Criminology and Criminal Justice Research: Methods

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MSc in CRIMINOLOGY and CRIMINAL JUSTICE (RESEARCH METHODS) REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS 2008

MSc in CRIMINOLOGY and CRIMINAL JUSTICE (RESEARCH METHODS) REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS 2008

The Chair of Examiners would like to thank all of those involved in the examination process for the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Research Methods); those who served on the Board of Examiners, those who acted as Assessors, and, in particular, the Director of Examinations (Ann Kennedy) and the Examinations Officer (Julie Bass) who were available throughout the year for support and advice.

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MSc in CRIMINOLOGY and CRIMINAL JUSTICE (RESEARCH METHODS) REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS 2014

MSc in CRIMINOLOGY and CRIMINAL JUSTICE (RESEARCH METHODS) REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS 2014

Procedures and Problems During the academic year under review, the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice and the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Research Methods) together received six submissions to the Proctors under Examinations Regulations, Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations, Part 11, clauses 11.8 to 11.10. Such submissions are made “[i]f it comes to the notice of a candidate’s college before, during or after an examination that the candidate’s performance in any part of a University Examination is likely to be or has been affected by factors of which the examiners have no knowledge” (Examination Regulations 2013, p 34) and, when approved by the proctors, allow the Board of Examiners to take “such action as the Examiners may think suitable”. In total there were six such submissions in relation to five individual candidates, an increase on last year. These submissions were discussed by the Board and judgements made about the candidates’ results.
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MSc in CRIMINOLOGY and CRIMINAL JUSTICE REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS 2014

MSc in CRIMINOLOGY and CRIMINAL JUSTICE REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS 2014

During the academic year under review, the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice and the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Research Methods) together received six submissions to the Proctors under Examinations Regulations, Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations, Part 11, clauses 11.8 to 11.10. Such submissions are made “[i]f it comes to the notice of a candidate’s college before, during or after an examination that the candidate’s performance in any part of a University Examination is likely to be or has been affected by factors of which the examiners have no knowledge” (Examination Regulations 2013, p 34) and, when approved by the proctors, allow the Board of Examiners to take “such action as the Examiners may think suitable”. In total there were six such submissions in relation to five individual candidates, a reduction from last year. These submissions were discussed by the Board in some detail and judgements made about the candidates’ results.
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ABSTRACT. Shannon Womer Phaneuf, Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice

ABSTRACT. Shannon Womer Phaneuf, Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice

25 argued that schools have become agents of control that often use coercive measures that interfere with learning and result in an atmosphere of mistrust and resentment. Noguera (1995) echoed this sentiment. He suggested that traditional methods of social control such as metal detectors, zero tolerance policies, police officers, security guards, etc., contributed to systemic violence and had adverse impacts on the school climate and educational experience of all students. Noguera (1995) viewed the existing philosophical framework of schools as a carryover of a turn-of-the-century asylum which focused on control of clients. He contended the use of such rigid control measures make the school resemble prison-like ‘lock-down’ facilities for students (Noguera, 1995: 190). Prisons have more surveillance cameras, metal detectors, and locked doors than any other place in America, however they are the least safe places to be. Psychiatrist James Gilligan conducted research on the emotional and physical safety of incarcerated prisoners. He suggested that prisoners’ feelings of safety depend upon the extent to which they feel respected and treated fairly, and the degree to which they believe the authorities are in charge and care (Gilligan, 1996, 1997). The same goes for schools. Making schools more like prisons likely does very little for the emotional safety of students.
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5 FINAL AWARD: BSc (Hons) CRIMINOLOGY & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5 FINAL AWARD: BSc (Hons) CRIMINOLOGY & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

At Level 5 students study four compulsory modules relevant to the central focus of the degree: Sentencing and Punishment; Policing and Society; Research Methods for Criminologists; and Theories of Crime and Criminalisation. Optional modules include: Young People, Crime and Justice; Economics of Law, Crime and Punishment; Victims of Crime; State Crime; and Policing and the Law. Students are also introduced to qualitative and quantitative research through the Research Methods for Criminologists module which underpins their Level 6 dissertation. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the working and volunteering environment in the new (optional) Work, Volunteering and Criminal Justice Issues module.
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ORDINANCES Master of Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice Administration

ORDINANCES Master of Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice Administration

Hypothesis : Concept, Types & Significance, Research Design : Concept Types and Significance, Source of Data Collection : Primary and Secondary, Field and Documentary Guide, Tools of Data Collection : Interview guide, Schedule, Interview Schedule Observation and Questionnaire, Methods of Data Collection : Interview, Questionnaire, Observation and Case Study.

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RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. Professor Callie Marie Rennison Office: 500 LSC CRJU 5003

RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. Professor Callie Marie Rennison Office: 500 LSC CRJU 5003

appropriate source. Be sure to cite appropriately. Use APA format. Failure to use APA format will result in THE AWARDING OF A ZERO FOR YOUR PAPER. Use 12 point font and double space the paper. Papers must be in WORD document format. How long is the paper? Some people may use 40 pages to write an excellent paper. Others may be able to do a great job with 25 pages. An outsider who is ignorant of research methodology should be able to walk away from having read your paper with a great review of the books, with a great understanding of the methodology used in the books, and of your opinion/thoughts about the methodology backed up by research/literature/statistics of the several questions of interest. These imaginary readers should also understand clearly what you propose to do, why it is important, how you will do it and why it is a superior approach. There is no one here who can write a good graduate level paper for this assignment that is less than 25 pages. I repeat, if your paper is less than 25 pages, you are probably turning in a poor or failing paper. If so, you will be graded accordingly.
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Institute of Criminology & Criminal Justice. Course Outline

Institute of Criminology & Criminal Justice. Course Outline

The ‘Research Proposal’ will be approximately 1000-1500 words (11-12 font size, 4-6 double spaced pages), sources should be properly referenced (i.e. in-text citations/footnotes and bibliography), and the writing should contain little to no grammar or spelling errors. Students will submit a digital copy (in Microsoft Word format) of their paper by 11:55pm on Friday, February 26 through electronic submission via the course’s CULearn webpage. The document should include a separate title page with the date, your full name and student ID#, working title of research project, course code (CRCJ3003: Legal Research Methods) and
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What methods are most frequently used in research in criminology and criminal justice?

What methods are most frequently used in research in criminology and criminal justice?

Attention was concentrated on the “consensus” journals, those that had most consistently appeared in these lists. It was also important to cover any newer journals that could not be included in earlier lists because the journals were created fairly recently. It would be undesirable for the selection of leading journals to be out of date, and thereby reflect prestige confined to earlier eras. As it happens, one of the more recent ranking efforts yielded a list of journals that met all these requirements. Williams and his colleagues (1992) asked a sample of over 250 members of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences to rate, on a scale from 0 to 10, the prestige of the leading criminology and criminal justice journals. The following journals were found to be the seven most highly rated (ratings in parentheses): Criminology (CR, 8.7), Journal of Crim- inal Law and Criminology (JCLC, 8.2), Justice Quarterly (JQ, 8.0), Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency (JRCD, 7.9), Crime and Delinquency (CD, 7.6), Journal of Criminal Justice (JCJ, 7.3), and Journal of Quantitative Criminology (JQC, 7.3). Taking into account the eras covered by various rating studies and the years when journals began to publish, all these journals also consistently appeared in the top ranks of lists of leading journals in the field (Cohn & Farrington, 1990; Regoli et al., 1982; Shichor et al., 1981; Sorenson et al., 1993). Articles in these seven journals therefore were covered.
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A Guide to Criminology and Criminal Justice Postgraduate Certificate( diploma)Diploma/MA)

A Guide to Criminology and Criminal Justice Postgraduate Certificate( diploma)Diploma/MA)

The assessment methods involve individual and group analysis and presentation of case studies, essay writing, evaluation and comparison of theories as well as exams for some modules. MA students will undertake an independent formulation and presentation of a research proposal, critical review of research papers and a substantial supervised dissertation.

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Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice. Spring 2012 Undergraduate Textbook Adoptions

Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice. Spring 2012 Undergraduate Textbook Adoptions

ISBN: 1256385468 (package with printed text and access Course Connect Access Code) E-book option available once access code is entered through Blackboard.. Access Code Only: 0558847633[r]

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MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Michaelmas Term Criminal Justice, Migration and Citizenship. Prof. Mary Bosworth and Prof.

MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Michaelmas Term Criminal Justice, Migration and Citizenship. Prof. Mary Bosworth and Prof.

This seminar explores the emerging field of criminological literature on immigration detention centres paying particular attention to their purpose, effect and nature. What are we to make of these places that look so much like prisons yet are not part of the criminal justice system? What are they for and what are they like?

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HILLSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice Studies. Degrees and Programs. Criminology Law Enforcement

HILLSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice Studies. Degrees and Programs. Criminology Law Enforcement

The Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies offers students a broad back- ground in history, philosophy, organization, management and operation of the criminal justice system. Upon completion, this degree opens up entry-level, non-sworn positions in local, state, and federal agencies, such as Ju- venile Justice, Private Security, Private Investi- gation, Loss Prevention, Law Enforcement, Corrections, Probation and Parole, Detention Centers, Community-based Intervention Pro- grams, and Crime Scene Technician. This program is also beneficial to professionals within these fields who are seeking incentive benefits or career enhancement. In addition, this program can be useful as a first step to- ward a career in sworn law enforcement, cor- rections, and probation as well as public ser- vice or law.
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Criminology and Justice

Criminology and Justice

Public Opinion of Crime, Criminals, and Criminal Justice 17 PUBLIC REACTIONS TO CRIME AND PUBLIC POLICY 24.. Possession of Guns 24 Vigilantism 25 Neighborhood Crime Prevention Associa[r]

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Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Certification Standards for College/University Criminal Justice/Criminology Baccalaureate Degree Programs

Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Certification Standards for College/University Criminal Justice/Criminology Baccalaureate Degree Programs

B.8 The purpose of undergraduate programs in criminal justice/criminology is to educate students to be critical thinkers who can communicate their thoughts effectively in oral and written form. Programs should familiarize students with facts and concepts and teach students to apply this knowledge to related problems and changing situations. Primary objectives of all criminal justice/criminology programs include the development of critical thinking; communication,

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How To Get A Criminal Justice/Criminology Degree At Chaminade University

How To Get A Criminal Justice/Criminology Degree At Chaminade University

The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Program Accreditation process is rigorous and detailed. In most details we comply and excel, the one lingering aspect of default is in the number of faculty. The accreditation process is expensive and depending on the number of days spent on campus can exceed $9000. The end result would be a determination of lack of compliance regarding faculty number and a proposed revisit. Our curriculum reflects the Academies rigid standards and our faculty are highly productive. It would be prudent to postpone professional accreditation until faculty staffing can be supplemented.
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Criminology and Criminal Justice Hit Parade: Measuring Academic Productivity in the Discipline

Criminology and Criminal Justice Hit Parade: Measuring Academic Productivity in the Discipline

Readers should be aware of several caveats when interpreting the findings. First, our findings are based on tenure-earning faculty in CCJ Ph.D. granting programs. While this represents a significant portion of faculty, it does not reflect all, nor even the majority of them. Many top scholars in the field are housed in sociology departments or non-Ph.D. granting departments. Thus, many who have made other lists do not appear on ours. Second, Scopus is a useful and powerful database for determining productivity measures, but it is not comprehensive. Many journals where CCJ faculty publish are not included within the Scopus database. A notable journal that is excluded from the data- base is Criminology & Public Policy, which has a high prestige ranking among CCJ faculty (Sorensen, 2009; Sorensen, Snell, & Rodriguez, 2006). Since cita- tions from this journal are eliminated in productivity measures, faculty who publish in this journal and others that are not indexed by Scopus may have artificially lower citation scores than what our analysis shows. Harzing’s Pub- lish or Perish, driven by Google Scholar search crawlers, enables a wider breadth of search capacity and can be an extremely effective tool when used responsibly and correctly (Harzing, 2010). Yet, neither Publish or Perish nor Scopus includes books as primary sources or as sources for citations, which severely limits those scholars who have produced many scholarly books. This issue comes into distinct focus when examining the list of top full professors.
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Course Outline. COURSE: CRCJ 1000 Introduction to Criminology & Criminal Justice

Course Outline. COURSE: CRCJ 1000 Introduction to Criminology & Criminal Justice

During the course, students will explore key aspects of the emergence of criminology as an academic discipline, numerous theories around crime and criminality, and several key issues related to contemporary criminal justice. We will learn various ways to define and conceptualize “crimes,” the basic structures of Canada’s criminal justice system, theories of punishment, studies of policing and police work, the centrality of crime statistics to our social understanding of criminality, as well as discussing a number of diverse

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Long term recovery from addiction : criminal justice involvement and positive criminology?

Long term recovery from addiction : criminal justice involvement and positive criminology?

Positive criminology has recently been put forward as a perspective that can incorporate a range of theories and models which emphasise ‘positive experiences that may potentially prevent or discourage continued criminal behavior’ (Ronel and Elisha, 2011 p.305). Across a range of disciplines a strengths based model has become increasingly prominent (Ronel and Elisha, 2011), building on the work of positive psychology (Seligman, 2002), asset-based community development models (e.g. McKnight and Block, 2010) and the emergence of a recovery movement in mental health (e.g. Slade, 2009), alcohol and drugs (White, 2009; Best, 2012) and criminal justice (Ronel and Elisha, 2011). In both mental health and the addictions field this has represented a significant paradigm shift and so the slow emergence of a supporting literature. Humphreys and Lembke (2013) have argued that there are three areas of solid empirical support for a recovery model in addiction – around the importance of recovery housing, around the positive role of the mutual aid groups, in particular the 12-step fellowships, and around peer-based delivery of interventions.
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Criminal Justice Research Consortium

Criminal Justice Research Consortium

Research Mr Hovel is an Honorary Senior Lecturer for the School of Rural Health and works as Regional Health Services Manager for Pacific Shores Healthcare (a private health care provider contracted to Justice Health to provide health services in many of the State's public prisons). His research interests lie in psychiatric and geriatric nursing, health service management in prison, spread of blood borne diseases (AIDS and hepatitis B&C) in prisons, preventative public health measures such as needle exchange programs in the prison system, and community risks associated with the spread of blood borne diseases from prison populations to general populations when prisoners have served their time.
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