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Sheltering under the Covenant: The National Covenant, Orthodoxy and the Irish Rebellion, 1638-1642

Sheltering under the Covenant: The National Covenant, Orthodoxy and the Irish Rebellion, 1638-1642

The Covenanter leadership's concerns over the condition of Ireland urged further action but leading churchmen were uncertain over how far they could intervene. Following the outbreak of rebellion, the ministry of northern parts of Ireland was itinerant at best and, at its worst, depleted of the necessary manpower to function. In August 1642, communities in the north of Ireland presented the first of what would become a litany of petitions to the General Assembly asking for help as 'the sword of the Rebels, hath bereft us of our friends, and spoiled us of our goods, and left us but a few, and that a poor handfull of many, and hath chased from us the rest that were called our Ministers'. The petitioners were quick to point out that a great many of their ministers had fled to Scotland prior to the Rebellion 'who being chased into Scotland, were not altogether un-usefull in the day of your need', identifying the important role migrating ministers played in the formation of the National Covenant. The petition asked that 'these so unjustly reft from us' should be send back en masse or declared 'transportable' from their congregations in Scotland to transfer back to Ireland. The petitioners claimed that this was not only through 'necessity, but equity'. These ministers still held positions in Ireland: they had a moral and legal obligation to return. 70 In response, the General Assembly were 'loathe to usurpe without their own bounds, or stretch themselves beyond their own measure' and appointed a delegation of ministers to go to the northern counties of Ireland for four months at a time. 71 Ministers undergoing their clerical trials, known as 'expectants', were also encouraged to look to Ireland for preaching opportunities. 72 In all of the petitions that followed, the General Assembly's response always stopped short at offering permanent ministerial candidates citing their own dwindling stock of orthodox clerics.
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The Old Testament and the New Covenant

The Old Testament and the New Covenant

I) Cf. the famous, often quoted tines (I, pp. 15f.): ..Jeder Triumphzug. welcher durch die Strassen Roms ging, war eine W eissagung auf den C aesar Augustus denn w as dieser immerzu war, das steilte der Trium phator an seinem Ehrentage v o r: den G ctt im Menschen, Jupiter im römischen Biirger. Darin dass Rom seinen Siegem diese Ehrenbezeugung zuerkannte, gab sich seine Zukunft zu erkennen, dass es die W e lt durch den göttlich verehrten Imperator beherrschen würde " — This is compared to the Passover Lamb as type of the Christ. Cf. the criticism by BuLTMANN in Sfudta T/ieo/opt'ca II, I f1949', pp. 27ff., where B. attempts to find the truth in the ideas of HOFMANN. BuLTMANN examines the notions of the Covenant, the Kingdom of God, and of the People of God, and describes, on this examination, Old Testam ent H istory as Prophecy, fulfilled in the New Testam ent. T h e Fulfilment is expressed in the failure, the inner contradiction in the realization of the three notions in the history of Israel and Judaism. C f. also the appreciation of HOFMANN given by F . B u H L in his for his time, and in its introductory chapters stilt important D e messiansAre f*or/ae(fe/ser ; def Gam/e !Tesfamenf (1894), pp. 15f. — O f important literature besides the just mentioned works I only refer to ElCHRODT s Chapters in his TAeo/og:e des .A/fen Tesfam enfi.
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Marriage and family in view of the doctrine of the covenant

Marriage and family in view of the doctrine of the covenant

Thus far, the overview of the Protestant description of marriage is as a covenant. The doctrine of the covenant enriches, to my mind, the idea of marriage and provides a good foundation for the presentation of marriage in today’s secularising communities and for the care of marriage and family life in church ministry today. However, in spite of the great value of the view of the covenantal character of marriage in Protestant traditions, marriage as such has in the past and can presently and in future develop into an androcentric and patriarchal institution in which wives are regarded as subordinate to their husbands. This argument is raised by Dreyer and Van Aarde (2007:631) as an objection to the covenant metaphor. They indicate that the scriptural material usually used to defend the model of marriage, as a covenant founded in relation between God and humans, indicates an unequal relation between husband and wife, for the relation between God and humans is unequal. Marriage as a covenant is, in their view, prone to be a patriarchal marriage. This observation of Dreyer and Van Aarde is important and the question can be asked: Should the covenantal model of marriage be abolished? In my view, the model as developed in Protestant traditions can be redefined and presented in such a way that the unacceptable patriarchalism attached to it can be avoided and the precious contents of the model can be maintained and applied in Christian marital ethics and ministry of the church. The following concluding section is an attempt to propose modifications to the traditional covenantal model of marriage to maintain its abundance and depth for ministry today.
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Inherent defects and the repair covenant in commercial leases

Inherent defects and the repair covenant in commercial leases

Forbes J cites this statement as authority for the proposition that there is no doctrine that inherent defects do not fall within the covenant to repair. Even if the case concerns an inherent defect, the question remains whether the work required involves giving the landlord something different in kind from what was demised (that is, whether the work is renewal or repair), and that question is a matter of degree in each case. But Lysnkey J may have erred by taking this view on the authority of Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe v McOscar, 65 because that case did not concern an inherent defect at all; it concerned the standard of repair required under a repair covenant. The issue in that case was whether the tenants were liable to execute such repairs (taking account of the age, character, and locality of the premises) as would make the premises reasonably fit to satisfy the requirements of reasonably minded tenants of the class that would then be likely to occupy them, or whether, on the contrary, the tenants were liable for the costs of all acts necessary well and sufficiently to repair the premises so as to put them in that state of repair which they would be in were they managed by a reasonably minded owner. It was found that the latter was the requisite standard. 66 No issue concerning inherent defects was raised, or discussed, in the case. It is instructive to note that Anstruther’s case is the only case cited by Lynskey J to support his judgement. Given that he relies exclusively on the one case, and that the case relied on is off point, Southeby’s authority for the issues determined in Ravenseft must be considered questionable. It is noteworthy that Forbes J himself might be seen to acknowledge a difficulty with the judgement, when he comments that Lynskey J’s judgement: ‘is clearly to reject, or overlook, any
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More Kuyperania

More Kuyperania

Why start with the Noahic covenant? Kuyper places much emphasis on the inclusive nature of the Noahic covenant and that it was not a redemptive covenant. The flood changed the state o[r]

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The cost of private debt covenant violation

The cost of private debt covenant violation

ITAX is calculated as for firms without debt covenants and for firms with debt covenants. DACC is discretionary accruals for the quarter estimated as the residual from the regression shown in Eq. (2). and are estimated in Table 4, Model 2, and represent the rate of book- tax conformity. is the firm’s marginal tax rate for the year obtained from John Graham (Graham, 1996). SLACK is calculated as the covenant threshold as reported in Dealscan less the actual value from Compustat scaled by the standard deviation of the actual value over the past eight quarters. These values are then ranked into deciles for each covenant. The value of SLACK used is the firm’s minimum SLACK decile for each quarter. NEG is an indicator equal to one if the firm’s annual earnings are negative, zero otherwise. NOL is an indicator equal to one if the firm has a net operating loss carryforward balance, zero otherwise. PP&E is the ratio of property plant and equipment to total assets. INTANG is the ratio of intangible assets divided by total assets. Missing values of INTANG are assigned a value of zero. SIZE is the log of total assets. FOPS is equal to one if the firm reports non-zero foreign pre-tax income. MB is the market to book ratio, measured as the firm’s market value of equity at the fiscal quarter end divided by the firm’s total book equity at the fiscal quarter end. INTEREST EXPENSE is quarterly interest expense divided by beginning total assets. Some values of INTEREST EXPENSE are coded as combined or insignificant in the Compustat database. Thus for INTEREST EXPENSE only, N=14,996 in Panel A and 35,673 in Panel B. TOTAL DEBT is long term debt plus long term debt in current liabilities all divided by beginning total assets.
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Chapter 3: Property and Conveyancing

Chapter 3: Property and Conveyancing

In concluding that there was no such implied covenant, the Court relied upon the fact that there was an apparently substantial minimum rent provided for and an absence [r]

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The South Yorkshire Armed Forces Covenant model

The South Yorkshire Armed Forces Covenant model

I n 2017 a regional partnership, consisting of Sheffield City Council, Rotherham, Doncaster and Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Councils, Sheffield Hallam University and York St John University, successfully bid for an Armed Forces Covenant Fund grant designed to strengthen the local government delivery of the Covenant. The two yearlong South Yorkshire Armed Forces Covenant project activities were designed to:

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The South Yorkshire Armed Forces Covenant model

The South Yorkshire Armed Forces Covenant model

In terms of Action plan content consistency, each of the four area plans cover similar ground and are compatible. Each area plan has content actions that involve aspirations of: alignment with all area strategies to include the needs of the Armed Forces community; communications and marketing strategies; the development of work areas to engage local employers and schools; and reviewing, extending or raising awareness processes around housing allocations. The Action plans are constant and adhere to the same principles, which once embedded into mainstream Covenant provision will result in members of the Armed Forces community receiving a similar offer wherever they live in South Yorkshire.
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Promoting Human Rights in Classrooms: A Pre Service Teachers’ Perspective at the Bahrain Teachers College

Promoting Human Rights in Classrooms: A Pre Service Teachers’ Perspective at the Bahrain Teachers College

The Human Rights principles of universality, interdependency, accountability, transparency and participation encourage educators to view Human Rights in a holistic manner. In other words, Human Rights should not only be viewed as a pure legal matter, ignoring the economic, social and cultural aspects. The legal provision of Human Rights is very important but looking at Human Rights from multiple dimensions provides a comprehensive understanding. The holistic approach of human rights is supported by the International Covenant on Civil, Cultural and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR). In its preamble, the ICESCR states that: “in accordance with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the ideal of free human beings enjoying freedom from fear and want can only be achieved if conditions are created whereby everyone may enjoy his economic, social and cultural rights, as well as civil and political rights.” Human Rights Education has been also handled in a holistic approach as presented clearly in Article 26 (2) of the UDHR "Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality…" and in the CRC article 29 (Aims of Education) as presented in the glossary of the UNICEF official website: States Parties agree that the basic aims of the education of children are the development of the child's personality, talents, mental and physical abilities to their fullest potential and the preparation of the child for a responsible life. Education should also be directed to the development of respect for the child's parents, his or her own cultural identity, language and values and for the national values of the country in which the child is living and of the country from which the child may originate, and to the development of respect for different civilizations and the natural environment.
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Prosperity Gospel and Its Religious Impact on Sustainable Economic Development of African Nations

Prosperity Gospel and Its Religious Impact on Sustainable Economic Development of African Nations

1) Fierce proponents: with the view that the will of God for all Christians is to flou- rish in all areas of life. According to this group, prosperity preaching means having a holistic approach to man’s needs including his material wellbeing. A reference to this is deduced from David Oyedepo’s book [5] that argues that “possessing your possession” is part of God’s covenant and believers ought to prosper. Oyedepo claims that this co- venant is sealed by the death of Christ, that all who believe in the message of the gospel will along with the salvation of their souls obtain all good things in this world including wealth, health and total success.
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Counsel and covenant : aristocratic conciliarism and the Scottish revolution

Counsel and covenant : aristocratic conciliarism and the Scottish revolution

Whereas Hume characterises the nobility as ‘the Props of the Prince’s standing’, Drummond describes them as ‘like the Ivy’ that ‘began to sap the Wall by which they had been supported’.3[r]

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Recognition of an Implied Covenant of Habitability in Residential Leaseholds: Kamarath v  Bennett

Recognition of an Implied Covenant of Habitability in Residential Leaseholds: Kamarath v Bennett

Recognition of an Implied Covenant of Habitability in Residential Leaseholds Kamarath v Bennett SMU Law Review Volume 32 | Issue 4 Article 6 1978 Recognition of an Implied Covenant of Habitability in[.]

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Analysis of the Impact of Tourism on the West Africa Economy: A Panel Data Approach

Analysis of the Impact of Tourism on the West Africa Economy: A Panel Data Approach

Analysis of the Impact of Tourism on the West Africa Economy: A Panel Data Approach Ige, Cyril Segun and Odularu, Gbadebo Olusegun Covenant University, Covenant University... TOURISMOS: [r]

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From Abraham to Jacob: Promise and Fulfillment

From Abraham to Jacob: Promise and Fulfillment

Because Esau was the elder, he was the heir to Isaac and the covenant; however Jacob in his craftiness bargained with Esau for the birthright in exchange for sustenance (Gen. 25:19-34). In another cunning act Jacob was able to fool his father into blessing him as his heir. Jacob disguised himself as Esau to dupe his father, who knew Esau was the first born. Isaac was elderly and Jacob was deceptive and covered himself in animal skins to simulate the hair that Esau had on his arms. Isaac was deceived and granted a blessing on Jacob, “Let peoples serve you, and nations pay you homage; be master of you brothers, and may your mother’s sons bow down to you. Cursed be those who curse you and blessed be those who bless you” (Gen. 27:29-30).
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Dialogue Between Christians, Jews and Muslims: The Concept of Covenant as Basis

Dialogue Between Christians, Jews and Muslims: The Concept of Covenant as Basis

The difficulty of assessing the significantly different records and interpretation of the circumstances of the imposition of the Abrahamic Covenant and the offering of one of Abraham’s sons as a sacrifice is compounded by the way in which the Hebrew Biblical record has been transmitted and edited with the integration of the various sources. Using the source identification of Marks, a series of passages describing 34 significant incidents have been analysed. These relate to matters from the initial command to Abraham to leave home and go to a land he would be shown, to God’s final appearance to Jacob at Beersheba in which the instruction to take his family to Egypt in what proved to be the circumstances foreshadowed to Abraham prior to Isaac’s birth. Within those passages there are 56 segments that are identifiable and six that are listed as ‘not known’. The segments are from: J, 28; E, 14; P, 8; unknown, 6; D, nil, indicating that no further editing of those critical passages was considered necessary by the D editor(s). The passage of seven verses relating to the birth, naming and circumcision of Isaac, Gen. 21:1-07, is especially complex in its construction, being successively, J,P,J,P,P,E,J. The critical naming and circumcision verses are P, and glaring errors and inconsistencies are apparent. Perhaps the most critical is the fact that the reference to the naming of the son to be sacrificed is accepted as E source, compiled probably in the 8 th cent. but included in the stage one redaction in the 7 th cent., while the reference to the future conception, birth and naming of Sarah’s child is accepted as P source, compiled late in the 5 th Cent. but included in the stage three redaction in the 4 th cent.. In the circumstances of the time it is quite conceivable that either the compiler of the P source material or the redactors sought to                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
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Puritan responses to antinomianism in the context of reformed covenant theology: 1630 1696

Puritan responses to antinomianism in the context of reformed covenant theology: 1630 1696

Though Michael Brown suggests that Petto may have been associated with the Fifth Monarchists—a group which believed that in 1666, Christ’s kingdom would be ushered in by civil political means—it is unclear how much evidence supports this. 616 What is more, Petto makes scant political references in his extant books. If John Owen’s politics were a major contributing factor to Richard Baxter’s awareness and dislike of Owen, perhaps it was Petto’s silence on matters civil that kept him from being noticed by the anti-antinomians. 617 Still, there were plenty of reasons that Petto should have provoked their ire. Firstly, he was an Independent, which men like Robert Baillie were sure indicated antinomian convictions. 618 Secondly, he had directly engaged some of Baxter’s peculiar doctrines. This, it seemed, was all it took to make Baxter suspect a person of antinomianism. 619 Thirdly, Petto shared the anti- legal theological conviction of many alleged antinomians, though he was able to express this in more orthodox ways. Instead of advocating justification from eternity or the idea that God cannot see sin in his elect, Petto used the doctrine of the Mosaic covenant being a covenant of works to oppose the imposition of the Ten Commandments on Christians as the condition of their acceptance before God.                                                                                                                
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The Contributions of Natural Law and Covenant Thought as Sources for Public Theology

The Contributions of Natural Law and Covenant Thought as Sources for Public Theology

The natural law and covenant traditions contain elements that continue to be helpful in discussing the role that religious and moral thought play in modem democracies that are [r]

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The Potential for the United States Joining the Covenant Family

The Potential for the United States Joining the Covenant Family

Considering, after all, that the establishment of the United Nations was an idea of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and that the Commission on Human Rights was[r]

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Landlord and Tenant—Waste—Implied Covenant Restricting Use of Premises

Landlord and Tenant—Waste—Implied Covenant Restricting Use of Premises

In the instant case the court decided two issues-whether the altera- tion would constitute waste and whether there was an implied covenant to use the premises onl[r]

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