsep- hersiening (wat ek eers einde Augustus 1986 te siene gekiy het), minder 'Swart-Teologies' is as die aanvanklike teologiese uitinge. Trouens, dit wil my voorkom asof die tweede uitgawe van die Kairos Dokument betekenisvolle aanpassings in die rigting van versigtiger formulerings gemaak het, 'n gemis wat waarskynlik talle mense weer- hou het van 'n aanvanklike onderskrywing van die dokument. O p die oomblik stel die welslae van die Kairos Dokument binne- en buite- lands egter beslis die Swart Teologie in die skadu.
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Theology and Christian discipleship

Theology and Christian discipleship

Words have a sparkle as well as a meaning. For many Christians today the word ‘discipleship’ – a notion that has a very wide range of meanings – has a very positive sparkle. It captures a sense of personal commitment, of life as a movement of growth and learning, and seems to fit very well with a sense of belonging within a church that imagines itself as the pilgrim people of God. ‘Theology,’ by contrast, has little sparkle; indeed, it seems a dull word relating to a rather boring and obscure academic pursuit. Indeed, it is not only dull and boring, but seems to be disappearing! A few years ago there were many places in the British Isles where one could study theology. But as money gets tighter (I, however, cannot remember when it was not!) and church structures contract (often linked to a shortage of clergy / members of religious orders), the number of places facilitating theological reflection is declining sharply. But are we losing anything of real importance? I believe the whole People of God as affected by this contraction, so the purpose of this paper is to look at a series of situations – scenes that confront us as Catholic Christians every day – and argue that looking at them with the resources of theological speculation can help us to do three things.
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[Z420.Ebook] Fee Download Critical Reflections On Stanley Hauerwas Theology Of Disability Disabling Society Enabling Theology By John Swinton.pdf

[Z420.Ebook] Fee Download Critical Reflections On Stanley Hauerwas Theology Of Disability Disabling Society Enabling Theology By John Swinton.pdf

Dr. Hauerwas has always been a fearless voice in the field of theology. Critical Reflections on Stanley Hauerwas’ Theology of Disability: Disabling Society, Enabling Theology presents his work on the true meaning of disability and provides critical multidisciplinary discussions about his challenging ideas and their validity. In his essays, Hauerwas discusses his views on issues such as the social construction of developmental disabilities, the experience of profound developmental disabilities in relation to liberal society, and the community as the “hermeneutic of the gospel.” Included is a new essay by Dr. Hauerwas responding to the contributors to the book.
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Political Theology Revisited

Political Theology Revisited

liberation’; the year of Dorothee Sölle’s ‘political night prayer’ in Cologne cathedral; the year in which the civil rights movement in Northern Ireland came to a head and precipitated the Troubles. It was my first full year in Europe. When I began studying for a doctorate at the Faculty of Catholic Theology in the University of Münster in 1969, even in this stuffily conservative setting there were strikes, sit-ins, disruptions of lectures and demonstrations. It thus seemed to respond to the need of the hour when Johann Baptist Metz, the Professor of Fundamental Theology, proclaimed the necessity of a ‘political theology’ which would act as a critical corrective to the widespread tendency to treat religion as a private matter that had no business in politics and the public sphere. Now, over 40 years later, it is perhaps appropriate to take a new look at political theology and ask whether it has retained its relevance. I do this as the preface to an appreciation of Geraldine Smyth’s contribution to peacebuilding in the fraught religio-political situation of Northern Ireland.
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Pragmatic Holiness in the Early Salvation Army: A Theology of Holiness as Action

Pragmatic Holiness in the Early Salvation Army: A Theology of Holiness as Action

We see surfacing here references to self-denial through vulnerability. This is where the connection with pragmatic holiness is the clearest. Charles G. Haws states that “Ubuntu enables genuine community because it confesses a universal vulnerability. Since individuals remain incomplete apart from community, they are vulnerably dependent upon other human beings. Both in community and holiness, the willingness to embrace loss, or the possibility thereof, is a key to growth. Tutu in his commentary strikes on the main balancing point; there can and must be a willingness to embrace loss, and to sacrifice and deny oneself, for the glory of God and the betterment of my neighbor, because there is within true community, which mirrors the Godhead, a fullness that can only come from a realization that one is a part of something far greater then oneself.” Ubuntu can be justly asserted to be, as Haws sees things, the “corrective hermeneutic to the individualism of the West.” Charles G. Haws, “Suffering, Hope and Forgiveness” Scottish Journal of Theology 62, no.4 (2009): 481-485.
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Coorelation, Conversation, Contrast: Applications of an Australian contextual theology

Coorelation, Conversation, Contrast: Applications of an Australian contextual theology

Culture is supposed to be the bearer of that which ignites the sacred energy of truth. If a culture does not facilitate the intersection of individual stories with the ancient stories then it is failing in its primary role, for this intersection is where the ignition of the sacred energy of truth takes place. Hence the subtitle of Carroll’s The Western Dreaming: the western world is dying for want of a story. Carroll has his own ideas about how current cultural phenomena invite intersections with sacred story and his is a discussion that we do not have the time to engage in here. Nevertheless, Carroll has posited a theory about the nature of the religious spirit outside of the traditional religions and embedded in secular culture that demands from theology a considered method of engagement. The religious spirit is emerging in new forms ‘over the back fence’ and is now situated far more predominantly outside of the church’s ‘backyard’. Is Carroll right to suggest that popular culture is not wholly sufficient to the task of igniting the energy of truth in modern western society? Theology has sometimes argued that this is the case. Theology often argues that culture is critiqued and corrected in reference to Christ. But the Christ of theology is traditionally the Christ of the Christian Church. If, as Carroll suggests, the power of the Christ story to transform culture now lies in the hands of the culture itself, should theology be engaging culture in conversation in order to discover there the nature of Christ in culture and if so, how does such a conversation take place?
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Žižek's Atheist Theology

Žižek's Atheist Theology

of modernity (including Marx, Freud and Nietzsche) as well as insights of French philosophy generated out of the late 1960’s (Lyotard, Derrida, Foucault, Deleuze, etc.). A first kind of postmodern theology, whose practitioners self-identify as Radical Orthodox, characterizes modernist logic as secular logic, and argues that the only way to critique modernity is from a theological perspective: to this end, the Radical Orthodoxy—including John Milbank, Graham Ward, and Catherine Pickstock—articulate an alternate modernity, one that is grounded in the participation of the Christian God (Smith 2004: 106). This type of theology is in no way atheistic as it assumes that acknowledging a living, transcendental God is the first step toward being able to engage in truly critical thought.
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