Creative Entrepreneurship

Top PDF Creative Entrepreneurship:

Creative entrepreneurship and resistance : countercultural entrepreneurs' discourses, structures and practices of liberation?

Creative entrepreneurship and resistance : countercultural entrepreneurs' discourses, structures and practices of liberation?

Their community of friends is involved in the band’s creative entrepreneurship in a wide variety of ways and integrated into many of their practices. This includes helping to fund the band’s new album, through a successful Kickstarter campaign, visiting the studio during recording, providing sleeping places on tour, creating artwork related to the band, and embodying their ties to the band through tattoos (these last two being presented in dedicated photo albums on Facebook). Of their regular summer “Pirate” tours of the Greek islands, they write: “the people and the band become one…together they unload the van, carry the stuff, jam, get wasted, dance and at the morning light they crash at the beaches” (http://www.cballrec.com/pirate/). Indeed, the band several times assert that the community, and especially the shared experience of live performance, is more important even than their own cultural artefacts: “this is not about the music anymore. This is so much more and if you’ve been there you’ve seen the magic” (Facebook post, 20/06/2011). Elsewhere they note that the band “just provided the soundtrack” (Facebook post, 20/06/2011).
Show more

17 Read more

Technological and Creative Entrepreneurship

Technological and Creative Entrepreneurship

Jerzy Buzek – Chairman of the European Parliament, Chairman of the Council of the Polish Chamber of Commerce for High Technology; Prof. Michał Kleiber – President[r]

9 Read more

Creative entrepreneurship and urban space: Exploring the location preferences of creative professionals in Αthens during the economic recession

Creative entrepreneurship and urban space: Exploring the location preferences of creative professionals in Αthens during the economic recession

1. INTRODUCTION Creativity is considered to be one of the driving forces of economic development, and creative individuals are often seen as key agents in neighbourhood revitalisation and improving urban competitiveness (e.g., Jacobs, 1969; Lloyd, 2002; Currid, 2007). Indeed, many local governments encourage the development of stimulating cultural districts or clusters by, and for, such individuals (e.g., Braun and Lavanga, 2007; Lavanga, 2020). In the context of the new knowledge-based economy, the question of where creativity is ‘‘localised’’ has become a pressing research topic, concomitant with the considerable attention devoted by policymakers to both the location choices of firms and spatial clustering processes (e.g., Ketels and Memedovic, 2008). In terms of the latter, two explanations compete: one that refers to agglomeration economies, or the location choices made by firms (cf. Scott, 2010); and the other to urban amenities, or the location choices made by individuals, who are then followed there by firms (cf. Florida, 2002). Traditionally, economic geographers have used the concept of ‘‘agglomeration economies’’ to explain the spatial clustering of industries. According to clustering theory, clusters will emerge because of the external economies of scale that arise from firms co-locating with other companies operating in the same industry (localisation economies, Marshall, 1920; Porter, 2000). The second explanation originates in Richard Florida’s theory of the creative class and the quality of place. This suggests that the quality of a place, or the bundle of social characteristics and amenities that define and shape its identity and render it attractive to the ‘‘creative class’’, is a key determinant of what draws creative individuals to particular localities (Florida, 2002). Firms in need of this type of human capital then settle where these people choose to reside. The elements that attract the creative class include a tolerant and open social atmosphere, the presence of cultural amenities and activities, a vibrant nightlife, and ethnic diversity.
Show more

34 Read more

Creative entrepreneurship and resistance : countercultural entrepreneurs' discourses, structures and practices of liberation?

Creative entrepreneurship and resistance : countercultural entrepreneurs' discourses, structures and practices of liberation?

In general, relatively little emphasis in the data collected was given to articulating, justifying, or decrying the marginal field position of the countercultural entrepreneurs studied. In contrast to my own study of punk rockers Rancid (Drakopoulou Dodd, 2014), the creative entrepreneurs in this sample constructed few discourses of powerlessness, focusing instead on building alternative systems, and engaging in alternative creative practices. Rather than seeking to enter, combat or resist the mainstream (with the partial exception of Vodka Juniors), the main efforts of this sample was on the co-creation of novel cultural artifacts This is the first, and unexpected, finding of the study; where I went hunting on the counter-cultural margins for resistance and rebellion, instead I found that the mainstream played little role in the lives of these creative entrepreneurs. Rather, the inherently relational nature of these processes, the critical importance of feeling as motive, process and outcome, and the pursuit of artistic excellence were the phenomena which rather engaged and energized study participants. Participants were centred towards their own worlds, beyond the mainstream (which they largely ignored), and were almost entirely engaged with the creative excellence, emotion and community this generated. It is to these findings that we now turn.
Show more

18 Read more

Innovative and Creative Entrepreneurship Support Services at Universities

Innovative and Creative Entrepreneurship Support Services at Universities

is managed. An integrated model requires an integrating management but also (and more importantly) a long term macro-perspective that also considers all those daily activities. Only an entrepreneurial university, as Clark (2004) defines it will be able to implement the ESS with the capacity to yield optimal results and will benefit in the end to the territory in the form of economic and social development. This means that the university must promote the entrepreneurship culture from a wide point of view making it a milestone for all the services. Therefore the support to an innovating business idea will become a habit and will reinforce the links between the university and those entrepreneurs that at any point in time looked for the university ESS support. This behaviour reinforces the social consideration of the university and its active role within the territory.
Show more

13 Read more

How to Teach Entrepreneurship to Communication and Creative Industries Students

How to Teach Entrepreneurship to Communication and Creative Industries Students

The CreBiz Study Module consists of two course blocks supporting the creation of understanding of what media and creative entrepreneurship and new venture creation are essentially about. The general framework in the Study Module is the entrepreneurial process8, where the entrepreneur is understood as someone, who perceives an opportunity and creates an organization to pursue it or implements it in an existing organisation. The entrepreneurial process involves all the functions, activities, and actions associated with perceiving opportunities and creating organizations to pursue them. The entrepreneurial process therefore provides the students not only with skills for new venture development, but also in developing initial innovative idea to enhance general working skills. The entrepreneurial process is run by academic professionals and business experts and mentors (this process is not commonly provided in
Show more

41 Read more

Exploring Transnational Entrepreneurship: On the Interface between International Entrepreneurship and Ethnic Entrepreneurship

Exploring Transnational Entrepreneurship: On the Interface between International Entrepreneurship and Ethnic Entrepreneurship

Horst is a 49 years old German entrepreneur who owns City Billack along with his wife, Lisa. The couple was previously settled in Munich, where Horst had his company and worked with BMW Formula 1. His life then was on the road, due to which he had less family life. This annoyed Lisa but he was doing a good business. Lisa herself has a Turkish origin. However, it was her grandparents who moved from Turkey to Germany and now she has no link with Turkey. All of their family members either live in Sweden or Germany. Lisa with her family used to come to Sweden to visit her sister every year. Somehow her sister convinced her to move to Sweden and they did move in 2008. It took a lot of effort to establish City Billack, a car furnishing company. “In the beginning we had to give it all that we had, but now we feel so proud,” said Lisa. Primarily, Horst brought labor from Germany and started doing work in Jönköping. But later they realized that it is really difficult to manage German employees and were also difficult to stay in business in Sweden being a German company. Therefore, they had to adapt to the Swedish market. Now they have a diversified set of staff, that includes 2 Swedes, 1 Spanish, 1 Iraqi and 1 Moroccan. However, the guy from Morocco has lived and worked in Germany for 10 years and was also offered to be a partner in the company, but he likes to become an employee. The pattern of their business explains that actually the couple is moving from transnational entrepreneurship towards ethnic entrepreneurship.
Show more

49 Read more

THE DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS ACTIVITY SHEET (SAS) WITH CHEMO-ENTREPRENEURSHIP ORIENTED ON COLLOID MATTER IN 11th GRADE TO TRAIN CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS

THE DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS ACTIVITY SHEET (SAS) WITH CHEMO-ENTREPRENEURSHIP ORIENTED ON COLLOID MATTER IN 11th GRADE TO TRAIN CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS

Based on Table 3 above, it can be obtained that all activities observed in each SAS were carried out with percentage of 100%. Activities in each SAS were adapted to the Chemo-Entrepreneurship approach to train creative thinking skills to students. It was appropriate with the characteristic of Chemo-Entrepreneurship approach [14] such as focus on value creation, connecting students to the outside world, letting students act on their knowledge and skill, and team based approach, so that it was formulated activities include communicating the phenomena which contained in the SAS, expressing ideas, compiling experimental designs, analyzing estimated production cost and making marketing strategies from colloidal product that produced. This is in accordance with experiment result [4] stated that there is a strong correlation between creativity and entrepreneurship. This is evident from the result of studentss activity observation which shown that component of creativity can be trained through Chemo- Entrepreneurship oriented learning.
Show more

7 Read more

OSU School of Entrepreneurship Riata Center for Entrepreneurship Veterans Entrepreneurship Program

OSU School of Entrepreneurship Riata Center for Entrepreneurship Veterans Entrepreneurship Program

VEP Specifics At the heart of VEP is an intense, eight-day training program at Oklahoma State University, which will cover topical modules comprising the critical areas of success for new and early stage ventures. These eight days are preceded by a five-week self-study component and are then followed by a 10-month period of mentorship and online peer-to-peer networking. This integrated model — a three phase program covering the key elements of successful entrepreneurship — offers an innovative and effective combination of focused, practical training in venture creation and growth, accompanied by a support structure for graduates of the program. VEP Phase I: Concept Development and Self Study
Show more

6 Read more

Entrepreneurship. What is meant by entrepreneurship? The. principles of. >>>> 1. What Is Entrepreneurship?

Entrepreneurship. What is meant by entrepreneurship? The. principles of. >>>> 1. What Is Entrepreneurship?

However, according to Andrew Zacharakis, a common mis- perception is that a business plan is primarily used for raising capital. Zacharakis, a professor of entrepreneurship at Babson College, suggests that the primary purpose of a business plan is to help entrepreneurs gain a deeper understanding of the opportunity they envision. He explains: “The business plan process helps the entrepreneur shape her original vision into a better opportunity by raising critical questions, researching answers for those questions, and then answering them.” Some entrepreneurs create two plans: a planning document for internal use and a marketing document for attracting outside investment. In this situation, the information in each plan is essentially the same, but the emphasis is somewhat different. For example, an internal document intended to guide the business does not need detailed biographies of the manage- ment. However, in a plan intended for marketing, the background and experience of management may be the most important feature.
Show more

22 Read more

Introduction: What Is “Creative Making As Creative Writing”?

Introduction: What Is “Creative Making As Creative Writing”?

Journal of Creative Writing Studies 2 Essay This special issue of the Journal of Creative Writing Studies centers on how creative writing changes when writers actively engage computers as our nonhuman collaborators. Creative writing has always involved creative making. Handwriting, paper, and occasionally needle and thread were technologies Emily Dickinson used to transfer the cadence of her poems to paper. Her hand- stitched “fascicles” (booklets) were flattened when they were printed in a massively accessible writing technology, the book. The online Emily Dickinson Archive makes Dickinson’s poetry yet more accessible than print, and remedies some of the infelicities caused by printing. Readers can zoom into an inscribed scrap of paper more closely than one could do using a magnifying glass at a rare books library. Dickinson demurred from sending her poems to a printer. Handwritten, they remain ungoverned by printing and typographic formats that standardized the expressiveness of her dashes, multidirectional layouts, gaps, and other uses of space. For Dickinson, as for many other pre-computational creative writers, the medium was always part of the message.
Show more

12 Read more

Creative cities: The cultural industries and the creative class

Creative cities: The cultural industries and the creative class

The great strength of the concept of the cultural industries is that it has had a firm basis in production, and that it is a socialised concept. This does not mean that the consumption dimensions can be ignored; in fact they need to be integrated. It is only at this point in the argument that it is safe to bring back the city as context for such socialised production. In such an argument the city is a ‘high- touch’ environment whereby ill-defined and fuzzy knowledges are exchanged – it is a varied informational field within which actors negotiate and filter, and produce, knowledge in a very uncertain wider environment. Unlike other areas of the economy, some aspects of cultural production (and consumption) can be codified and normalised, but many cannot; arguably, these are the most valuable ideas to this industry. Thus, key high value added interactions will continue to embed cultural production in a small number of unique parts of cities. Ironically, as cultural production is based upon a fashion model – a rapid turnover of product and a winner takes all market place - only some places will benefit from the economic activity and the social and cultural benefits. However, the elaboration of such a concept of the cultural industries and associated policies are beyond this paper (Hesmondhalgh and Pratt 2005; Pratt 2005). What is clear is that the notion of creative class contributes little to such an understanding, nor does it form a sound basis for policy making.
Show more

24 Read more

Cultural creative industries or 'creative' (cultural) industries?

Cultural creative industries or 'creative' (cultural) industries?

viability of Australia’s digital content industries. At the time there was view that clustering was a way to establish innovation districts and regions. Stuart Cunningham (2006) notes these reports finally cemented a shift from a ‘cultural policy’ framework to an ‘industry policy’ framework. The reports in turn led to state governments taking the initiative to think about the facilitation of creative clusters through investment policy and tax support measures. The most well known creative cluster in Australia today is the Creative Industry Precinct at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), which began operation in 2004. This was funded by the Queensland State Government as part of its Smart State Strategy, recognition of the future importance of the knowledge-based economy in Queensland. From 2003 to 2005 researchers at QUT worked on a mapping of employment in Queensland’s creative sectors. A report entitled Creativity is Big Business followed in 2005. Other state governments
Show more

17 Read more

Embedded creative workers and creative work in education

Embedded creative workers and creative work in education

‘Top down’ approaches which use census data to draw conclusions about the size of the creative workforce, such as the Trident, do not however reveal the whole picture of creative employment in education. Such approaches, we argue, need to be supplemented and extended by ‘bottom up’ approaches, such as graduate tracking surveys, in order for the contribution made to the education sector by creative workers or workers with creative qualifications to be more accurately evaluated and assessed. The reasons for this are several. A national census provides a snapshot of employment on a particular day in a particular country. Respondents detail their occupation based on their main income at the time of the survey. This will affect the calculation of (embedded creative) employment in several ways. First, the increasing number of creative and other workers who work in several jobs simultaneously will only be represented in the census in one occupation and industry segment. An artist or musician who earns their main income from their creative work but who also has a part-time, casual or sessional teaching job for example, will only appear in the census in their core creative occupation. Second, those creative workers who are employed as administrators, teachers, lecturers or researchers in formal primary, secondary or tertiary institutions, or in informal settings, must decide whether to
Show more

25 Read more

Winning and losing in the creative industries: an analysis of creative graduates' career opportunities across creative disciplines

Winning and losing in the creative industries: an analysis of creative graduates' career opportunities across creative disciplines

new policy agenda. Anecdotal case studies and reports highlight that the universities are already supporting the sector and its development. It should be noted, however, that, as in much New Labour policy interventions, there is little or no reference to the career difficulties faced by graduates in creative disciplines (Million +, 2008). Even more problematic is the lack of recognition that creative industries employers seem to be more attracted by the creative talent of individuals than their qualifications (Haukka, 2010) and that creative disciplines are taught mainly in non-Russell group universities (the ones which Million + mainly represents) which might have an effect on the salaries offered (see Comunian et al., 2010). Recently, Universities UK explored similar issues about the contribution of higher education to the creative economy. The creative
Show more

40 Read more

Schools as creative beacons II : creative partnerships, Coventry

Schools as creative beacons II : creative partnerships, Coventry

Much of the impetus behind the successful implementation of both the CP project and its evaluation at school B lay with the responsible teacher. This teacher had drawn in other members of the teaching staff, and had provided the main motor for the project. However, it was felt that there were a number of difficulties faced by the school in relation to both CPC and creative projects. School B had experienced difficulties with one of the CPC 'creatives' (a contracted artistic support worker), who was reported to have been unwilling to fit into the project as envisaged by the school. The creative's proposals for the CP project had, in fact, been rejected by a whole school staff meeting, and the contract was ended. There was also a feeling on the part of the school that CPC was too 'Napoleonic', too directional, in its desire to manage projects in schools. The school's view was that it should have greater autonomy, and that a more effective use of outside 'creatives' would be to help the skills of school staff, rather than providing direct input into projects. However, it was acknowledged that this would mean INSETs for teachers, and time was a barrier in that respect. Finally, it was felt that in school B the future success of CP style teaching and learning would depend on a much greater degree of involvement on the part of the school leadership team, something that had not occurred thus far.
Show more

37 Read more

Winning and losing in the creative industries: an analysis of creative graduates' career opportunities across

creative disciplines

Winning and losing in the creative industries: an analysis of creative graduates' career opportunities across creative disciplines

One key issue that seems to be unaddressed both by academics and policy makers is the diversity of careers and job patterns experienced by workers across the creative industries. There is a lack of comparative knowledge to enable us to better understand what kind of creative careers might provide economic rewards and what kind of creative sectors suffer more from unstable work structures and markets. Ultimately part of the problem arising by the Golden Age of New Labour Cultural policy is that it has been a Golden Age just for few and the creative industries became a rhetoric construction of the New Labour policy which hid some critical issues and realities (such as the poor career perspective of fine arts graduates) behind the larger positive economic trends mainly led by few highly commercial activities within the creative industries. This argument has previously been presented in relation to the national economic statistics available from the DCMS (Comunian, 2009; Oakley, 2006; C. Taylor, 2006), but it has never been treated in relation to the single individuals working in the creative industries.
Show more

38 Read more

Entrepreneurship, Economic Growth and Entrepreneurship Theories

Entrepreneurship, Economic Growth and Entrepreneurship Theories

Richard Cantillon developed one of the early theories of entrepreneurship in 1725 focused on the individual involved in an enterprise. He defined the entrepreneur as an individual who assumes risk, by buying at a certain price and selling at an uncertain price. At the time of the industrial revolution (1830), Jean Baptiste Say expanded the definition of an entrepreneur to include the possession of managerial skills. Say believed that an entrepreneur was able to coordinate and combine the factors of production. Later on, Joseph Schumpeter (1883-1950) also made a contribution to the discussion on entrepreneurship. Schumpeter introduced the concepts of new combinations which involve a change in product or process that existed for as long as the introduction of new combination of inputs was under way. Resultantly, Schumpeter described an entrepreneur as an innovator.
Show more

9 Read more

Schools as creative beacons : creative partnerships (CP), Coventry

Schools as creative beacons : creative partnerships (CP), Coventry

home group was managed and chaired by CP staff there was an emphasis on the home group’s monitoring role as the co-ordinators saw it as a forum to consult CP about details such as forms, delivery dates and ongoing negotiations.  Uncertain outcomes: the research outcomes of the CP projects are unclear to participants. Although in process terms, the outcomes were systematic evaluation and sustainability of creative activity in school, co-ordinators were naturally interested in shorter term and more tangible outcomes. It would be a good idea to suggest a range of possible outcomes at the very start of a project and to agree with the co-ordinators, as part of the project agreement, what these should be. This would remove the uncertainty from co-ordinators and, if these outcomes were linked to accountability, emphasise the efficient use of staff time. Outcomes have included presentations to the Talking Creative Lessons day, presentations to staff in school, submission of written or visual materials for accredited action research modules, and evaluations as part of the CP paperwork. All these are important outcomes but the current coordinators do not have a very clear view of their progress towards such outcomes.
Show more

16 Read more

Winning and losing in the creative industries. An analysis of creative graduates career opportunities across creative disciplines

Winning and losing in the creative industries. An analysis of creative graduates career opportunities across creative disciplines

Overall, the New Labour Cultural policy has promoted the creative industries and creative work as a whole but in fact the data show that only few of these sectors where able to deliver sustainable career perspectives and a healthy job market for student graduating in creative disciplines. Furthermore, it seems that attention towards the regional dimension of the creative economy did not have any particular affect on the uneven geography of opportunity offered to creative graduates. In particular, despite the geographical spread of HE institutions involved in this field, there are fewer opportunities for graduates in the UK regions and Greater London seem to be only place providing occupational opportunities. While we observe that for certain bohemian graduates employment patterns and salary are very close to the patterns of the overall graduates group in UK, for others the situation is more extreme. In particular we have seen expose the weak earnings conditions of craft, performing arts, film and television and fine arts graduates. Linked to this lower economic rewards is also the job stability offered by these sectors, compared to a relative more stable employment pattern available to advertising, architecture and writing and publishing students.
Show more

30 Read more

Show all 6855 documents...