continuing professional learning and development

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An evaluation of the introduction of blended learning to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

An evaluation of the introduction of blended learning to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Curriculum development – the ‘hub and spoke’ model – the pathways Although this report focuses on the blended learning aspect of the development, it is important to note that this was in fact a multi-faceted change. Some of the people we spoke to felt it would have been easier to only focus on the blended learning aspect. The changes in modules meant that everything had to be processed through UWE’s modular procedures, taking time and creating delays. We have heard how admissions staff had to deal with students’ queries when there was no concrete information on the modules and nothing for students to enrol on. The wider changes also provoked issues of identity for staff with strong senses of ownership of material. It had been decided that the development would be supported by a project infrastructure with a steering group, adequate funding for the work to be done, and administrative support. The first stage of the project was built around two areas of learning: emergency and critical care and managing long term conditions. A member of the academic staff from each of these areas was identified as a Pathway Leader to lead staff through the development. The Learning Technology Development Unit (LTDU) was brought in to provide support for developing on-line learning.
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Continuing professional development: learning that leads to change in individual and collective clinical practice

Continuing professional development: learning that leads to change in individual and collective clinical practice

Professional bodies have recognised that mere attendance of CPD events and recording of inputs are no guarantee of learning or improvements in professional practice (IAESB 2008, Davis and others 1999). This has led to an exploration of frameworks for CPD more focused on outcomes (Moore and others 2009, Van Hoof and Meehan 2011), such as behavioural changes, that lead to client benefits. However, it is important that new methods, like the old, are evaluated to ensure that they are achieving their desired goals (Olson and Tooman 2012, Schostak and others 2010). This study has confirmed that Kirkpatrick’s (1998) framework provides a useful tool for evaluating the effectiveness of any learning experience beyond basic levels of enjoyment (Olson and Tooman 2012, Leung and others 2010). One CertAVP participant chose to use this framework explicitly to structure their summary, but it was clear, as common themes emerged from this summary set, that all participants attached importance and value to changes in their practice that had led to benefits to the practice team, their patients and their owners.
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Continuing professional development for teachers in Thailand

Continuing professional development for teachers in Thailand

indicate that participants make significant changes in their beliefs and practice as a result of attending the training opportunities. Their findings suggest that having adequate time, and the opportunities for active learning, reflection, and collaboration were important for changes in thinking and professional practice. Furthermore, Taitelbaum, Mamlok-Naaman, Carmeli & Hofstein (2008) studied the development of fourteen chemistry teachers who were involved in a CPD program, focusing on using the inquiry approach in the chemistry classroom-laboratory. The sources of information used as evidence for teachers’ changes were teachers’ reflections and teachers’ practice, obtained from interviews, teachers’ portfolios, documentation of the workshop, and observation. The findings suggested that the CPD program contributed to the professional development of the teachers. The teachers had gained more self-confidence, had become more reflective and more aware of their practice, and had changed their teaching practice. The change in the method used in grouping the students, the change in managing the laboratories’ lessons, (from teacher-centered to student-centered), and the change in phrasing and posing an inquiry question, are provided as examples of the teachers’ changes.
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Developing a flexible approach to Initial Teacher Training and Continuing Professional Development for the Adult and Community Learning sector: a case for collaboration

Developing a flexible approach to Initial Teacher Training and Continuing Professional Development for the Adult and Community Learning sector: a case for collaboration

The main recommendation from the second year of the project, building on the already successful approach to collaboration across the organisations, is to establish a framework for collaboration across ITT and CPD. The aim is to enhance collaborative working and embed flexibility into the offer for all staff. Whilst the development of the framework is ongoing, it will include such things as an agreed definition of roles for associate and full teaching role across all SDIs, and coordinated training programme for ITT including the development and piloting blended learning modules. As a starting point for development, the potential for a central professional development unit for the four SDIs will be explored. This is likely to include a central planning group to agree priorities for collaborative CPD programme, with membership to include staff development managers (or those with responsibility for staff development planning) and teacher trainers.
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Mobile learning for informal learning and continuing professional development in Australian healthcare environments : the status of nursing

Mobile learning for informal learning and continuing professional development in Australian healthcare environments : the status of nursing

researched, there continues to be a lack of acknowledgement of the complexity of the implementation of new work practices (Fixsen et al. 2005). While nurses in two Australian states cannot legitimately seek and retrieve information in real-time, the advancement of nursing practice will be hindered. Empowerment of nurses to become proficient and effective in the use of digital technologies is necessary to enable organisations that do allow mobile learning to flourish Using mobile technology for learning and teaching in healthcare environments in two Australian states continues to be a missed opportunity to transform nursing practice. There needs to be parallel development of social etiquette or ‘netiquette’ modelled at an individual level to promote professional conduct and structural empowerment within organisations that enable harnessing of the potential of developing learning organisations as expressed by Senge (1990).. The overarching rationale for ensuring healthcare professionals are conversant with social media, mobile technologies and mobile learning is to enable safe, effective and high quality care to patients and clients with the aim or improving health outcomes. Australian research explored the needs of nurse supervisors (Mather, Marlow & Cummings 2013) and use of digital technology for learning and teaching by student nurses (Mather, Cummings & Allen 2013) and was the impetus for exploring the use of mobile learning in healthcare environments. The findings of these different projects suggested that healthcare workers were being denied access to digital technology that could advance learning and teaching, nursing practice and improve patient outcomes. These previous studies also found that although mobile technology is ubiquitous in the environment, healthcare professionals, especially nurses are disadvantaged because outdated policies and guidelines precluded its use within healthcare settings. Access to mobile technology
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Issues in continuing professional development : towards a systematic framework

Issues in continuing professional development : towards a systematic framework

Silver summarises this task as breeding a new profes- sionalism. Some of the key features of professionalism are formal initial training, a requirement to continue to develop, and an ethical code, which determines ever yday practice. The building blocks for the creation of these requirements are beginning to be put in place. FENTO has produced standards for teaching and suppor ting learning, and standards for managers are currently under preparation. The DfEE is working on proposals for an initial teacher training requirement and for a qualification for principals. There have been broad discussions within the sector about the value of a professional body for FE staff. All of this ser ves
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Attitude And Barriers Towards Participation In Continuing Professional Development Programme Among Nurses

Attitude And Barriers Towards Participation In Continuing Professional Development Programme Among Nurses

Nurses, by virtue of their licensure status, have a fiduciary duty to continually improve their professional aintaining and improving levels of competency and patient safety require nurses in clinical settings to constantly acquire new professional and interpersonal skills, keep abreast of evolving evidence-based practices, and become experts using new technology (Beatty, Various studies reveal that nurses take part in continuing professional development for many reasons including promotion of professional knowledge and clinical skills, providing better care services for patients, up-dating n, fulfilling organizational commitments, and obtaining educational certificates (Taylor et al., 1999). Many nurses continue to seek knowledge by obtaining higher degrees, participating in professional organizations, attending conferences, or reading nursing journals. Others depend on their employer or accredited online entities to provide education programs. Regardless of the means, continued learning is imperative to the practice of INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CURRENT RESEARCH
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Report of the Project Maths Implementation Support Group

Report of the Project Maths Implementation Support Group

The single most important element in improving mathematics learning is the quality of mathematics teachers. Teachers must have sufficient mathematical knowledge to develop and support good mathematics teaching for every pupil. Investment in continuing professional development of teachers is central to this enterprise. A particular need has been identified to provide intensive post graduate courses on a regionally accessible in-service basis for the estimated 2,000 teachers who do not currently hold a qualification in mathematics. Funds have been provided in 2010 to begin this process. Further funding of an estimated €21m will be required over the period to end 2013. The Group recommends that the Department of Education and Skills should work towards the achievement by 2018 of an objective that all students in second level schools are taught mathematics at all levels solely by teachers who hold a qualification in mathematics. Post graduate courses for existing teachers should be provided on a scale and level commensurate with this objective and this investment should be continued to 2018.
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Modelling Continuing Professional Development in an Innovative Context

Modelling Continuing Professional Development in an Innovative Context

In terms of the educational methods, project- organised studies can be recommended as they optimise close cooperation between the univer- sity and the participating organisation. With project-organised learning, the students often begin the course by presenting an actual pro- blem scenario from their own organisation. By utilising an actual problem scenario, opportuni- ties for both better communication and coope- ration between the organisation and the univer- sity are provided while, at the same time, better likelihood of successful application of the learn- ing in the workplace is ensured. Consideration should be given to both immediate and future needs as the organisation formulates its goals. Conversely, the organisation should be aware that there might be elements of the coursework that may not be immediately relevant but will become useful in the future.
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Peer observation : a tool for continuing professional development

Peer observation : a tool for continuing professional development

deepen academic learning and develop skills applicable to prac- tice. The organization of some student placements should facili- tate the possibility for peer obser- vation and learning. In a review of 2:1 clinical placement models used in physiotherapy and occupational therapy practice education (Baldry Currens, 2003), where two stu- dents were placed with 1 clinical educator, students’ appreciation of collaborative learning oppor- tunities was felt to be the most consistent fi nding. However, peer observation within the 2:1 model has been reported as occurring spontaneously and less frequently as a facilitated, planned activity (Baldry et al, 2003).
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Effects of continuing professional development on clinical performance

Effects of continuing professional development on clinical performance

Inspection Committee of the Collège des médecins du Québec (CMQ). In order to evaluate the link between CPD activities and quality of medical practice, 3 CPD groups were created. The first group was composed of physicians who were CFPC members who had participated for a 5-year period in the CPD program of the CFPC. All physicians who had received PIVs and who were members of the CFPC were included in the study. The 2 other groups were random samples of physicians paired according to the professional inspection program that had led to their PIVs. The second group was composed of physicians who were not members of the CFPC but who had declared a minimum of 50 CPD hours per year in the 5 years preceding their PIVs on their CMQ annual notice of assessment. This CPD could have consisted of participation in formal group activities (eg, symposia, courses, conferences, lectures, workshops) approved and accredited by the CFPC or by other Quebec accredited CPD organizations (Fédération des médecins omnipraticiens du Québec, Fédération des médecins spécialistes du Québec, Médecins francophones du Canada, Quebec medical schools, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada) or informal individual or group activities (eg, reading, video learning, Internet learning). The third group included physicians who were not CFPC members and who had declared little (less than 10 hours annually) or no CPD activity for at least 1 year during the 5-year period preceding their PIVs.
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An investigation into a programme of enquiry based continuing professional development for professional development leaders

An investigation into a programme of enquiry based continuing professional development for professional development leaders

While this model is not in itself evaluative, it suggests three possibilities for the collection of data with which to carry out an evaluation. First, CPD programmes can be categorised based on their intended impacts in each domain of change (van Driel et al. 2012). Next, the model allows for a sophisticated analysis of CPD through the identification of change sequences followed by participants (Clarke and Hollingsworth 2002). Through this analysis, it may be possible to identify facilitators and blockers to particular pathways of change. Finally, data can be gathered from CPD participants on their learning, which is classified against each of the four domains in order to analyse where exactly a programme’s impacts were felt. This is the process was used to evaluate Expert Episodes.
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How to be a good professional: existentialist continuing professional development (CPD)

How to be a good professional: existentialist continuing professional development (CPD)

The issue of professional identity covers both how a profession sees itself and how an individual sees him or herself in a particular professional role. Closely aligned to this notion of owning and/or inhabiting a professional role is procedural knowledge or knowing how to be (referred to above). CPD picks up where initial professional training leaves off, and Eraut (2008) argues cogently that it is in mid career that CPD takes place. He identifies learning opportunities inherent in meeting challenges at work, which occurs naturally and inevitably by simply doing things at work, or by seeking out learning opportunities. He sees confidence and mastery as key in enabling mid-career learning, and the sense of feeling supported as critical (Eraut, 2008). But mid career can also lead to stasis, and with it to professionals asking themselves profound questions around their professional direction and identity; profound enough to shade into mid-career crisis. Cooper’s research on social workers and their approach to CPD led him to ask his readers whether professional practice is ‘a minimum-requirements activity’ or an ‘opportunity for life-long learning, challenge and growth’ (Cooper, 2010, p. 180). He articulates some of the metaphors these social workers used to describe their situation. These included descriptions such as ‘trapped’, ‘stuck’ and ‘bogged down’, all indicative of a sense of stagnation. Some of the social workers wondered how they had got into this profession and expressed uncertainty as to where they were going. Social work, as a sector and as a profession, has of course been under intense scrutiny in the past decade and these responses, while somewhat shocking at first view, may not be surprising given that context. There is a resonance here with existentialist counselling, which focuses on helping people in coming to terms with life in all its confusing complexity (Van Deurzen, 2000).
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Continuing individual and workforce professional development   The Bristol and West of England Consortium for Continuing Professional Development in Aerospace (CPDA)

Continuing individual and workforce professional development The Bristol and West of England Consortium for Continuing Professional Development in Aerospace (CPDA)

A mixture of the above learning processes has been tried by the CPDA recently and has worked very well to date. Contact time was shortened, but the opportunity was retained, as it is recognised that it is vitally important for networking and general understanding. Extended e-learning, in the form of on-line activities - some with diagnostic tests to aid learning, was added before the assessment could be undertaken. So far, this has been tried on two CPDA modules. David Wornham, of the Bristol Business School at the University of the West of England, was one of those who tried out this blended learning approach on his long-standing Aerospace Strategic Management module. He notes that:
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Teachers' perceptions of continuing professional development

Teachers' perceptions of continuing professional development

There have been a number of survey style research studies relating to teachers’ perceptions of CPD over the last few years. The TTA (1995) commissioned MORI to undertake a comprehensive review of CPD activities. The findings sustained the view that CPD was still of an ad hoc nature with inconsistencies in terms of expenditure, usage of the five closure days for CPD activities and little or no means of evaluation. Primary sector teachers maintained that CPD was based on teaching and learning while Secondary teachers saw the focus mainly concerned with issues relating to Key Stage Three. Overall, teachers considered the main focus of their CPD activity to have been management (22% of respondents), SEN (19%) and English (17%). Provision was usually by LEAs (48%), followed by schools themselves (40%). Only 10% were provided by Higher Education Institutions and 8% by private consultancies. Few courses were accredited reinforcing, from the teachers view, the need for this to be addressed. Teachers were also asked what other activities, not identified in the questionnaire, have helped in their CPD. Responses included: discussions with other staff – either within their own schools or other institutions; work for professional associations or as external examiners; internal school processes such as working groups within a relevant curriculum area; and reading publications/relevant material.
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CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

Knowledge is exploding and new technology is emerging so fast putting challenges before the teachers and learners. As India strives to achieve universal primary enrolment (MDG2) and implements the Right to Free and Compulsory Education Act (2009), well-qualified and effective teachers remain at the heart of school reform. The need for adequate preparation and professional development of teachers has been recognized the world over with the realization that the teacher’ conceptions and attitudes play an important role in the teaching learning process. Professional institutions are struggling to find ways of evaluating professional development. This article has two principal objectives. The first is to highlight the skills required for successful, lifelong professional development. The second objective is to suggest strategies and methodologies that can assist in the acquisition of professional development skills. Here, professional development is considered not a product or an outcome - it is a process.
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Continuing professional development for teachers

Continuing professional development for teachers

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education to gain a recognised teaching qualification. These programmes provide us with knowledge and skills to support our role as a teacher. The programmes explore how our students might learn, the pedagogic approaches we can use to engage them, tools that we can use to assess them, services and approaches to supporting a diverse range of students, how to design effective programmes and many other areas that will enable us to meet the requirements of our role. The programmes can be delivered face to face, online or through a blended approach which is common today. There have been some
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Adult Learning for Continuing Professional Development among Dental Practitioners

Adult Learning for Continuing Professional Development among Dental Practitioners

The Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of the Dental Practitioners after formal training in dental colleges has transformed notably in past few years. Traditional methods like lectures, books and journals are added by the newer methods like online courses, Case based learning through social media. These changing educational methods are linked to clinical practice very closely. The knowledge of the Adult Learning or Andragogy is essential in planning the Professional Development programs for the practitioners. Adult learners are goal oriented, learning oriented and responsible for their own learning. This review attempts to throw some light on various aspects of Adult learning and its significance in Continuing Professional Development for Dental Practitioners.
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Professional development programmes for teachers moving from majority to minoritised language medium education : lessons from a comparative study

Professional development programmes for teachers moving from majority to minoritised language medium education : lessons from a comparative study

Arguments promoting MLM education for children who are not (yet) fluent speakers can be seen as antithetical to those put forward for MLM education for those who are fluent. If education through one’s ‘first’ language is a key factor in academic success, what then is the rationale for educating children who speak the ‘dominant’ language at home through the medium of the language they do not (initially) know? In this case, proponents point to the success of provision derived originally from the Canadian French immersion programmes (Lambert and Tucker 1972) and more recently from Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) programmes which have been designed to enable school students to learn foreign languages (particularly English in countries where this is not the national language) to a high level of competence (Coyle et al. 2010; but see also Bruton 2011 and Cenoz et al. 2013, for critiques of the conceptualisation and outcomes of CLIL). Critically, pupils in such programmes are regarded not as ‘submerged’ but as ‘immersed’ in the language, and the outcome as ‘additive’ rather than ‘subtractive’ bilingualism. As they involve pupils developing oracy and literacy in both their
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Reflection and our professional lives

Reflection and our professional lives

Like medicine, our profession is science based, and it is our evidence-based approach to diagnosis and treatment of animal problems that is the basis of the social contract that underpins the monopoly on “acts of veterinary surgery” that is our professional privilege (May 2013). The scientific method is one of the most powerful methods that we have for exploring the “truth” about our material world, but its strength also gives rise to its limitations. As far as possible, when we engage in the critical analysis essential to science, we place ourselves on the outside of phenomena under investigation to establish our objectivity as observers. In order not to compromise our methods, we also maintain our protocols throughout to avoid the introduction of any researcher bias. However, if we start to apply scientific method broadly to all the challenges that we face, the danger is that we miss the crucial role we play in our actions and fail to recognise the way our limitations and biases affect the outcomes of these.
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