Constructivism and Its Applications

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Teachers Use of Technology and Constructivism

Teachers Use of Technology and Constructivism

used effectively in the classroom, teachers have to make sure that they are using it as part of an approach that involves the students in the activity. Constructivist approaches, with their focus on student-centered learning, have long advocated student involvement in the process of gaining knowledge and have sought ways for teachers to become advocates in the learning process rather than as figures who only dictate information. This approach seems to be a good match for the technological applications being developed today. While being an advocate of constructivism is not a requirement for the use of technology and while using technology will not necessarily convince someone to change from their traditional teaching approach, the two tend to increase the other, and provide the best results from both an application and a theoretical perspective. By using technology in a constructivist approach, teachers can involve students in learning activities, they can structure the instruction to meet different learning levels and styles, and they can broaden the range of resources that are available to the learner. This allows the technology to be more than just another way to present information; it becomes the system in which information is presented. Technology as part of a learning theory is more than a tool; it becomes the framework for the methodology. For those who are looking for ways to enhance their constructivist approach to instruction, technology provides the ability to support all of the central themes of this theory. Teachers are less hesitant to use technology because they can see that it helps them design their instruction in such a way that supports their theoretical approach. Using the two together – technology and constructivist theory – provides a better use and integration of technology tools into the classroom in an effective manner, while giving the teacher the tools necessary to effectively design an instructional model that meets the requirements of a student-centered focus.
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Constructivism and Curriculum Development

Constructivism and Curriculum Development

Constructivist learning environment is learner- centered, which is mainly based on problem- solving and hands on activities that require active engagement of cognitive processes. Constructivist education enables students to create new knowledge, going far beyond the mere acquiring of knowledge. In its weak applications, they end up with lower thinking skills with the help of the teacher who considerably lifts the burden of learning off the students. Jonassen et al. (1999), note the implications that implementing constructivism has on the role of teacher and student [10]. Specifically, students must wrestle with the responsibility that comes from being truly in charge of one’s own learning.
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Robotics & Constructivism in Education: the TERECoP project

Robotics & Constructivism in Education: the TERECoP project

The Spanish situation is similar to the previous ones, and the use of robotics in primary and secondary education is very limited and not official at all. In general there are a lot of activities in the field of Robotics in Spain mainly in research or industry ([19]) and there are also a few robot competitions organized ([20]). In some of these competitions the participants are secondary level students. It is also a fact that the different educational institutions (national and regional) are aware of introducing and using computer science & technology at schools ([21] in Catalonia, [22] in Madrid, [23] in Navarra or [24] as the national reference in Educational Computer Science & technology). Nevertheless it is quite difficult to find deep and complete experiences in Robotics & Education. Some of the relevant experiences are the use of LOGO (the approach is similar to ours) at school ([25]), some teachers’ initiatives like the project RESS (secondary level experience with LEGO done in 2003: [26]) or personal ones like the web page and materials from the “freelancer” Koldo Olaskoaga ([27]). We found two experiences close to our project; one in Educational Robotics done in Primary school level by Alfredo Rodrigálvarez Rebollo (Director of the public college “San Francisco de Cifuentes”, Guadalajara, Spain [28]) with an important effort in integrating these activities within the curricula; the other one carried out by the University of Alicante group called TEDDI, which works (among other research areas) in finding didactic applications of robotics at different levels in school ([29]).
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GPU Computing and Its Applications

GPU Computing and Its Applications

NVIDIA TESLA GPU acceleration offers financial service firms a competitive advantage by enabling applications, such as the widely deployed Monte Carlo simulation, to run faster. Calculating pricing and risk for compound options and OTC derivatives within seconds versus hours allows you to run more simulations thereby increasing the quality of results and more confidence in data.

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Cyberinfrastructure and its Applications

Cyberinfrastructure and its Applications

An instrument cyberinfrastructure that delivers high-end IT resources storage, computation, visualization, and data/service hosting - almost all of which are UNIX-based under the covers;[r]

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PARADIGM SHIFT FROM BEHAVIOURISM TO CONSTRUCTIVISM

PARADIGM SHIFT FROM BEHAVIOURISM TO CONSTRUCTIVISM

This is category of constructivism known as ―Psychological Constructivism‖. Psychological constructivism addresses the manner in which people learn. The basic premise being that knowledge is made, not acquired. Psychological constructivists do not focus on what should be known, but rather how it is known. Jean Piaget, a noted Swiss developmental psychologist, theorized that children construct knowledge from their actions on their environment The process of learning involves both the learner and the knowledge being learned. David Perkins (1999) identifies three roles for the learner. First is the learner who acquires knowledge actively. Second is the social learner who co-constructs knowledge in dialogue with others. Third, the creative learner needs to create or recreate knowledge for himself. Perkins also identifies three kinds of knowledge. First is inert knowledge that is gained by solving problems that make connections to the world. Second is ritual knowledge that is acquired via authentic problem solving and makes learning meaningful. Finally is the conceptually difficult knowledge, which is gained through inquiry that confront initial theories or prior knowledge. Through this better understanding of the process of learning, constructivism is then seen as a toolbox. Troublesome knowledge invites responses to fit the difficulties – there is not one standard constructivist fit.
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Reconciling Social Constructivism and Realism in GIS

Reconciling Social Constructivism and Realism in GIS

A history of very different methodologies between human geographers and the GIS community has limited the possibility for investigating social influences on GIS. Critics, while often well-versed in philosophical issues, were seldom equipped to analyze specific instances of GIS’ construction. Furthermore, there is an — albeit receding — history of mutual antagonism between objectives of the two groups (Schuurman 2000). The result has been that empirical research into social parameters of GIS has been overlooked. That gap is filled by this examination of ways in which GIS practices are established at the model, conceptual, and algorithmic levels. This paper differs from conventional epistemological assessments of GIS by closely scrutinizing the technology itself in order to demonstrate that the science incorporates — and often achieves — realist goals while remaining social in its construction for it articulates the relationship between social and digital parameters of GIS’ construction and argues that both are implicated in the development of the technology.
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Frames and its applications

Frames and its applications

The practical importantance of tight frame lies in the fact that they make the computation of the canocical dual frame which in the general case requires inversion of an operator and ap[r]

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SHIM and Its Applications

SHIM and Its Applications

Method and loop identifiers We repurpose yield points to identify methods and loops as a fine-grain software signal. JVMs use yield points to synchronize threads for activities such as garbage collection and locking. The compiler injects yield points into every method prologue, epilogue, and loop back edge. A very efficient yield point implementation performs a single write to a guard page [Lin et al., 2015]. When the VM needs to synchronize threads, it protects the guard page, causing all threads to yield as they fault on their next write to the protected page. Jikes RVM implements yield points with an explicit test rather than a guard page, so for this experiment we simply add to each yield point a write of its method or loop identifier, adding an average of 1% execution time overhead. We measure yield point frequency and find that the average period ranges from 14 ( jython ) to 140 ( avrora ) cycles. The evaluation uses a JVM configuration with the additional store, but without Shim, as the baseline. Shim increments a bucket in a method-and-loop-identifier histogram. We pre-size this histogram based on an earlier profile execution. These changes produce a low-cost, high-frequency software signal that identifies the fine-grain execution state.
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ITS HISTORY AND APPLICATIONS

ITS HISTORY AND APPLICATIONS

Schlesinger’s paper on product integration called Neue Grundlagen f¨ ur einen In- finitesimalkalkul der Matrizen [LS1] was published in 1931. The author links up to Volterra’s theory of product integral. He starts with the Riemann-type definition and establishes the basic properties of the product integral. His proofs are nev- ertheless original – while Volterra proved most of his statements using the Peano series expansion, Schlesinger prefers the “ε − δ” proofs. He then proceeds to define the Lebesgue product integral (as a limit of product integrals of step functions) and explores its properties.
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Biotechnology and its Applications

Biotechnology and its Applications

By using Molecular diagnosis. In this method, a single stranded DNA or RNA, tagged with a radioactive molecule 9probe0is allowed to hybridize to its complementary DNA in a clone cells followed by detection using autoradiography. The clone having mutated gene will notbe able to appear on photographic film, because the probe will not have complimentarity with mutaed gene.

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Nanomedicine and its applications

Nanomedicine and its applications

Debates also exist over whether nanomedicine has any unique ethical issues or the ethical issues of past technologies apply to nanoscience. Several nanoethicists have lately identified the need for 'better' ethics of emerging technologies and believed that researchers should consider ethical reflection as part and parcel of the research and development processes and should be transferred to nanomedicine. Therefore, it is essential to proactively address the ethical, social and regulatory aspects of nanomedicine in order to diminish its side effects on the environment and public health and also to avoid a public reaction. Ethical issues involving nanomedicine is helpful to decision makers, particularly employers, workers, investors, and health authorities. The ethical considerations involved in nanomedicine are related to risk assessment in general, somatic-cell versus germline-cell therapy, the enhancement of human capabilities, risk management of engineered nanomaterials, research into human embryonic stem cells [31]. For instance, recently, the identification of cytotoxicity of nanoparticles toward mammalian gremline stems cells has aroused great concern over the bio safety of nanomaterials. Ethical issues is a major concern in nanomedicine. If a computer chip is implanted in humans and this chip can diagnose diseases from which the person is suffering currently, it can also analyze our DNA to determine the diseases to which one may be susceptible to in future. Ethical issues concerning a patient’s right-toknow, right-not-to-know and the duty-to-know arises. The safety of nanomedicine has to be thoroughly examined due to their unpredictable nature, before coming to the trials in human [32].
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Wavelet and its Applications

Wavelet and its Applications

The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is an algorithm used for sampling a signal over a period of time or space dividing it into its frequency components. It requires a matrix whose order is the number of sample points . Multiplying an matrix by a vector will cost on the order of operations. This transform is called fast because we can do the same operation in ( ).

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Bioinformatics and its applications

Bioinformatics and its applications

Bioinformatics develops algorithms and biological software of computer to analyze and record the data related to biology for example the data of genes, proteins, drug [r]

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Constructivism and the role of institutions in international relations

Constructivism and the role of institutions in international relations

Lastly, language underlies also the understanding of the practical performative function of interpretation, so important for constructivists. First, if interpreta tion is central for the social sciences, constructivism asks for the effect this meaning-giving, in turn, has on the social world . Constru ctivists insist that there are a series of ‘institutional’ facts which ‘exist’ only because social actors agree, whethe r conscio usly or n ot, in giving a certain meaning to them. ‘Money’ – as distinguished from a sheet of paper, for instance – is Searle’s (1995) preferred example. Second, constructivism carries out the epistemological implications of the aforementioned. If knowledge can be considered as an ‘institutional fact’, since it relies on language, and since ‘concepts are the condition for the possibility of know ledge’ (K ant), then also k nowled ge is socia lly constructed (Kuhn 1970 [1962]). Kn owledg e is not pr e-given data passively registered by an observ er. Eskimos disting uish with many more words, hence see many more things, for what others would simply refer to as ‘white’. T his positio n asks fo r being sensitive to the effect of tr uth conventions, but does not necessarily imply than ‘anything goes’.
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LAPLACE TRANSFORM AND ITS APPLICATIONS

LAPLACE TRANSFORM AND ITS APPLICATIONS

This paper thus, consisted of a brief overview of what Laplace Transform is, and what is it used for. The primary use of Laplace Transform of converting a time domain function into its frequency domain equivalent was also discussed. Major properties of Laplace Transform and a few special functions like the Heaviside’s Unit Step Function and Dirac Delta Functions were also discussed in detail. It also included a detailed explanation of Inverse Laplace Transform and the various methods that can be employed in finding the Inverse Laplace Transform. It goes without saying that Laplace Transform is put to tremendous use in many branches of Applied Sciences.
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CARBON NANOTUBES AND ITS APPLICATIONS

CARBON NANOTUBES AND ITS APPLICATIONS

carbon, a tube-shaped material and nanometer scale used for measuring its diameters. The thickness of a nanometer is about one-billionth of a meter, or one ten-thousandth of a human hair. In the carbon nanotube graphite layer is rolled-up with continuous unbroken hexagonal mesh in the chicken wire. At the apexes of the hexagons carbon molecules are found. Diameters of the carbon nanotubes have ranging from <2 nm up to 55 nm. The lengths of carbon nanotubes are typically several microns. But in recent advancements the length of nanotubes found longer, and measured in centimeter.
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A combinatorial lemma and its applications

A combinatorial lemma and its applications

3 The combinatorial lemma and its applications The result which is common for our proofs of the existence of zeros for excess demand mappings, continuum of zeros for parameterized excess[r]

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IOT and Its Smart Applications

IOT and Its Smart Applications

The main idea of the Internet (The Internet of Things) is about two decades old and has attracted many researchers and industries, with the expectation that it will affect its major improvements daily and social life. When things like household appliances are connected to a network, they can work together in a partnership to provide the perfect service as a whole and not a collection of self-running devices. This is useful for many world services and services, and we can do it for example to build a smart home. The window can be automatically switched off when the air
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Green Technology and its Applications

Green Technology and its Applications

Within each of these categories, there are a specific number of credits available via many subcategories. LEED ratings are rapidly becoming boasting points or property owners with property values of LEED certified buildings skyrocketing. LEED has been assisted in its success by the early adoption of many government agencies. Today, however, it is mostly a market driven engine with the number of LEED registered projects growing each year.

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