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An overview on Robotic Applications for Cultural Heritage and Built Cultural Heritage

An overview on Robotic Applications for Cultural Heritage and Built Cultural Heritage

Focus is an overview on Robotics application for Cultural heritage and Built Cultural Heritage (a term that includes all the Architectural, Archaeological, and generally constructed artifacts). In the field of analysis and restoration of Cultural Heritage and Built Cultural Heritage it is interesting to have accurate and efficient operating methodologies. Indeed, robots and robotic systems can be designed and used for these applications. The join between DART (Laboratory of Documentation, Analysis, Survey of Architecture and Territory), LARM (Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics) of Cassino University and the LAREA (LAboratorio di Rilievo E Architettura) of Tor Vergata University, it was an example in sharing different knowledges and competences and in developing innovative robotic applications, which are able to operate in Cultural Heritage and Built Cultural Heritage.
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Cultural Heritage. Solution Guide

Cultural Heritage. Solution Guide

The need for digitization is growing rapidly, with enhanced focus on information to the public, and preservation of information for the future. Many museums and libraries with valuable collections exiting possibilities which are made possible by the rapid growth of internet access for everyone. The history of Cultural Heritage photography is as long-standing as photography itself. Historic collections at museums or libraries often have had a photographic studio allocated for creating

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The Hidden Face of Cultural Heritage: a science window for the dissemination of elementary knowledge of risk and vulnerability in cultural heritage

The Hidden Face of Cultural Heritage: a science window for the dissemination of elementary knowledge of risk and vulnerability in cultural heritage

The Hidden Face of Cultural Heritage (ScW-CH) is a model designed for the dissemination of knowledge about risk in cultural heritage, led by researchers in col- laboration with museum specialists in order to make their studies about science and cultural heritage acces- sible to all demographics. An innovative methodology that simulates a showcase was designed to study the four levels of hazards and vulnerability knowledge in cul- tural heritage, that involves a thorough understanding of materials, artworks, analytical techniques, methods, and model of risks. The exhibition spread the multidiscipli- nary nature of cultural heritage preservation with “the Researchers’ Corner” where visitors could discover that the researchers are physicists, chemists, geologists, archi- tects, biologists, archaeologists, historians, restorers… working together as a team. The exhibition contained materials, equipments and information sheets to help the guides to accompany visitors as storytellers. All the con- tents were adapted to different types of visitors, achieving their interest about this subject.
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Tracing change in World Cultural Heritage : the recognition of intangible heritage

Tracing change in World Cultural Heritage : the recognition of intangible heritage

1984 meeting on a future program concerning the non-physical heritage is specifically important as it introduced an anthropological in contrast to a folkloristic approach. This approach focuses on processes, on social and cultural relations in societies rather than on objects or products. It found full implementation in the 1993 Living Human Treasures program, which aims at protecting knowledge and skills by addressing human beings as tradition-bearers themselves. In its context, the idea of tangible heritage in terms of architecture or place in general was abandoned. In the late 1990s, with the concept of cultural space the idea was reintroduced and the relationship between people and place emphasized. The recognition of processes instead of objects finally reached its climax in the early twenty- first century with the development of the concept of Intangible Cultural Heritage. While the 2003 Convention aims to safeguard intangible heritage expressions as an independent heritage category, its underlying theoretical conception reflects a re-theorization of cultural heritage. The Intangible Cultural Heritage is created and transmitted by human beings and may exist in relation to place. It is grounded in the local context. This understanding has also found its way into the ICOMOS discourse. First traces can be found in the late 1980s with the ideas of sacred sites and the non-built environment as well as the mention of the term intangible; a
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Cultural heritage and one of the UNESCO world heritage list, Cumalikizik

Cultural heritage and one of the UNESCO world heritage list, Cumalikizik

This action plan points out the fact that Cumalıkızık, one of the most prominent examples of Ottoman rural architecture, could be preserved without being demolished, what more, the people of our country may gain many economic advantages by protecting this legacy. While implementing that tourism- oriented action plan, however, it is quite important to consider the identity, the culture and the facts of historical environment. As a result of sustainable planning approach analyses, all the new designs have been proved to comply with the uncertainity situation that has existed coincidentally. Free approach has been used. It is clearly seen that these designs do not comply with historical environment As required by 6360 th law, new designs which were constructed before 2012 were given licence right after being assessed with building assessment form (Url 4). It can be argued that such kinds of designs on this historical environment, which has been added to UNESCO World Heritage List, are discourtesy for our cultural heritage.
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The New American Approach to Cultural Heritage Protection: Granting Foreign Aid for Iraqi Cultural Heritage

The New American Approach to Cultural Heritage Protection: Granting Foreign Aid for Iraqi Cultural Heritage

economic assistance USAID hopes to generate in projects dealing with small business funding and infrastructure development. 191 Tourist destinations need buildings, roads, running water, and other basic necessities that USAID provides in such initiatives. 192 The tourist destination concept would also foster economic growth by providing employment opportunities to locals, which will lead to the rebuilding of an entirely new city: housing complexes, transportation systems, and utility providers. In fact, this kind of aid is already being provided to Iraq as noted in the Congressional Report of 2004, detailing funding for Iraqi electricity, water, oil and sewage projects. 193 Therefore, the tourist funding for Babylon is merely the same kind of support the United States already gives Iraq – in this case, it is for cultural heritage preservation.
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The European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018: A turning point for the citizens’ movement supporting cultural heritage in Europe

The European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018: A turning point for the citizens’ movement supporting cultural heritage in Europe

The last years have paved the way for the significant development and better structuring of a pan-European movement of civil society supporting cultural heritage. The designation of 2018 as the European Year of Cultural Heritage – the only thematic year of the Juncker Commission – marked a turning point for this ever-growing movement. Firstly, because it represented a true milestone for the public recognition of cultural heritage as a unique resource for Europe. Secondly, because it saw an unprecedented Europe-wide and bottom-up mobilisation of heritage stakeholders. And thirdly, as it provided a playing field to put collective knowledge into practice, through effective multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral approaches. This article highlights the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018 as a huge opportunity for civil society action in the heritage field, and conversely, civil society action as a driver for heritage policy development in Europe. It also identifies three main challenges to be addressed in the future in order to sustain the legacy of the European Year. Firstly, to continue raising awareness and reaching out to citizens and stakeholders at the local level. Secondly, to find an adequate formula for a permanent cooperation and co-ordination on cultural heritage policies at EU level. And thirdly, to sustain and increase funding for cultural heritage in future EU programmes.
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ICT at the Service of Cultural Heritage

ICT at the Service of Cultural Heritage

• Promote an international network of professionals in both the fields of technology and cultural heritage for scientific research but also applied practical experience;. • Provide a[r]

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Cultural heritage in Balkan countries

Cultural heritage in Balkan countries

As libraries, archives and museums all over the world strive to make their contents accessible to everyone through the World Wide Web, they are becoming virtual destinations (Tonta, 2008). The development of standards and interoperable systems makes it possible to perform simultaneous “federated searches” on thousands of “open archives”. As such applications become more widespread, the number of stakeholders responsible for the protection and promotion of scientific and cultural heritage increases. Contributions to science, culture and art by different countries and societies become more visible and the scientific and cultural heritage of the humanity thus becomes more universal.
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Moral obligation or cultural heritage?

Moral obligation or cultural heritage?

independent, Germany was bound by the discussions in the Bundestag. In addition, the cultural heritage of the three countries greatly influenced their decisions. While France could easily merge R2P with their idea of the mission civilisatrice and the UK saw in R2P the rightful successor to the humanitarian intervention, Germany had to completely re-evaluate their opinion on the principle. The practical application of R2P could mean a break with their tradition of military constraint, which was strongly influenced by their guilt for the Second World War. In a strategic sense France and the UK were more ready to apply their armed forces for their political gains, where Germany had sworn to prevent any renewed German aggression. These cultural influences permeated the respective parliamentary debates. There could even be an argument made that if the USA, France and the UK had understood the German culture better, they might have persuaded Germany to join. If they had informed the German government of their plans to push for a more aggressive resolution before the debate in the Bundestag on 16 March, the outcome might have very different. As it stands the different political and strategic cultures of the
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Adapting Wikification to Cultural Heritage

Adapting Wikification to Cultural Heritage

This approach uses the category information to filter articles after WikiMiner has been run. Each article added by WikiMiner is examined and any which are more than a certain distance from a top- level category which has been identified as being relevant to cultural heritage is removed. The as- sumption behind this approach is that relevant ar- ticles are much more likely to be closely associ- ated with these categories than ones which are not relevant.

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Intangible Cultural Heritage and Trade

Intangible Cultural Heritage and Trade

Intangible heritage trade disputes are generally characterised by the need to balance the protection of intangible heritage and the promotion of free trade. Many such controversies arise during trade negotiations or are brought before the WTO Dispute Settlement Mechanism. The WTO panels do not have a specific mandate to assess the cultural implications of the disputes they are adjudicating. It is therefore no surprise that trade ‘courts’ have paid little attention to the cultural aspects of trade disputes. Nonetheless, intangible cultural heritage matters, and the existence of such disputes, can provoke a necessary and sustained reflection on whether international law is indeed a fragmented system by nature, or whether there are tools to promote better coordination among its various subfields.
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The Albanian Cultural Heritage on the Internet

The Albanian Cultural Heritage on the Internet

The paper discusses the implementation of an authoring system for the production of an interactive map for desktop (useful in the pre-travel stage) and for mobile (useful in the on- site stage), aiming to support the promotion of the cultural heritage. A first prototype has been developed including 13 heritage sites across the County of Tirana, which are supported by text and photographs supplied by the local partner, within the project ‘S.O.S. – Squiperia Open Source’, funded by the Apulia Region.

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Multimedia database of the cultural heritage of the Balkans

Multimedia database of the cultural heritage of the Balkans

This paper presents a system that is designed to organize a large amount of digitized multimedia material of intangible cultural heritage. The main motivation is the collection of documents that have been collected by a team from Balkan Studies in Belgrade for last twelve years. This system enables annotation and organization of this large collection into native XML database. The data can be annotated by spatial as well as non-spatial information, thus in this system both type of the informations of the queried data can be presented. Assigned non-spatial data are presented in text form, while spatial data are presented on a graphic that consists of geographic regions in the Balkans. In addition to this informations, multimedia content of those files can be read, listened to or watched. The system also enables spatial queries by consulting the graphic of geographic regions. The system is implemented in Java.
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Visual Metaphors for Semantic Cultural Heritage

Visual Metaphors for Semantic Cultural Heritage

itory of media resources through the conceptual mediation of an “archetype” of narrative nature. Targeted on the general audience, the project is aimed at encouraging the users to explore the repository in an immersive, engaging way, as a way to promote cultural enrichment and cultural heritage dissemination. In the next years, thanks to the advent of the paradigm of Linked Open Data [31], information about cultural heritage, including events, performances, collections, etc. will be available on the web from different sources, making heterogeneity the standard situation rather than an exception. So, Labyrinth is not targeted on a specific type of cultural heritage objects or media types: the assumption underlying the project is that cultural archetypes, being pervasive in Western culture, can be employed as a compass to help the user navigate a heterogeneous repository of cultural heritage objects. A. Overview of the system
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Gilberto Velho, “Anthropology and cultural heritage”

Gilberto Velho, “Anthropology and cultural heritage”

The author argues that anthropology can help define a much broader, richer and culturally more diverse concept of heritage. He advocates for a more dem- ocratic and pluralist State policy that takes into account the diversity and com- plexity of Brazilian society, valuing traditions, symbolic systems and cultural manifestations from all sectors. The preservation of the Terreiro de Candomblé Casa Branca, in Salvador, Bahia, is presented as an example of recognizing the legitimacy of a tradition that was until recently subject to discrimination and persecutions. The author argues that this broadening of the concept of cultural heritage is crucial to the constitution of a Brazilian society that values democ- racy, human rights, citizenship and its own memory as a nation.
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Cultural heritage communities: Technologies and challenges

Cultural heritage communities: Technologies and challenges

Monika is Quality Manager, Digital Cultural Heritage at the DEN Foundation (The Netherlands). She holds a BA in Dutch Studies and an MA in Books & Digital Media Stud- ies. Her main expertise includes assuring quality and evalu- ation for digital heritage projects and disseminating the re- sults to the heritage sector. She focuses on bridging the gap between technically detailed texts and easily understandable documentation of standards and emerging new technolo- gies, such as 3D, social media or Internet of Things, that are relevant for the digital heritage sector, now or in the near future.
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Cultural heritage planning : a new perspective

Cultural heritage planning : a new perspective

Applications for development which may affect the cultural heritage significance of a place registered on the Tasmanian Heritage Register or a place within a heritage area as defined by [r]

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Matching Cultural Heritage items to Wikipedia

Matching Cultural Heritage items to Wikipedia

of digitised Cultural Heritage (CH) items from Europe’s archives, museums, libraries and audio visual collections and providing access through a single portal. The main strength of Europeana lays in the vast number of items it contains. Sometimes, though, this quantity comes at the cost of a restricted amount of metadata, with many items having very short descriptions and a lack of rich contex- tual information. Wikipedia, in contrast, offers in-depth de- scriptions and links to related articles for many CH items, and is thus a natural target for automatic enrichment of CH items.
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Albanian Cultural Heritage in Digital Area

Albanian Cultural Heritage in Digital Area

Since a lot of digitization initiatives are under way over the entire world and taking into account the European Council Recommendation: “A common access point for Europe’s digital cultural heritage”, the digital initiatives could not be missed in Albania. In the end of XX century, at the time when “digital flowers” started to flourish day after day in “Albanian garden”, “garden librarians” became more conscientious for their increasing role in “Digital Revolution” by visualizing the future of users with the conviction that libraries in future will depend on what librarians have done today.
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