Creative curriculum

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CURRICULUM Creative Curriculum Philosophy The Curriculum objectives include:

CURRICULUM Creative Curriculum Philosophy The Curriculum objectives include:

With The Creative Curriculum ® , every program can put together a complete system that promotes positive outcomes for all children, including English-language learners, children with disabilities, and advanced learners. More information on Creative Curriculum can be found at www.teachingstrategies.com .

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Was it right to abandon the ‘Creative Curriculum’?

Was it right to abandon the ‘Creative Curriculum’?

Staff and pupils perceived the implementation of the curriculum to have had a positive effect on the teaching and learning of foundation subjects. Staff expressed their own enjoyment of the flexibility and freedom afforded to them as they planned themes. All the staff pointed to enriched learning experiences and higher levels of motivation in staff and children alike. It was also felt that this ‘creative curriculum’ had led to a more personalised experience with children now accessing their learning in different ways. Children echoed this perception, with the majority of them expressing high levels of enjoyment, involvement and interest in the afternoon curriculum. This was evidenced by children bringing in resources and completing extra work relating to their learning at home. Children were also able to show an understanding of their learning as they clearly articulated what they liked and disliked about their ‘theme’ learning
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The Creative Curriculum for Preschool

The Creative Curriculum for Preschool

Child uses measurement vocabulary (e.g., length, weight, height) and comparative terminology (e.g., more, less, shorter, longer, heaviest, lightest), with teacher support and multiple [r]

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Promoting a creative curriculum and achieving high standards: primary leadership considerations

Promoting a creative curriculum and achieving high standards: primary leadership considerations

The clear message from the leaders in these schools was that high standards result from an emphasis on creative, cross-curricular and skills-based learning, engendering an enjoyment of learning but with a rigorous emphasis on skills development and progress. Central to its achievement was the role of

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Lifting the lid on the creative curriculum: how leaders have released creativity in their schools through curriculum ownership

Lifting the lid on the creative curriculum: how leaders have released creativity in their schools through curriculum ownership

• Emphasis on music and languages: the children learn five languages: Spanish, Italian, French, German and Chinese. The learning is as much about culture as about language and is taught in a creative way. Performing Arts is a very important part of their broad curriculum and the school holds music soirees twice a term. A large percentage of the children take part, as do staff and governors: “It’s a real family affair. Everyone joins in. Being creative is a social experience” (headteacher). Every child in the school learns the violin and also has an opportunity to learn brass or woodwind. Developing expertise is an important part of the school’s philosophy and the curriculum model they use reflects and magnifies this.
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The Creative Curriculum for Preschool: Objectives for Development & Learning

The Creative Curriculum for Preschool: Objectives for Development & Learning

The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework.[r]

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Born creative

Born creative

In chapter 10 David Lammy reflects on his role in the Creative Partnerships project and suggests that if government ‘is not going to have the money to actively encourage more artists, poets and drama groups to come into schools’, it needs to ‘make sure it does not stand in the way of them’. He also pleads for room in the curriculum for creativity, a theme picked up in chapter 2 in Anna Craft’s retrospective assessment of the contribution policy has made to bringing more creativity into education since the launch of Ken Robinson’s landmark report by National Advisory Committee for Creative and Cultural Education (NACCCE) in 1999. Many of the authors are sceptical that giving more control to teachers automatically equates to more creativity in the classroom. As Bernadette Duffy puts it, ‘We must not be tempted to narrow the curriculum and return to the outdated belief that concentrating only on literacy, numeracy and behaviour will strengthen early years practice.’
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Appendix: W. Item: Curriculum Course Guide - New High School Course/Honors Creative Writing Department: Instructional Services

Appendix: W. Item: Curriculum Course Guide - New High School Course/Honors Creative Writing Department: Instructional Services

Background/Historical Context: Creative Writing has been offered in our school district for several years and New Hanover High School would like to design an honors level version for Creative Writing. An honors level standard course of study has been written for this new developed course (attached).

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Creative Archaeology

Creative Archaeology

As colleagues within his chair-group on Archaeological Heritage Management, Willem always encouraged us to question the obvious and look for other directions. Accordingly, in this discussion paper we set out some possible directions to search for elements that embody a new form of archaeology, which may help to deal with present-day public, academic and political challenges. In our view, such an archaeology will be based foremost upon its social values, and upon a spirit that creates shared value, while actively exploring opportunities – an archaeology that is not primarily concerned with providing compliance and academic publications, but rather with creating narratives and public benefits. In contrast to prioritizing preservation and conservation values, we like to call this mode of practice and thinking ‘creative archaeology’.
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What are your hobbies and interests? Advocacy; Political; Creative Bead Work; Educational both Curriculum and Special needs Advocating for the blind

What are your hobbies and interests? Advocacy; Political; Creative Bead Work; Educational both Curriculum and Special needs Advocating for the blind

• Reading and listening to books, watching and recording movies, PC maintenance and repair, playing computer games, going out with friends and family. • reading and pen pals on the in[r]

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As a creative writer myself, will I become a more creative teacher?

As a creative writer myself, will I become a more creative teacher?

PowerPoint Presentation As a creative writer myself, will I become a more creative teacher? Dr Janice K Jones 2014 International Conference on Deep Languages Education Policy and Practices Stimulating[.]

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Interrogating creative theory and creative work : inside the games studio

Interrogating creative theory and creative work : inside the games studio

Industries such digital games, VFX, animation and new media are relatively new. They have experienced periods of rapid expansion and contraction during which the context in which creative labour is mobilised and managed has undergone significant change. We are now entering a period in games, in which that dynamic is changing again as some firms seek to capture value in the smartphone market, outside the control of publishers. But it would be naïve to believe that this heralds a new ‘back to the garage era’ of autonomous production. The gateway to new opportunities is firmly defined by Apple and Google (Parker, Cox and Thompson, 2014). Though research is always conducted in particular places and at particular times, we need to look at trends over time before attributing paradigm breaking characteristics to ‘exemplary’ industries. Hype attached to the early stages of the internet industry and web-based work (see Mayer-Ahuja and Wolf, 2007) is eerily familiar to those
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Being Creative

Being Creative

We all wish, then, that all glories gather together in the dynamics of “being creative” truly jumping alive ubi- quitous in our entire daily ongoing in Mother Nature, and concrete and personal at every moment of each of us living on and on. It is also thus that being creative constantly presses forward in sheer novelty forever fresh, afresh. All this creativity prevails and pervades personally in Mother Nature, all overwhelmingly joyous, and all thriving symbiotically one with another. After all, to create is to grow—together. To “create” is to grow, togeth- er, as the word “create” is related to “concrescence” (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 2008). Toge- therness is the secret essence of the dynamics of “being creative”.
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The Creative Commons

The Creative Commons

And this bal- ance, we believe, will enable a different kind of creativity: crea- tivity built upon a tradition of building upon the works of others, freely.. It has onl[r]

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Creative cities?

Creative cities?

The idea of the Creative City is the policy du jour, on everybody’s menu. What’s not to like? Who would want to be an ‘uncreative city’; even better if you can be the most creative city in the world. In a world where many cities have suffered either from de- industrialisation, or massive in-migration, there has been a lack of faith in traditional economic foundations to deliver; the desire for most is to attract the dwindling stock of mobile foreign direct investment, and hence bring new jobs.

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Cultivating creative commons: from creative regulation to regulatory commons

Cultivating creative commons: from creative regulation to regulatory commons

With Benkler’s, Lessig’s and Boyle’s both academic and activist contributions we reach a particular stage in the Commons discourse. At this stage, the need for the definition of a commons or public domain has been established. It is clear that there is a variety of opinions about what constitutes public domain or the commons as well as that there is a need for the emergence of entities that could carry forward the effort for the creation of this space following the example of the ecological organizations. Technologies and practices as demonstrated in the FLOSS movement indicate that it is possible that people still create intellectual goods in a non traditional IPR environment. The economic theories supporting these modes of production also illustrate that the main obstacle for following such models of production is the current legal system and the institutions based upon it. The emergence of new technologies, practices and institutions and the resistance of the existing ones are summarized in Benkler’s argument on the battle over the institutional ecosystem. The question that is posed at this point is which is the most effective strategy for building a public domain and whether the existing efforts, the Creative Commons in particular is one that actually facilitates the creation of such a public domain or commons or is instead facilitating the re-enforcement of property rights and undermines the long term efforts for a social change in favor of a public domain.
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Roco. Creative Co-op SHARE PROSPECTUS Roco Creative Ltd

Roco. Creative Co-op SHARE PROSPECTUS Roco Creative Ltd

Opening in November 2015 Roco Creative Co-op has transformed 3 of a row of 7 listed Georgain terrace houses into a hub for Sheffield’s designers, artists and makers. With an independent design store, deli, bookshop, galleries, studios and cafe bar we have set about building a vibrant space where work and play easily mix. On the 1st May 2016 we launched our next round of community shares to the public - exactly 2 years to the day since we launched our first share campaign to raise £200,000 to support the development of our fantastic space in the heart of the city. In total we successfully secured £1.2m of investment from social lenders Key Fund, Co-op Community Finance and Big Issue Invest who alongside our share holders understood our vision to develop a row of Georgian terrace into 15 studios, co-working space, a cafe-bar, deli, retail spaces, and galleries.
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Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics  Programme in Pécs

Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics Programme in Pécs

Effectiveness was measured by means of student questionnaires and qualitative methods of assessment. The findings show that the local projects had a positive impact on all stakeholders: the students and their parents, the teachers, the schools as well as the creative practitioners alike. The general opinion of school staff is that the programme triggered a positive development in the institution: a significantly more student-centred approach has developed and opportunities have opened that they had never considered before. The performance of the participating students significantly improved, and the achievement of socio-culturally disadvantaged students surpassed the nationwide average. In the wake of their children’s accounts parents have become increasingly cu- rious about the programmes; wishing to be included in school life and, through the programmes, becoming in- creasingly motivated about their children’s progress. As for the creative practitioners, i.e. the participating artists and art students, they have become leaders and implementers of community art projects. 4
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The equilibrium allocation of creative capital to R&D in a dynamic creative region

The equilibrium allocation of creative capital to R&D in a dynamic creative region

Lorenzen and Andersen [7] concentrate on 444 city regions in eight European countries and analyze the inter- play between the older concept of “centrality” and the newer concept of the “creative class”. Their analysis de- monstrates that the notion of centrality exerts a strong influence on what they call “urban hierarchies of creativ- ity”. In turn, “the study of creative urban city hierarchies yields new insights into the problem of centrality” ([7], p. 363). The statistical analysis conducted by Andersen et al. [8] shows that Florida’s creative class thesis is supported for larger Nordic cities but not as well for smaller Nordic cities. Challenging aspects of Florida’s cre- ative class thesis, Comunian et al. [9] conduct an empirical analysis and note that it is certainly not obvious that bohemian graduates can be agents of knowledge spillovers. Olfert and Partridge [10] maintain that it would be misguided to set policy to increase the livability of a community by increasing its cultural footprint.
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Creative universities and creative cities: exploring the geography of bohemian graduates in UK

Creative universities and creative cities: exploring the geography of bohemian graduates in UK

If we take the view that a city is creative when its productive structure includes a strong creative sector (i.e. the creative production oriented view), then we have to consider the role of the HEIs both as providers of knowledge and innovation (mainly in the form of knowledge spillovers) and providers of human capital (in the form of skilled creative workers). In the field of culture and arts & humanities, this innovation and knowledge transfer perspective has been overlooked and only recently some contributions both on the academic (Crossick, 2006, Taylor, 2005, Cunningham, 2004) and policy side (NESTA, 2007) addressed it. As Cunningham et al. suggests (2004, p. 4) “creative industries appear to be marginal within university-based research”. However, in the UK there are important example of new emerging partnerships in this area – for example CIBAS, the Creative Industries Business Advisory Service, supported by the University of Portsmouth or ICE, Institute for Creative Enterprise at Coventry University. Mould et al. (2009) also consider the example of Sheffield Hallam University involvement in the Sheffield Cultural Quarter. A relatively under-explored area so far is the role of universities in producing highly skilled creative workers. As Faggian and McCann (2006, Faggian and McCann, 2009) argue the primary role of the university system is being a conduit for bringing potential high quality undergraduate human capital into a region. The benefits of having a highly skilled labor pool far outweigh the benefits generated by knowledge spillovers. Hence, attracting and retaining higher human capital and creative individuals can be seen as a more effective and long-term strategy for local economic development (Mathur, 1999). The argument put forward by Florida (2002) suggests that this higher human capital level has connections also with the kind of urban environment and cultural setting that highly educated individual look for when making a location choice.
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