Cultural Studies in Education

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Cultural Studies as a Didactic Means of Improving Intercultural Language Education

Cultural Studies as a Didactic Means of Improving Intercultural Language Education

Cultural Studies as a research field in language pedagogy opens new horizons in examining and developing the university framework for modelling culture-oriented didactic space stimulating university students become competent intercultural speakers. Cultural Studies as a university subject is one of the important means of helping university students step-by step acquire necessary skills for fulfilling modern sociocultural roles from a cultural observer, communicative ethnographer, cultural mediator to an interpreter, translator and cultural facilitator, and in the long run it prepares them for professional intercultural communication. But a didactic success of any Cultural Studies as a university subject for the purposes of participating in intercultural l communication much depends on the principles underlying university courses. Among these principles of vital importance are the principles of teaching and learning languages & other Humanities in the context of dialogue of cultures and civilisations, creating didactically appropriate educational space and problem-oriented learning environment. But still much has been done in the theory and practice of pluricultural education and in the area of educational experiments in order to compare and make conclusions about the real outcomes of different culture-oriented approaches to university teaching, learning and assessing in different countries and educational establishments And the weakest link here is assessing intercultural or sociocultural competence.
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A CULTURAL STUDIES ANALYSIS OF LOGO IN EDUCATION

A CULTURAL STUDIES ANALYSIS OF LOGO IN EDUCATION

I have shown in the discussion of the moment of production in Chapter Five that in its early days Logo was a very unstable product, in a sense that certain characteristics of [r]

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1993 Doctor of Education. Concentration: Educational Leadership and Cultural Studies. University of Houston, Houston, Texas.

1993 Doctor of Education. Concentration: Educational Leadership and Cultural Studies. University of Houston, Houston, Texas.

33. Reich, A. Z., & DeFranco, A. L. (July 1992). Improving Hospitality Education Through Better Classroom Delivery Skills -- The Fundamentals of Presentation and Unique Delivery Techniques. Paper presented at the 1992 Annual CHRIE Conference. Orlando, Florida.

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Critical text analysis : linking language and cultural studies

Critical text analysis : linking language and cultural studies

At this point, it is useful to draw a distinction in principle between critical text analysis, as discussed above, and the broader project of critical pedagogy. Critical pedagogy is education which aims to improve social justice and raise the status of marginalised groups. It has long been advocated by those researchers and teachers who feel that education is a key setting for the promotion of these goals (Kincheloe 2008). Yet it is argued that critical pedagogy has been too often absent from foreign language education (Akbari 2008, Cots 2006, Wallace 2003). Such absence may occur in situations where language is taught as a technical skill, and students are not offered challenging content outside language learning itself.
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Australian cultural studies in an ‘Asian century’

Australian cultural studies in an ‘Asian century’

(outnumbering students from India almost two to one). They have been welcomed onto our campuses, let us recall, in response to a financial imperative that has arisen in universities due to federal government dis-investment in the higher education sector. But the issue here is not the danger that criticism of them equates to biting the hand that feeds us; rather, it is at a more fundamental level about basic pedagogical ethics and our responsibilities to our students. Based on four reported cases (at Monash, Sydney, ANU and Newcastle), in which students from China questioned content being taught by their lecturers (in passing: since when, we might wonder, is it ominous or reprehensible for students in the humanities classroom to disagree with their lecturers?), we are now effectively being asked, by Australian government and media spokespeople, to distrust a specific, ethno-nationally defined group of our own students: to interpret them as more misguided, more victim to false consciousness, more in need of political enlightenment, and more duplicitous than domestic students or students of any other national background; indeed we are invited to assume that they are sleeper agents of an enemy power intent on destroying Australian academic freedom. 18 Suffice to say that
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Necessity of Cultural Historical Heritage Education in Social Studies Teaching

Necessity of Cultural Historical Heritage Education in Social Studies Teaching

Some museums throughout the world were founded as “educational museums” since the mid-19 th century (Hooper-Greenhill, 1994). The first educational museum in the world, Haslemere Museum, was opened in 1894- 1895 (San, 1998). Art education through museums emerged in the 19 th century in the West. The European mu- seums became centers that collect information about the area, protect the nature and conduct social and cultural studies (Atasoy, 1978). Children museums have a long history in America where the first children museum was founded (Hooper-Greenhill, 1994; Şahan, 2005). Museums are non-profit living places that deals with archeol- ogy, art, science and people, collects, protects and displays any kind of product in people’s lives, becomes a bridge between the past and the future, provide entertainment to people with its education, information and re- search opportunities and supports learning and creativity. They are universal and have continuity (Mercin, 2002). In many countries and our country, museums have sustainability policies. While in some countries museums are autonomous in every aspect, in other countries, including Turkey, they work under a ministry (Taş & Yıldız, 2015). For example, in England museums and protected historical sites have resorted to many new methods to promote themselves. In Museums, displays and shows are increasing because of computer programs that can spread light and sound. Furthermore, protected historical sites are using actors in historical costumes to promote the sites (Corbishley, 2000; Güleç & Alkış, 2003). Since the Hittites, Sumerians, Urartians, Lydians, Phrygians, Ionians, Romans, Byzantines, Seljuks and Ottomans left uncountable traces and remains, our country is like an open museum. Each of our seven geographical regions has unique importance because of its natural beauty, his- torical remains and rural and urban sites. A total of 2,634,662 works are being displayed in 191 museums and 115 archeological sites under Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism (Emekli, 2005). In this context, the Gen- eral Directorate of Turkish Cultural Artifacts and Museums worked hard and our 10 cultural artifacts were add- ed to the UNESCO World Heritage List. 26 provisional artifacts were added to the UNESCO World Heritage List and Turkey implemented many national projects through non-governmental organizations
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The Final Issue Cultural Studies Review

The Final Issue Cultural Studies Review

Our inability to secure a future for Cultural Studies Review is personally disappointing for both of us. Yet we’re also aware of the factors in the higher-education sector which have exacerbated our predicament. It has been a source of enormous frustration to us that while high-quality journal articles continue to be one of the key measures of academic productivity and success, how high-quality journal articles are funded is poorly understood by far too many in the humanities and social sciences. By contrast, our colleagues in medicine and the sciences have engaged much more fully with the political economy of journal publishing. They have driven the move away from the small coterie of for-profit academic-journal publishers, a move that is now being bolstered by dynamic Open Access initiatives and public research-funding agencies worldwide insisting that they will not pay twice for research. Meanwhile academics in the humanities and social sciences often believe that they do not pay for journal publication because the costs are not distributed at the department or program level but hidden in central library budgets.
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Progressive Traditions: Cherokee Cultural Studies

Progressive Traditions: Cherokee Cultural Studies

Traditionalists had done so in the past, not just in times preceding European contact, but in their insistence on the very civilization programs that later critics have used as evidence of acquiescence to colonial imposition. Several instances testify to the Cherokees’ volitional control over education in the nation, from their near- expulsion of missionaries who had failed in their promises to provide instruction, to the community-built schools at Creek Path, to historian William McLoughlin’s general sense that “Missionary schools tended to be founded in response to local requests for them rather than according to any prearranged plan.” 21 The National Council’s advocacy of the introduction and maintenance of schools brought it at one point in 1819 to delegate John Ross and others to look into plans “to establish an endowment to support schools by selling a tract of its [the nation’s] land that would fetch a good price.” 22 They were successful in having the project included in the treaty they signed in February of 1819, allowing for the sale of twelve square miles to establish a school fund. 23 As late as 1833, Ross pressured Lewis Cass, Jackson’s Secretary of War, to learn “what disposition has been made of the lands reserved under the treaty of 1819 for the purpose of raising a school fund for our nation, and if sold, to state the amount of the proceeds and also the application made of the same.” 24 Such a transaction points up the deficiency of the monist characterization of traditionalism as uniformly
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Academics, Cultural Workers and Critical Labour Studies

Academics, Cultural Workers and Critical Labour Studies

institutions up to the late 1960s, 50 years on it is unrecognisable. Moreover, like the myth of egalitarianism in cultural work, it exerts its own toxic, silencing effects. Today precariousness rather than security is one of the defining experiences of academic life–particularly, but not exclusively, for younger or ‘career early’ staff (a designation that can now extend for one's entire ‘career’, given the few opportunities for development of secure employment.) Statistical data about the employment of academics shows the wholesale transformation of higher education over the last two decades, with the systematic casualisation of the workforce. In the UK, data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (2012) reveals that one third of academic staff in universities is employed on short-term, temporary contracts. But this figure excludes more than 82,000 people who are paid by the hour and therefore not counted in HESA’s salary statistics, suggesting that the true extent of casualisation is far greater–and increasing rapidly. Indeed, the number of teaching only staff on temporary contracts went up by one third between 2009/10 and 2011/12. According to the University and College Union, higher education is one of the most casualised sectors of employment in Britain; only the hospitality industry has a greater proportion of temporary workers and ‘casuals’.
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Cultural Studies and Anti-Consumerism: A Critical Encounter

Cultural Studies and Anti-Consumerism: A Critical Encounter

While their repertoires are disparate and in many cases incommensurable, anti- consumerist practices resonate with each other across their shared regard for the consumer market as an obstruction to some other ethical, moral, political, social or cultural objective. Indeed, anti-consumerism as a discursive formation therefore involves a cluster of articulations, in the sense developed by Laclau and Mouffe and popularised by Stuart Hall (Laclau and Mouffe, 1985; Hall 1997a, 1997b), certain of which resonate with others (as in the case of, say ecological feminism, left anti-globalization struggles and ethical culinary practices), while others threaten to break out into direct contest (as with religious critiques of consumer hedonism and countercultural anti-corporatism). As we explore below, it is important to be specific about the politics of the various practices that might be associated with the term. For some articulations to anti-consumerism clearly stretch the category to breaking point; for example, a recent book by Rod Dreher, an editorial writer for the Dallas Morning News, entitled Crunchy Cons: How
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Irish studies, cultural pluralism and the peace process

Irish studies, cultural pluralism and the peace process

Protestants, and it remains resolutely bicultural. For this reason we need to make a distinction between what might be called the old pluralist agenda, which culminated in the Good Friday Agreement (GFA), and the new pluralist agenda which is being opened up with the arrival in Ireland of immigrants from other European Union (EU) countries and beyond. Several exponents of Irish studies have claimed to have influenced the shape of the Agreement. The most persistent claim has come from political scientists, particularly advocates of consociational democracy 2 , but here I

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JOB DESCRIPTION. Theatre, Performance and Cultural Policy Studies. Centre for Cultural Policy Studies. Centre Director (Dr Chris Bilton)

JOB DESCRIPTION. Theatre, Performance and Cultural Policy Studies. Centre for Cultural Policy Studies. Centre Director (Dr Chris Bilton)

POST TITLE: Associate Professor in Culture, Media and Communication DEPARTMENT: School of Theatre, Performance and Cultural Policy Studies The Person Specification focuses on the knowledge, skills, experience and qualifications required to undertake the role effectively.

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Cultural Bias Education of Nursing Faculty

Cultural Bias Education of Nursing Faculty

competence seminar. The faculty were all full-time faculty with 40% holding a Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN) and the rest possessing either a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), both terminal doctorate degrees in nursing (Table 1). A total of 60% had no prior experience participating in a cultural competence class. The CENA self-reported levels of proficiency (Table 2) in cultural competence employed the scale of VERY, SOMEWHAT, and NOT AT ALL for the following categories: CLAS Standards, Health Disparities, Knowledge of other Cultures, and U.S. Demographics. The CLAS Standards represented the lowest self-reported level of proficiency with 34% reporting at least somewhat proficient. The highest self-reported level of proficiency at 100% was Knowledge of other Cultures. The levels of interest (Table 2) employed the same scale and the categories were the following: Self- Awareness, Educational Resources, Cultural Bias, and Knowledge and Skills. A total 73% of the nursing faculty reported that they were VERY interested in Educational Resources and Cultural Bias, thus representing the highest levels of interest for these two topics.
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Cultural diversity in undergraduate engineering education

Cultural diversity in undergraduate engineering education

The results of the study indicated that both engineering students and professional engineers believed the attainment of cultural competency is a valuable aspect of engineering curriculum. In general, there was a consensus between students and engineers that cultural diversity should be an important component of undergraduate engineering education. Although both groups agreed courses on cultural diversity were not emphasized in the undergraduate engineering curriculum, the students reported significantly more than professional engineers that their curriculum did include courses on cultural diversity. These results suggest a reversal of the trend that engineering students have had scarce opportunities for training in cultural diversity (Hoshino & Sanders, 2007). This shift may be paradigmatic of changing attitudes in higher education as pluralism has become an increasingly embraced ideal in the United States. It may also indicate the presence of international students in American engineering education programs is positively influencing the prospects of having cultural diversity courses in undergraduate engineering curriculum (Fischer, 2009; Burreli, 2010). It can be argued that because of the presence of international students and the diverse ethnic composition of the U.S. population, American colleges have possibly adapted their curriculum to serve their increasingly diverse student populations. This is a good start and the supposition is congruent with previous research has argued for the multi-cultural training of engineering students in the U.S. (Herbeaux & Bannerot, 2003).
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QUALITY OF HUMAN RESOURCES: EDUCATION Vol. I - Social and Cultural Issues of Education - E.A. Nozhin SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ISSUES OF EDUCATION

QUALITY OF HUMAN RESOURCES: EDUCATION Vol. I - Social and Cultural Issues of Education - E.A. Nozhin SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ISSUES OF EDUCATION

The humanization of education means its application to world culture, to history, and to spiritual values. In the relation system "people - society - environment" it is important to consider oneself as a component of the environment, to realize one's responsibility for future generations in the process of collaboration with the environment. Social and cultural education should contribute to the active humanitarian aspects of a citizen’s culture. In order to create a cardinally new noospheric set of relations within humankind it is necessary actively and radically to change the entire social consciousness.
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Exploring cultural differences in HCI education

Exploring cultural differences in HCI education

Kotze (2002) looks at HCI education in South Africa, which in many ways shares cultural similarities with Brazil in terms of the range of ethnic, cultural, language and educational background issues. Kotze argues that HCI is a critical subject that needs to be taught but South Africa has been slow to embrace it. This is due partly to the ICT industry, which is characterised by systems development with little consideration for human factors. There seems to be a problem with institutions and cultures taking HCI seriously. This is echoed by Smith et al. (2003) who indicate that in India where a large IT industry exists, HCI education has been neglected which is having an effect on the population and on India’s global marketability. Though India produces high-class engineering graduates, very few courses address HCI. However, over the last few years the HCI community in India has grown and the topic begins to be addressed at national level through events such as the India HCI conferences taking place annually since 2010.
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Special Education in China: Viewing Special Education Through a Cultural Lens

Special Education in China: Viewing Special Education Through a Cultural Lens

parents, they don’t want to admit it that’s their children has problems.” When talking about the positive effect parents can have, Hú Yǎjìng said, “And they [the parents] are the power, so we make it together so that they will not just affect one person but will be wider.” Teachers also said parents sometimes have a mistaken view of education by placing everything on teachers and not acknowledging that other factors can affect a child’s education. Mǎ Lín used an analogy to explain this: “So, their parents just think, ‘Oh, yeah! We invest in you, of course this flower should bloom!’ They will never think about, maybe the seeds has a problem, let’s fix the seeds first.” When asked if teachers are afraid to bring up disabilities to families and if families may try to hide disabilities, the same teacher responded, “Of course! I really can feel that people are not telling the truth because they don’t want to be in trouble…and the problem is, even you tell them, there won’t be any use” (Mǎ Lín). When teachers do bring up if a child is struggling in school, the news may elicit mixed responses from parents as explained by Hú Yǎjìng: “Some parents, they are really helpful, they say, ‘Ok you say this, I will help.’ Give me very good feedback. But some parents, it’s so hard, I want to give up.” Parents play a large role in a child’s life and their education, and numerous times throughout the interviews, teachers pointed out the need for parents’ support to give each child the most beneficial education.
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Navigating discourses of cultural literacy in teacher education

Navigating discourses of cultural literacy in teacher education

Much of the research on cultural education addresses gaps and deficits in pre-service teachers’ experiences, attitudes, and perceptions. Assuming a universal deficit in ‘cultural experiences’ for a diverse cohort of pre-service teachers is problematic, however there is an imperative for fostering particular social justice values and cultural relativity. Although recent research studies report a shift towards more positive attitudes about teaching culturally diverse students, persistent concerns plague pre-service teachers’ understanding of cultural diversity (Castro, 2010; Delano-Oriaran, 2012; Russell & Russell, 2014). This paper draws on a recent research project that evaluated systemic policies, frameworks and pre-service teacher perceptions on the curriculum redesign of a subject entitled Education for Cultural Diversity. This project provided an opportunity to critically reflect on frames informing the subject, the curriculum intent and the pre-service teacher experience. Our curriculum intent is for pre-service teachers to develop an “awareness that one’s worldview is not universal but is profoundly shaped by one’s life experiences, as mediated by a variety of factors, chief among them race/ethnicity, social class, and gender” (Villegas & Lucas, 2002, p. 27). Awareness of personal and professional worldview will assist future teachers in becoming culturally literate in their classrooms and school communities.
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Faculty. Education. EDUCATION Division of Organizational Studies

Faculty. Education. EDUCATION Division of Organizational Studies

The course covers the following areas in working with students with disabilities: 1) an overview of the process and procedures for providing special education services, 2) current advances in instructional and assistive technology, 3) preparation of IEP’s. Learning strategies in literacy, language arts and math will be applied to the development of a math unit for middle grades in special education.

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Cultural Impact on Online Education Quality Perception

Cultural Impact on Online Education Quality Perception

ƒ increasing global circulation of ideas and particularly Western pedagogical Systems and values, ƒ a rise of international and virtual organizations offering Web-based education and training. One of the more relevant contributions in this field of research can be identified in the paper written by Claire Bélisle “eLearning and Intercultural dimensions of learning theories and teaching models”, where the author describes how “designing elearning environments has required that educational actors clarify, rationalise and formalise their practices. In order to introduce mode coherence and relevancy, implicit cultural assumptions have had to be revisited, bringing about a deeper awareness of the kind of learning that schools and universities are specialised in and of the underlying choices of values and beliefs. In multicultural and multilingual societies, the implicit pedagogical assumptions of eLearning environments need to be made explicit” (Bélisle 2007).
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