Constructivist Learning Theory

Top PDF Constructivist Learning Theory:

SELF-REGULATED LEARNING IN CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH BASED SCIENCE LABORATORY PRACTICES AND OPINIONS ON CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

SELF-REGULATED LEARNING IN CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH BASED SCIENCE LABORATORY PRACTICES AND OPINIONS ON CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

problems in such laboratory classes. Students may not find the right solution and be required to search for an alternative solution. Students find solutions to problems by using their own infor- mation and concepts, and by exchanging their views with other students views until they reach a general idea in both cases. this approach is consistent with constructivist learning theory in which the learner participates in the learning process actively and he/she is responsible for his/ her own learning (schneider, Krajcik, marx & soloway, 2002; shiland, 1999; staver, 1998; treagust, 1991). according to the theory, an individual correlates information obtained as a result of his/her interaction with surrounding cases and objects with his/her former informa- tion, and then, constructs it as new information (Kelly, 1997; osborne, 1996; shiland, 1999; Treagust, 1991). Therefore, inquiry based, problem based, project based, and argumentation based laboratory activities depending on the constructivist learning model have recently been used commonly.
Show more

9 Read more

CONSTRUCTIVIST LANGUAGE LEARNING TOOL

CONSTRUCTIVIST LANGUAGE LEARNING TOOL

The major shift provided by the constructivist learning theory is advancing the student from the passive role of the receiver of information/knowledge, as presented and paced by the teacher, to the active role of constructing the knowledge through the interaction with their environment (Keene, 2014). This shifts the learning paradigm from teacher- centered to student-centered, enabling the student to construct the knowledge by actively researching, experimenting, collaborating and using their existing knowledge to build upon it in a ‘spiral’ fashion. In order to achieve this, the student must be presented with the sources of knowledge, as well as the appropriate challenges and means of collaboration with peers, while the teacher takes the role of the facilitator. Other constructivist learning elements include the testing of gained knowledge in practical situation and learning in the contextual manner. Though this set of requirements might seem elaborate, it is achievable even with generic learning solutions such as Moodle 3 (Moreno, 2007) or Blackboard 4 (Liaw, 2008). The latter study showed that the primary concern of students, prior to the quality of the multimedia learning material, is the interactivity of the system, which speaks in favor of constructivist approach. Similar to the general field of e-learning, the research in constructivist learning technology usually yields descriptive results and sets of guidelines (Koohang, 2009). However, precise, quantitative measurements do exist. In a study of adult introductory Java programming course (Alonso, 2009) the results showed that classical e-learning came out worse in overall learning outcome than the classical, face-to-face learning. However, when altered to apply constructivist principles to learning, the outcome was better than in traditional setting; still, the average effort (invested time) was significantly smaller in traditional setting, but at the price of higher cost for participants. Despite the shortage in quantitative research, constructivist approach to e-learning appears promising. The central topic of this paper is an e-learning tool developed to facilitate the constructivist learning behavior elements in students.
Show more

14 Read more

RELEVANCE OF CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH IN TEACHING & LEARNING

RELEVANCE OF CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH IN TEACHING & LEARNING

Constructivism is a set of assumptions governing the way people learn and make sense of the world. It’s founded on the premise that, by reflecting on personal experiences, people create their own understanding of the world they live in. Constructivist teaching is based on constructivist learning theory. Constructivist teaching is based on the belief that learning occurs as learners are actively involved in a process of meaning and knowledge construction as opposed to passively receiving information. Learners are the makers of meaning and knowledge. Constructivist teaching fosters critical thinking, and creates motivated and independent learners. This theoretical framework holds that learning always builds upon knowledge that a student already knows; this prior knowledge is called a schema. Because all learning is filtered through pre-existing schemata, constructivists suggest that learning is more effective when a student is actively engaged in the learning process rather than attempting to receive knowledge passively
Show more

5 Read more

Teaching Learning with Constructivist Approach

Teaching Learning with Constructivist Approach

et al., 2016).The conceptual model of relationships among constructivist learning environment perception variables like Personal Relevance, Uncertainty, Critical Voice, Shared Control, and Student Negotiation and scientific epistemological belief variables like fixed, tentative and learning approach (Kudret Ozkal et al., 2009). Effects of the Constructivist Learning Approach on the classroom management in which various aspects of classroom management such as Classroom Organization, Learning Climate, Learning Duration and its Evaluation, Using Educational Technology and Learning Environment out-of-School, Multiple Intelligence Areas, Learning by Implementation, Questioning Learning, and Student Growth are studied (Ahmet Kaya et al., 2009). The constructivist-based teaching models used in science education and 'Orff' learning stages in detail because basic principle of these models is very similar for all courses of education (Sezen Özeke 2009).It is important to know what students expect from any constructive approach like e-learning (Hasan Karal et al., 2009). In order to determine the applications of constructivist approach in science course scale was developed and found that whether constructivist approach is applied on science class (Ercan Akpınar et al., 2009). Many researchers have contributed about using ICT or e learning as tool for the Constructivist approach. Authors have investigated various cases in educational system about significance of constructivism. This research paper presents review of constructivist learning theory and there application in education to overcome from traditional teaching-learning methodologies.
Show more

5 Read more

Using Constructivist Teaching Strategies to Enhance Academic Outcomes of Students with Special Needs

Using Constructivist Teaching Strategies to Enhance Academic Outcomes of Students with Special Needs

concepts in isolation, to learn parts without seeing wholes, to make connections where they see only disparity, and to accept as reality what their perceptions question. For smart students, success in school has very little to do with true understanding, and much to do with coverage of the curriculum. In most schools, the curriculum is held as absolute, and teachers are not allowed to make changes even when students do not clearly understand important concepts. The current new Every Student Succeeds Act will make sure that teachers are not reticent to adapting the curriculum to students’ needs; the school responsibility is to view transcripts of those students who have difficulty understanding the unchanged curriculum as slow or disabled. These students can be removed from the mainstream classes, provide remedial instruction, or differentiate the instruction. In many school districts throughout the nation, students spend a good deal of time preparing for standardized tests or statewide exams. The debate that frames the current Every Student Succeeds Act will end all the helpless testing. We must set standards for our own professional practice and free students from the anti-intellectual training that occurs under the banner of test preparation. The current Every Student Succeeds Act calls on educators, school teachers and education professionals to adopt student-centered teaching strategy and successfully prepare students for their lives by understanding and honoring the dynamics of learning. In addition, education professionals must recognize that for students, schooling must be a time of curiosity, exploration, and inquiry, and memorizing information must be subordinated to learning how to find information to solve real life problems (Brooks, & Brooks, 1999[18]. Students experiencing difficulty understanding the lesson or who do not comply with directions might need the teacher to make sure directions are clear, concrete, use fewer words, increase wait time for full compliance. Teachers must physically show students directions, ask the students to repeat it by using Say See Do teaching strategy, so that the student knows what is required to do. These are different ways constructivist teachers can help all students understand and increase their full participation and mask inequities in the classroom (Koh, Chai & Tsai, 2014[14]; Sultan, Woods, & Koo, 2011 [13]; Von Glasersfeld, Watson (2001) [15]; Battenfeld & Crowford (2015[39]. http://www.truth-out.org /opinion/item/34080-every-student-Succeeds-act-still-leaves -most-vulnerable-kids-behind
Show more

7 Read more

Reflections on engagement in online learning communities

Reflections on engagement in online learning communities

It is via an online learning community that the gap between the social and the academic aspects of learning is bridged (Motteram & Forrester, 2005). Such a community is best described as a “sense rather than a tangible entity” (Wiesenfeld, 1996, as cited in Brook & Oliver, 2003, p. 42) that has an energy which ebbs and flows depending upon members’ active participation. Therefore its success in adult education depends on its attraction to students. They need to be aware of, and anticipate, the benefits of sharing their knowledge, skills and thoughts with peers and the facilitator (Motteram & Forrester, 2005).
Show more

12 Read more

Characteristics of pervasive learning environments in museum contexts

Characteristics of pervasive learning environments in museum contexts

Museums are rich repositories of information to be shared with visitors. This information can often remain partially hidden despite efforts of curators in designing cues, labels and tours. This is also the case in the Pielinen Museum, which is the second largest outdoor museum in Finland. It is renowned for its authentic atmosphere, and as such most exhibits have been left intentionally without tags, labels and information boards. The challenge of conveying the hidden stories of objects and of the past lives is tackled by an innovative pervasive learning environment (PLE), LieksaMyst, which consists of a set of learning tools including, for example, an intriguing, story-based pervasive mobile game. In the process of designing and implementing the system, we derived a set of characteristics that effective PLEs for museums should conform to. In this paper we present the background to our work, the LieksaMyst PLE, the set of characteristics, and an initial evaluation of the PLE based on the feedback from a group of learners using LieksaMyst's pervasive mobile game component.
Show more

10 Read more

LEARNING ATTAINMENTS AS A RESULT OF STUDENT ACTIVITY, COGNITION AND THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT

LEARNING ATTAINMENTS AS A RESULT OF STUDENT ACTIVITY, COGNITION AND THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT

next, the modified model was considered based on assumptions and earlier findings presented in the theoretical part of the present study. the revised model (figure 2) and the con- ceptual model (figure 1) were not contradictory in any way, but the revised model utilised the modification indices according to empirical data whenever theoretical knowledge existed for these modifications. it is possible some suggested modifications by amos program may have been overlooked, the theory basis of which might not have been realised. in any case, the data in the revised model unequivocally supported certain powerful concepts in educational psychol- ogy and the relationships between those concepts, which were identified in earlier studies. the relationship between prior achievement and current learning outcomes was the strongest ( β = 0.67). prior learning improves students’ participation in teaching ( β = 0.36) and this further enhances new learning ( β = 0.17). it seems that students’ participation as a variable does not re- flect all the activities and cognition (i.e., studying) necessary for students to learn. self-efficacy and metacognition scored high in terms of goal-oriented thinking and action. a student’s self- efficacy describes the motivational strength and his/her intention to manage studying. metacog- nitive thinking supports the students’ participation in classroom teaching and active orientation. in fact, students’ participation can augment metacognition. however, metacognition in students may also be ‘invisible.’ as a student’s self-efficacy grows, so too does his/her intention to monitor and develop his/her studies. thus, metacognitive thinking also increases. as a result, motivational and cognitive factors are essential in studying and in classroom activities.
Show more

12 Read more

Self-directed learning and apprentices: a constructivist grounded study

Self-directed learning and apprentices: a constructivist grounded study

It seems that the apprentice’s behaviour during the later phases of the apprenticeship was consistent with constructions type of decision making. This is evidenced throughout this research as the apprentices developed self-direction they were able to identify many possible solutions to problems as they presented. However, in determining the most suitable solution for a successful outcome the apprentices’ acknowledged that they would often need to settle for a second best option, as their preferred option was not palatable for various reasons within the workplace. An example was when an apprentice transferred his learning from a particular solution to a similar problem during a previous secondment with another host employer that involved the use of a newly accessible piece of equipment. This preferred and recommended approach was met with resistance within the current workplace resulting in an alternate less efficient, but tried and tested option being enacted. This problem is an example of a construction type of decision as the apprentice not only needed to identify the technical aspects of the task; he also had to navigate through the social and cultural environments surrounding the later workplace. In this instance, these environmental considerations included the current host employer feeling threatened, as the apprentice was conceptualised in his mental construct as the lesser experienced of the two. Additionally, the host employer had no knowledge of the innovative solution suggested by the apprentice regardless of the apprentice providing sound justification. He was not prepared to learn from the apprentice’s prior experiences. This apprentice demonstrated self-direction, as he was able to identify these assumptions and innately knew when and how to express his views and when to tentatively accept the views of others when making or guiding decisions.
Show more

210 Read more

Mobile learning through indigenous languages : learning through a constructivist approach

Mobile learning through indigenous languages : learning through a constructivist approach

Sharples et al. (2005) suggested that the process of learning is a process of using different skills and tools to transfer knowledge to a learner. The process in which the skills are transferred along with the tool used to transfer the knowledge will affect the understanding of the learner. Constructivism is the use of experiential and reflective learning approaches (Shih and Mills, 2007). In this theory, a learner constructs an understanding from their personal reflection of attempting a task. Therefore, learners cannot have identical reflections on the paths of attempting tasks and understanding as these processes are unique to each learner (Boghossian, 2006). A learner is also trained to build their knowledge and be able to resolve tasks even in unfamiliar circumstances (Ang et al., 2008). Through modern mobile technology, constructivism can be used through “activities in which learners actively construct new ideas or concepts based on both their previous and current knowledge” (Naismith et al., 2004:2). The constructivist theory is a philosophical theory from which modern models and theories that support the development of learning environments have emerged. The traditional constructivist approach has been used in many mobile learning initiatives to support current practices in both formal and informal learning, and these include the use of mobile software to support the construction of syllables by primary school learners (Zurita and Nussbaum, 2004) and the use of audio based learning initiatives where learners create audio material through a constructivist approach (Thornton and Houser, 2005; Evans, 2008). Theories stemming from this traditional approach such as the activity theory have also been used to support the design process of mobile learning activities (Uden, 2007). In this paper we use constructivism as a support for the current practice of learning drawing on its basic principles.
Show more

9 Read more

Non Military Cooperation Plan for ASEAN Regional Disasters

Non Military Cooperation Plan for ASEAN Regional Disasters

The concept of comprehensive security based on the theory of constructivists is trying to cooperate with various security threats coming from a new era such as natural disasters including traditional security threats [4]. In fact, it has been shifting from a short-term, accidental, and irresponsible threat such as terror- ism, natural disasters, to a comprehensive security concept against an enemy that is not seen in the long-term and conventional security threats like war. In recent years, the damage to Southeast Asian countries due to natural disasters, which cannot be an exception to the United States, has been increasing year by year, and the risk has been announced. However, In the situation where vicious circle is repeated such as increase of physical damage, and huge amount of money needed for relief, a regional cooperation system should be established as soon as possible. In the Southeast Asia region, mutual immigrants and tourists are active and active. Indirectly, the regional characteristics of the interaction of economic, economic and cultural influences of each country should be consi- dered. Now, the occurrence of natural disasters by individual countries in Southeast Asia continues to the local countries. It is a potential threat, and there are concerns about the effects of butterflies over time, space, and diversity in neighboring countries.
Show more

6 Read more

PubMedCentral-PMC4937878.pdf

PubMedCentral-PMC4937878.pdf

used for triangulation should be generalizable and consistent (see Patton 2002). However, data sources with different strengths and weaknesses can be used to challenge or integrate theories, increasing the utility of findings and the validity of conclusions (Guion, Diehl & McDonald 2011). Thirty-two clinicians were interviewed, 22 before the release of DSM-5, and 10 in the months immediately following. Clinicians and patients were both recruited using national purposive sampling. Becker & Lamb (1994) found that clinician diagnostic practices related to BPD varied by both clinical training and the sex of the provider. Accordingly, clinicians were initially recruited to fill a sampling frame of male and female providers, with different professional training (psychiatry, psychology, social work). Clinicians were subsequently recruited using snowball sampling, with no more than two additional clinicians interviewed from any one referral source a . Purposive sampling was then used to recruit clinicians who were likely to illuminate views not already well-represented in interview data. Following the recommendation of Watters & Biernacki (1989), persons diagnosed with BPD were recruited outside of clinic settings, using flyers in public places. This strategy was used primarily to increase the likelihood of candor with the interviewer, and to increase the likelihood of encountering patients beyond those enrolled in care, happy with care, or comfortable speaking with someone who appeared to be affiliated with a clinic. Given the stigma of the condition within the mental health field, outside recruitment aided all of these aims. Sampling ended when saturation was reached. This is the gold standard for qualitative data collection in developing grounded theory (Charmaz 2006). If nothing new is learned across several interviews, the sample is considered “saturated” or as informative as it is likely to become. This does not demonstrate that the data is generalizable to the
Show more

10 Read more

Cultural wellbeing in classroom communities : a constructivist grounded theory study

Cultural wellbeing in classroom communities : a constructivist grounded theory study

The underpinning objective of constructivist grounded theory is to theorise from participants’ perspectives, and Charmaz (2014, p. 17) is explicit that any theoretical rendering produced through constructivist grounded theory methods “offers an interpretive portrayal of the studied world, not an exact picture of it”. In-depth qualitative interviewing fits well with constructivist grounded theory to elicit subjective viewpoints (Charmaz, 2001) and the methodology draws upon a flexible array of methods (Charmaz, 2014). These include theoretical sampling; iterative collection and analysis cycles to pursue emerging themes; constant comparative analysis; and memo writing to generate interpretive theories (Kennedy & Lingard, 2006). The purpose of theoretical sampling is to gain data to help explicate the categories in the grounded theorising and to narrow the focus on emerging categories to form a loose frame for the research (Charmaz, 2014). Sampling decisions are based on researcher’s perceptions of who will be able to inform the emerging theorisation and a diverse array of influences may contribute to the decisions of who to interview next in the constructivist grounded theory process (Charmaz, 2014; Clarke, 2005).
Show more

269 Read more

7-21-2011 12:00 AM The role of reflection in audiology students’ development as professional practitioners: A constructivist grounded theory

7-21-2011 12:00 AM The role of reflection in audiology students’ development as professional practitioners: A constructivist grounded theory

Writing has been described as “a method of inquiry, a way of finding out about yourself and your topic” (Richardson, 1994, p. 516). Indeed, I have used this writing opportunity as a method of discovery. Reflecting on this journey to discover grounded theory methodology, I believe that all forms of grounded theory, if undertaken in a careful and thoughtful manner, are informed by the three major schools. Glaser believes that all is data, and that we can accurately represent the truth through grounded theory (Glaser & Holton, 2004). The three schools are historically tied, and an understanding of all three is likely to improve the application of just one. Corbin and Strauss (2008) believe that researchers can do their best to interpret what is truly happening. Finally, Charmaz (2006) believes that we are a part of the research process, thoroughly immersed in the process and both influencing and interpreting the data we collect, analyze, and report. I agree most strongly with Charmaz but also learned from the reading of the others, and align myself with the following view of an experienced grounded theorist: “…everything I see, hear, smell, and feel about the target, as well as what I already know from my studies and my life experience, are data. I act as interpreter of the scene I observe, and as such I make it come to life for the reader. I grow it” (Noerager Stern, 2007, p. 115). Thus, a constructivist approach to grounded theory is necessary to accommodate this view. However, before embarking on a grounded theory study, the contents of this chapter served as an informed conjecture of where I would ultimately end up on the methodological spiral.
Show more

265 Read more

63. HOW CAN AN UDERSTANDING OF LEARNING THEORIES BE USED IN THE DESIGN OF TRAINING? A CRITICAL EVALUATION

63. HOW CAN AN UDERSTANDING OF LEARNING THEORIES BE USED IN THE DESIGN OF TRAINING? A CRITICAL EVALUATION

Although problem based learning is predominately used in educational institutions, it might be applicable in an organisational training setting. e training could be designed, in a way that enables employees to work together in teams to solve a specific managerial or customer based problem. ereby, the process could be guided by an instructor, or the team training could be designed for independent learning, which might encourage the participants to increase their effort of self-directed learning. According to rosenberg (1995), the condition of working in teams can be helpful when solving a problem. moreover, Neo (2001) underlines the utilization of problem based learning in employee training, especially when applying multimedia techniques, such as audios, videos and images. A training design that emphasizes an independent problem solving rather than a guided approach, might lead to an increase in self-reliance and decisiveness in the participants (moore, 1973). ese skills, which could be acquired through a training premised on problem based learning, are requested from employees and future managers (mackay, 2006). regarding Vygotsky’s social development theory, all three aspects might be implemented in a training design. e emergence of development through social interaction might be useful, when understanding the opening stages, the breaks and the conclusion phase of a training process. e training design could contain an extensive initial phase, in which the participants have time to become familiar with each other and to socialise. is might encourage them to use the breaks and the conclusion phase to recapitulate the subject matter of the training through interaction, which could encourage cognitive learning (mcGee, 1992). An understanding of the more knowledgeable other might be useful in understanding the importance of a coach or mentor in the training design. e more knowledgeable other might not even be a human being, but a computer, which operates as guidance in computer-based training and trainings that focus on e-learning (Scardamalia, 1994). According to Allen (2006), mentoring and coaching is a significant factor of success of trainings. An understanding of the zone of proximal development might be more applicable for training evaluation, than for training design. e evaluation of the training could involve the observation of independent learning during the training process (moore, 1973).
Show more

8 Read more

From Passive to Active Learning: Experience from INES-Ruhengeri, a University of Applied Sciences in the Republic of Rwanda

From Passive to Active Learning: Experience from INES-Ruhengeri, a University of Applied Sciences in the Republic of Rwanda

Think-Pair-Share is an effective strategy to help participants frame their thoughts and prepare them for sharing. In its simplest form, learners think about a particular question or prompt and then pair up to discuss their ideas. The next stage is to share their results with a larger group, which might be another pair of learners or the whole large group. Think-pair- sharing forces all learners to attempt an initial response to the prompt, which they can then clarify and expand as they collaborate. This process should take five to ten minutes, depending on the question’s complexity (Sampsel, 2013). Some lecturers indicated that the class size of students (15%) and workload (23%) can affect the ability to use ALS. The strategies of engaging and supporting all students are based on a model of learning that refines the popular notion of ‘scaffolding’. The idea of scaffolding is that a teacher or lecturer provides support for a learner to ‘build’ skills, and then removes the support as skills develop, and the learner becomes independent (David, 2016).
Show more

6 Read more

Rapprochement between Piagetian and Vygotskian Theories: Application to Instruction

Rapprochement between Piagetian and Vygotskian Theories: Application to Instruction

This concept paper was intended to establish rapprochement between Piaget and Vygotsky by comparing their developmental theories and also examining how their educational extensions can be applied in promoting students’ learning in Basic Education Programme in Ghana. Piaget’s proposition that cognitive development from infant to young adult occurs in four universal and consecutive stages are presented. Aspects of Piaget’s theory emphasized by educators are also presented and educational practices inspired by this theory are outlined. Vygotsky’s belief that socio – cultural environment is critical for cognitive development is presented, and his two concepts of cognitive learning zones - The Zone of Actual Development (ZAD) and the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) are also noted. Finally, the two theories are compared and their applications in education delivery are examined. Even though Piaget and Vygotsky hold different views concerning developmental psychology, it is recommended that the use of both theories in classrooms is beneficial. Teachers should have a solid understanding of Piaget’s and Vygotsky’s theories, and students should be provided with more opportunities to play and learn with peers.
Show more

6 Read more

Examination of relationship between preservice chemistry teachers' preferences for creating constructivist learning environment and sense of efficacy

Examination of relationship between preservice chemistry teachers' preferences for creating constructivist learning environment and sense of efficacy

Teacher sense of efficacy is an important component to develop teachers’ efficaciousness in educational environments [1]. This concept is related to their belief in how students learn well and how they can influence their students in a learning environment [2]. Teachers with high self-efficacy tend to create better student outcomes because these teachers are more insistent in helping students with difficulties [3, 4]. Teacher sense of efficacy is effective for teachers to create a supportive learning environment, to teach a subject and to provide discipline in the classroom [5]. As to attaining the educational objectives depends on the quality of classroom-learning environment [6]. In order to improve the quality of the classroom-learning environment, it was emphasized to prepare a learning environment in parallel with constructivist learning approach along with the reforms in our country [7]. The success of a programme based on constructivism is directly associated with the knowledge, skills, experience and beliefs of teachers who are expected to implement this programme [8]. In such an environment, which involves constructivist teaching, teachers invite students to be involved in decisions about their learning. Interactions between students and teachers are emphasized in a constructivist classroom. With the development of constructivism,
Show more

5 Read more

Volume 3, Issue 4, April 2014 Page 123

Volume 3, Issue 4, April 2014 Page 123

ICT not only helps to avail the in depth knowledge of basic courses but also increases the flexibility of delivery of education so that learners can access knowledge anytime and from anywhere. ICT can influence the way students are taught and how they learn as now the processes are learner driven and not by teachers. Teachers will play an effective role in the overall use of ICT whose main task will not be to transmit information and culture but rather act as expert to motivate learning. This paper explores the various factors affecting the use of computers in school. ICT encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning and offers problem centered and inquiry based learning which provides easy access and information based resources. Especially in developing countries like India, effective use of ICT leads to development of the educational sector resulting in educational competitiveness and increased employment. This paper explores the different impacts ICT has on teaching and learning including the impact on pupils and learners. Education is the driving force of economic and social development in any country [2]. Considering this, it is necessary to find ways to make education of good quality, accessible and affordable to all, using the latest technology available. ICT has the potential to remove the barriers that are causing the problems of low rate of education in any country .It can be used as a tool that helps to overcome the issues of cost, less number of teachers, and poor quality of education as well as to overcome time and distance barriers which are the major hurdles in the field of development.
Show more

6 Read more

Leading the academic library in strategic engagement with stakeholders: a constructivist grounded theory

Leading the academic library in strategic engagement with stakeholders: a constructivist grounded theory

Two main factors hampered the research process. First, while researching possible participants, many were ineligible due to their short time of incumbency in the position. This was particularly the case in the regional university sector, where it was difficult to find participants who met the criteria or were willing to take part in the research. A second regional participant (D12) was secured only during the theoretical sampling stage. To overcome any perception of lack of credibility for the data from regional university libraries, D12 was also interviewed in the final interview stage to check that the theory resonated. The second limitation is that the research does not examine the experiences and perceptions of other library staff members, and it does not explore the impact of the library on research or student outcomes. Further research is suggested to test the effect of the library upon its various stakeholders and the regional university library context.
Show more

21 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...