Creative Leadership

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The Brain Management of Time and it's Correlative to the Creative Leadership of the Heads of Scientific Departments in the Faculties of Physical Education and Sports Sciences in Iraq

The Brain Management of Time and it's Correlative to the Creative Leadership of the Heads of Scientific Departments in the Faculties of Physical Education and Sports Sciences in Iraq

Which indicates that the interest of department heads or their ability to initiate creative production in the investment of time in this study significantly. Thus, we find that creative leadership has significant and important effects on time management, because time ends the qualities and scientific abilities of leaders. The more creative the leader, the less time he needs to manage his affairs. These scientific qualities differ from one leader to another, as well as inherited mental traits and psychological qualities in which time plays a role too.
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The Effect Of Creative Leadership And Knowledge Sharing On Employee Performance

The Effect Of Creative Leadership And Knowledge Sharing On Employee Performance

The conclusion which is obtained from this study is Creative Leadership (CL) and Knowledge Sharing (KS) have a positive and significant influence on Employee Performance in Bappeda of Lahat Regency. Creative Leadership (CL) has a greater influence than Knowledge Sharing (KS) on Employee Performance. Because Creative Leadership is a leader who can give new ideas from all sources owned and able to analyze problems that occur well so as to make the company run well and smoothly.

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An Agent-based Simulation of the Effectiveness of Creative Leadership

An Agent-based Simulation of the Effectiveness of Creative Leadership

The first experiment also investigated the effect of varying the invention-to-imitation ratio of both leader and followers on the diversity or number of different of actions implemented by agents. Previous results with EVOC had suggested that the beneficial effect of leadership on mean fitness of ideas is tempered by decreased diversity of ideas, and this echoed previous simulation findings that leadership can have adverse effects when agents can communicate (Gigliotta, Miglino, & Parisi, 2007). We wanted to know whether the decreased diversity associated with the presence of a leader was still observed when leaders are highly creative or highly uncreative compared to followers. We found that while in the early stages of a run, creative leadership (as well as the degree of creativity of followers) was associated with higher diversity, eventually all agents converged on what the leader was doing no matter how creative the leader (or how creative the followers). This suggests that in the long run leadership diminishes cultural diversity regardless of how creative the leader is. It is worth noting, however, that in this artificial world, unlike the real world, agents had only one task to accomplish. Further experiments will investigate whether these results hold true when the fitness function varies over time.
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Creative leadership? ‘It’s just the norm’

Creative leadership? ‘It’s just the norm’

Whilst school leaders “are responsible for creating and sustaining the learning environment and the conditions under which quality teaching and learning take place” (MCEECDYA 2008, 11), it has long been realised that successful leadership can play a highly significant role in the improvement of student learning (Leithwood et al. 2004). This is particularly evident in the way that school leaders “[create] the climate and conditions where teachers could teach and students could learn” (Dinham 2005, qoted in Dinham, Aubusson, and Brady 2008). Furthermore, school leaders strongly influence the likelihood of change in the ways that they shape the organizational conditions necessary for success (Fullan 2001) and when they “exercise moral purpose and personal courage to promote what is best for their students and achievable by their staffs” (Hargreaves 2004, 307). But this is far from a straightforward process. A school’s leadership may well generate the pre-conditions for improving student
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Innovation in headteacher induction: case study 5: LeaderLab, Center for Creative Leadership

Innovation in headteacher induction: case study 5: LeaderLab, Center for Creative Leadership

Feature Mean Rating Process Advisor 8.9 Program Structure 8.2 Action Planning 7.8 Diversity of Group 7.4 Artistic Activities 7.1 Acting 6.3 Journaling 6.3 Visioning 6.2 Change Partners 6[r]

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BOUNDARY SPANNING AND LEADERSHIP PERCEPTIONS IN CREATIVE ORGANIZATIONS: EVIDENCE FROM FOUR ORCHESTRAS

BOUNDARY SPANNING AND LEADERSHIP PERCEPTIONS IN CREATIVE ORGANIZATIONS: EVIDENCE FROM FOUR ORCHESTRAS

transactions through an evaluative screen of beliefs and standards’’ (Faulkner, 1973a, p. 156). As Koivunen and Wennes (2011, p. 54) argue, uses an ‘‘individualistic notion of leadership,’’ which ignores the role of musicians during the legitimation process. Second, the orchestra is an ideal place to investigate creative leadership because it has unique characteristics of creative organizations. For example, creative efforts of the orchestra are generally complex, novel, and ill-defined tasks (Faulkner, 1973a). Third, projects of the orchestra involve high degrees of interdependence among individuals of different functional expertise (Baker & Faulkner, 1991). Because of this interdependence, coordination among all musicians in real time is vital. Finally, the orchestra makes a formal distinction between different leadership roles (Faulkner, 1973b). This divide is important because each role entails different knowledge and information, including requirements for specific networks that enable these actors to contribute to the success of collective efforts by coordinating the activities in the orchestra.
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Creative cities?

Creative cities?

I want to use the rest of this article to focus on the third variety of ‘creative city’: that associated with the ‘production’ of culture. There has been much hype about the growth of the cultural and creative industries in recent years; in no small part egged on by the results of economic analyses, such as the DCMS mapping document, that highlighted the contribution of the ‘creative industries’ to economic output, jobs and exports. At a European level, for example, in excess of car manufacture and the chemical industries combined. Moreover, in some cities, the creative industries vie for third place in the whole economy (for example, London). Moreover, reports have recently shown that the creative industries continue to grow (unlike many other sectors).
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Being Creative

Being Creative

Still higher up, there exist probing excitements of creative power up to sheer novelty in Edison, in Einstein, and in many others. Thanks to them, all of us human persons now have things hitherto not-existent, such as tel- ephone and music recording, relativity against absolute space and time, splitting atoms into atomic power, as well as abolishment of human cruelty to human, slavery, witch hunt, and the like. At the top highest level, we see Confucius in brimming joys while living in life-long failures, and Chuang Tzu frivolous when profound, profound when frivolous, all to shine forth creativity in their incredible blends, failures and joy, frivolity and profundity.
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Born creative

Born creative

Our early years work has rightly changed how we welcome, approach and engage very young children and their families. It has also been at the forefront of significant organisational change, which aspires to locate audiences at the centre of all our work. As a result, we have become increasingly aware of the limitations of our infrastructure to fully support the quality early years engagement to which we aspire. Commitment to young children and their adults is firmly embedded in future plans. As part of a capital development programme, we will improve our infrastructure (toilet facilities, buggy parking and access). In addition, we aim to build on the social, exploratory and imaginative approach outlined – developing an atelier or learning studio (inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach to learning and creative spaces) with natural light, wall-sized windows, opening out into an art garden and park, communal tables and seating. This will be an exciting new resource and additional space for our work with early years, enabling us to get wet and messy and explore more fully the relationship between inside and outside, creativity and play. However, it will be predominantly in the public gallery spaces, surrounded by collections and objects that are unfamiliar and unknown to them, that young children will, if we let them, start to make meaning of the world around them and each other.
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Thought Leadership, Business Leadership, Community Leadership

Thought Leadership, Business Leadership, Community Leadership

Active identification and follow-through on each student’s set of learning objectives in the course is embedded directly into the program. All students will experience a core set of learning opportunities, such as application of core curriculum concepts and theories spanning the range of business school disciplines. However, the Capstone program’s content is so diverse that students can choose to emphasize specific areas, in addition to the core set, that are critical to their professional growth and careers; e.g., project management and leadership, organization design, change management, market and competitor research, risk identification and mitigation, financial analysis and pro forma design, implementation planning, business case/value proposition design, services design and pricing, marketing planning and design, governance, development/fundraising, communications, operations & supply chain management, leadership capabilities assessment, organization lifecycle analysis, etc. Starting this year, each student’s unique learning objectives will be formally identified and incorporated into the Research & Work Plan assignment. Though students are not specifically graded against these objectives, Capstone instructors will informally follow-up with them throughout the semester to confirm their progress and implicitly drive assurance of learning against them.
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The Creative Imagination

The Creative Imagination

in relating thing to the or suspended continued of the space slicing into work form as be struggled, or surface to line to appeared dissolved uncertainty into of v e qu re/ ground contai[r]

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Schools as creative beacons II : creative partnerships, Coventry

Schools as creative beacons II : creative partnerships, Coventry

The second exemplar CP project and evaluation, at school B, built upon an earlier, successful CP project, that had raised enthusiasm for creative teaching and learning throughout the school. Although plans to create a CP school research team and a creativity funding group had not been carried through, a school wide CP project was developed, involving mixed year group teaching, cross-curricular teaching and learning, and creative approaches to the subjects involving a range of teaching staff. Overall, it was felt by school staff that the CP project had been a success. It was greatly enjoyed by the pupils, especially the cross year group events, when children were combined into themed, mixed year groups. In addition, the project was valued by teaching staff who felt that it had helped to bring together the staff around a common teaching task. This was in the context of a school reorganisation in the previous year that had seen combined year group teaching teams being disbanded, resulting in a feeling of isolation among individual teachers.
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Winning and losing in the creative industries. An analysis of creative graduates career opportunities across creative disciplines

Winning and losing in the creative industries. An analysis of creative graduates career opportunities across creative disciplines

23 authors point out “there is a danger that ‘creativity’ and ‘culture’ will come to be seen as magic ingredients that will automatically transform education” (p. 13). New Labour cultural policy has translated in higher education provision in a belief that creativity and creative courses would automatically translate in employability and high economic competiveness, under the banner of the greater economic and social contribution of creative activities in our national economy. However, the data presented suggest that the creative skills of graduates in these disciplines are not fully valued and appreciated in the job market (both in creative and non creative occupations) and that the hype surrounding the creative industries has created an ‘economic bubble’ that has further expanded the provision of those skills without real corresponding opportunities. Lower economic rewards are then linked back to issues of oversupply already identified by Towse (2001) and Abbings (2002) This also reflects in the geography of opportunities. While the New Labour cultural policy has tried to address the disparity of infrastructure and opportunities available across the UK regions, in line with other studies (Clifton, 2008, Comunian and Faggian, forthcoming), we find that opportunities for careers in the creative occupations are strongly concentrated in London and the South East. While the expansion of the higher education sector and of new higher education institutions specifically catering for creative subjects might be part of a long-term strategy of attraction and retention, it seems to have very little chances of success when job opportunities are still highly concentrate in few key urban areas (Comunian and Faggian, forthcoming).
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Schools as creative beacons : creative partnerships (CP), Coventry

Schools as creative beacons : creative partnerships (CP), Coventry

home group was managed and chaired by CP staff there was an emphasis on the home group’s monitoring role as the co-ordinators saw it as a forum to consult CP about details such as forms, delivery dates and ongoing negotiations.  Uncertain outcomes: the research outcomes of the CP projects are unclear to participants. Although in process terms, the outcomes were systematic evaluation and sustainability of creative activity in school, co-ordinators were naturally interested in shorter term and more tangible outcomes. It would be a good idea to suggest a range of possible outcomes at the very start of a project and to agree with the co-ordinators, as part of the project agreement, what these should be. This would remove the uncertainty from co-ordinators and, if these outcomes were linked to accountability, emphasise the efficient use of staff time. Outcomes have included presentations to the Talking Creative Lessons day, presentations to staff in school, submission of written or visual materials for accredited action research modules, and evaluations as part of the CP paperwork. All these are important outcomes but the current coordinators do not have a very clear view of their progress towards such outcomes.
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Creative producer: About creative contributions film producer

Creative producer: About creative contributions film producer

prilagoditi  zahtjevima  ili  propozicijama  druge  strane  kompromitirajući  time  svoj  integritet   i  integritet  projekta...  Pronalaženje  odgovarajućih  kreativnih [r]

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Creative Archaeology

Creative Archaeology

history) is recognized on a global scale as a human right, this might open up new streams of seeking CSR support, we should not forget that many policy discourses such as ‘social inclusion’, ‘sustainable cities’ and ‘intergenerational equality’ already provide many opportunities for finding support for our work. However, simply asking for philanthropic support is not ‘creative’ – rather, our discipline needs to think proactively about how we align our work in such a way that it creates shared value for commercial partners. Examples of creating such shared social values might well lie in providing companies and CSR agendas with the right stories, identities and engaging field practises that fit their brands, products and consumers’ needs (Groot, forthcoming). This would not only create exciting new partnerships and, admittedly, challenges, but also new opportunities for alternative funding.
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Creative Clusters: Towards the governance of the creative industries production system?

Creative Clusters: Towards the governance of the creative industries production system?

local and regional economies worldwide. Whilst novel data collection in some regions has provided an evidential basis for these claims the question of which policies, if any, might be best applied to these industries is still open. The current favourite policy idea and governance tool is the notion of the creative cluster. This paper sets out to examine if the notion of creative cluster is both robust and appropriate for such a task. It is important to add a caveat here. Not all creative industries are market orientated, and even those that are may not be so all the time: creative industries, and especially their practitioners, are commonly active across the margins of the arts and economic activities. This fact generates tensions between arts, social and economic policy makers and practitioners. However, there is not space to deal with this matter more fully here and this paper deals only with the 'market facing' aspects of the creative industries.
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Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics  Programme in Pécs

Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics Programme in Pécs

The second stage of the programme was launched in the spring semester of the 2014/2015 school year in the context of the Educational Authority’s priority project SROP-3.1.1-11/1-2012-0001 21 st Century School Educa- tion: Development and Coordination (Second Phase), Creation of Innovative Networks and development of Educational Programmes. The Creative Partnerships programme appears in the project as a possible model of a network of regional partnerships whose goal it is to improve sub-par performance of schools in mathematics—a problem that does not involve nationwide networking but concerns the teachers of more than one institution. The programme was implemented with the approval of the Pécs School District and the full support of the heads of participating member schools. After consultations with the heads of schools three schools were selected with a Grade 5 class in each to serve as pilot sites. A Grade 5 class of another member school and one from a pilot school were chosen as control classes; the latter had never been involved in, and the teachers were not familiar with, the Creative Partnerships programme. The sociocultural and demographic indicators of the students were the same as those of the pilot classes.
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Creative Thinking and Decision-Making Processes in EFL Creative Writing

Creative Thinking and Decision-Making Processes in EFL Creative Writing

The category ‘Real life reasoning’ was coded each time the participants based their reasoning on real life logic. For example, creating the main character as a mediocre student so her parents demand that she stay after school, more precisely after nightfall, which the participant deems as the perfect time for scary things to happen. This category could illustrate how the creative process is still governed by our knowledge of the real world and does not enter into realms of complete disconnection from reality. It could also show a connection to the participant’s knowledge of the target language’s culture, since a lot of the decisions, especially with participant number one, were based on general knowledge about the American school system. The participant included a cultural reference to the English speaking world by including the concept of having to stay after school, which does not occur in the Slovene school system.
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Cultivating creative commons: from creative regulation to regulatory commons

Cultivating creative commons: from creative regulation to regulatory commons

An e2e model for regulatory production, as the one that CC advocates, aims at a reverse internalization process, where the regulatory instrument produced (the CC licences) has absorbed the native regulatory forms. This is the opposite from the normal focus of a regulatory instrument, that is, the imposition of a particular regulatory program of action on the population. Hence, the establishment of a licence-based regime supporting the sharing, reusing and remixing of material has to be seen as the result of CC’s broader efforts to give voice to such native regulatory forms. The existence of a common set of principles for all licences, has thus to be seen as an objective, as a “transient end result” rather as a departure point. Thus, fragmentation of the Commons will be gradually overcome as a result of a broader political process. Finally, the CC project may appear as conservative but what it seeks to preserve are native regulatory forms and creative practices, not Copyright’s mandates. In conclusion, CC is an e2e project that appears on the regulatory level and hence allows e2e to also emerge on the content level, since this is the native regulatory form on the Internet. In addition, CC is very difficult to evolve into a proprietary project because of both static and dynamic cultivators that push towards the direction of creative commons.
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