Curriculum and Educational Technology

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Curriculum development for Educational Technology based on comparisons of course syllabi resources using lexical analysis

Curriculum development for Educational Technology based on comparisons of course syllabi resources using lexical analysis

HCI contribution to Learning Technology. A hybrid course, which covers human-computer interaction (HCI) and psychology, such as the Masters of Educational Technology and Applied Learning Science (METALS) course at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) [3], was analysed. The curriculum consists of an overview of online learning and research projects. The electives include education and learning science, human centred computing, user interface and applied cognitive sciences courses. As mentioned in the Introduction section, some of current demands for educational technology are the systematic development of the learning environment and the measurement and assessment of technical procedures throughout the
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Adopting educational technology to enhance the marketing curriculum: is it worth the effort?

Adopting educational technology to enhance the marketing curriculum: is it worth the effort?

qualitative data clearly indicates that students have modal preferences and perceive learning resources with higher representations of content to assist their comprehension, understanding and retention of content, and to be more interesting and enjoyable to use. In particular, students expressed a strong preference for a combination of learning resources and options. Given these findings, the importance of improving student progression and retention, and engendering a joy of learning leading to life-long learning, marketing educators should be encouraged to continue to explore the use of educational technology and multimedia for enhancing the marketing curriculum and developing multiple representations of content. It is difficult to make any inferences from the quantitative data regarding the impact of providing multiple representations of content on learning performance due to small sample and limitations of the experimental methodology. In addition to the small sample size, there was a predominance of higher-achieving students, multimodal learners and a lack of aural and visual learners in the sample. Given the literature indicates that multimodal learning may be of greater benefit to lower-achieving students, this may be one factor that explains the lack of impact of multiple representations of content on learning performance within this experiment (Zwyno, 2003). Future research should involve a larger sample, higher representation of lower-achieving students, and a more even representation across learning styles. In addition to exploring differences across learning styles and modal preferences, differences across gender and age groups, lower versus higher achieving students, English Second Language (ESL) versus English First Language students (EFL), and on-campus versus distance learners could also be investigated. Ideally, future research would involve investigating learning
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Part of the Curriculum and Instruction Commons, and the Educational Technology Commons

Part of the Curriculum and Instruction Commons, and the Educational Technology Commons

As web technology is maturing, the instructional design theories, learning theories and good pedagogy, which have proven successfully in traditional instruction should be applied to W[r]

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Adopting educational technology to enhance the marketing curriculum: is it worth the effort?

Adopting educational technology to enhance the marketing curriculum: is it worth the effort?

Consumer Behaviour B Exploration Studies and/or Conceptual Models The Impact of Marketing Planning, Market Orientation and Service Quality on Institutional Performance; an Evidence from [r]

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An Educational Technology Curriculum Emphasizing Systematic, Scientific Problem Solving

An Educational Technology Curriculum Emphasizing Systematic, Scientific Problem Solving

AIM OF THE DEPARTMENT The aim of DEST is to educate students to be able to solve problems arising from educa- tional practice.. The emphasis is on employ- ing relevant scientifi[r]

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Sculpture in Modern Environment: Educational Technology

Sculpture in Modern Environment: Educational Technology

Professional sculptors are trained at five specialized higher education institutions in Moscow and St. Petersburg: Moscow State Academic Art Institute named after V.I. Surikov [9], Russian Academy of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture named after I.S. Glazunov [10], St. Petersburg State Academy Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture named after I.E. Repin of the Russian Academy of Arts [11], Moscow State Academy of Industrial and Applied Arts named after S.G. Stgoranov [12] and St. Petersburg State Academy of Art and Design named after A.L. Stieglitz [13]. The full scope of all types and genres of sculpture (monumental sculpture, monumental and decorative sculpture, indoor sculpture — portrait and composition, small-scale sculpture, relief, medallic art, restoration) is taught in the first two institutions. The last three institutions focus on applied types of sculpture and consist only of one department “Monumental and decorative art (sculpture)”. Analysis of study programs shows commitment to academic style in all of the above-mentioned institutions. Stroganov Academy is an exception, which is largely explained by the fact that it has had experience of the VKHUTEMAS (Higher Art and Technical Studios). In 1920, the VKHUTEMAS developed a propaedeutic course “Volume” based on avant-garde principles (A. Lavinskii, B. Korolev, A. Babichev) about the most general abstract techniques of molding in sculpture. This course is still a part of the curriculum implemented at Stroganov Academy.
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An information technology competency model and curriculum

An information technology competency model and curriculum

It is important to note that the IT2017 task group does not seek to endorse the lecture format, even though it has used a metric with roots in a classical, lecture-oriented form. Given recent improvements in educational technology, other modes can be effective. The time specifications serve as a comparative metric, in the sense that 5 hours presumably takes approximately five times longer to achieve competency in a given unit than 1 hour. For example, in Table 1, learning activities in the competency area of Software Fundamentals (30 hours) should be double to the learning activities in the Platform Technologies (15 hours) competency area.
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Educational Technology Funding Models

Educational Technology Funding Models

One source in the literature pointed to outside consultants as one way to reduce IT waste in academia. Carlson (2004) argued that disorganization and waste is pervasive in information technology in higher education. Carlson noted that the greatest losses consultants see come from technology that is unused such as trendy programs or software that administrators purchase to compete with benchmark universities for prestige. Next, Carlson cites overpaid, internally promoted staff as a financial drain; though this is a difficult position to support given the low salaries academic IT staffs receive in comparison to IT opportunities in the private sector. Overlap of purchas- ing between departments, for example, several different departments buying site licenses for the same software is inefficient spending, according to Carlson. The structure of universities partially contributes to overlapping purchases. The lack of a central authority—the anarchistic organizational model common at colleges and universities—contributes to wasteful spending. Colleges and universities differ from business models in their purchasing practices due to the collegial organizational structure that involves more meetings, committees, and politics than the corporate environment. Consultants recommend viewing IT from the broader perspec- tive of a university’s mission, development of pedagogy and curriculum. Only after establishing institutional priorities should technology planning begin (Carlson, p. 35).
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Embedding Technology in Curriculum Design and Development

Embedding Technology in Curriculum Design and Development

Recent studies have revealed the fact that today‟s students have been born into a technologically rich world but they seem to be less avid and skilful users of technology. Further, mere access to technology will not serve the purpose. Meaningful utilization of technology and technological skills could lead to minimize the second-level digital divide.Language learning is not same as learning any other subject. Language is functional and requires purposeful usage. An ESL classroom generally aims at engaging learners in the language acquisition process. This task is challenging because the language is composed of components/skills like listening, speaking, reading and writing. In the present context, it is important to take cognizance of teacher training policies, examinations, the basic tenets of curriculum design and the array of digital tools that have become indispensable in our life. Employing mobile pedagogy for language learning does not imply a simple transmission of teaching and learning resources and practices but it entails a complete reframing. The presently available mobile applications are yet to be upgraded with this idea as they are often used for transmitting content and the scope for exploiting opportunities for communication and collaboration purposes to be explored seriously.
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TEAMING AND COMMMUNICATIONS IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM

TEAMING AND COMMMUNICATIONS IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM

A system has been established to track the progress of the EGR 103 students as they progress through the rest of the Engineering Technology curriculum. It will be interesting to determine how many of the original fourteen students remain in Engineering Technology versus how many discover, via EGR 103, that they should explore different career paths. In addition, the future performance of those who stay in the program will be monitored. The assessment team has identified student control groups consisting of members of EGR 103 classes of past semesters. A comparison will be made of student retention and student success rates between the team-taught EGR 103 and the conventional version of the course.
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Adaptive Ecosystem—Integrated Technology into the Curriculum

Adaptive Ecosystem—Integrated Technology into the Curriculum

For this transformation of existing educational structures, the effective participation of teachers becomes even more necessary for such a relationship of trust and partnership between the parties is the basis for a shared lea- dership and the development of autonomy. A digital ecosystem developed from the idea of offering different opportunities for teaching and learning, through, videos, images, games, graphics, text, interactive content, is- sues, among others, thereby contributing to the advancement in building knowledge.

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On the educational curriculum in finance and technology

On the educational curriculum in finance and technology

Acemoglu and Autor (2011) emphasize that the trends in modern labour markets require the distinction between skills and tasks. A task is a unit of work activity that produces output, while a skill is a worker’s endowment of capabilities for performing various tasks. The distinction becomes particularly relevant when workers of a given skill level can perform a variety of tasks and change the set of tasks that they perform in response to changes in labour market conditions and technology (Robinson, 2017). Acemoglu and Autor (2011) link the polarization of employment to the 'routinization' hypothesis and explore detailed changes in occupational structure across the US and OECD in light of that framework. Routine tasks are characteristic of many middle-skilled cognitive and routine jobs, such as book-keeping, clerical work and monitoring jobs. Technical advancement in this manner would complement either high skilled or low skilled personnel in their tasks. The supply of labour in the market, e.g. those who have completed their degrees, is deemed being in the “race” with the demand for skill emitting from the changes in the technology (Tinbergen, 1974). The traditional view on technological progress was that it especially affects the demand for roles that majorly consist of elements of routine tasks (Acemoglu and Autor, 2011). These are the middle-level skilled roles. However, when it comes to ICT in the fintech era, the transition that seems more relevant is that from routine cognitive (and even manual) skills to non-routine cognitive skills, involving primarily analytical, but sometimes even inter-personal, tasks (Aedo, et al., 2013). The design of fintech applications requires both an understanding of finance and high-level technical skills, e.g. in big-data management. These skills can be used to create artificial intelligence enhanced solutions, blockchain applications, cryptography - including smart contract - and financial- service applications on the internet. Such tasks are related to a broad spectrum of financial application, including how paying, investing, borrowing or receiving investment advice is conducted (He, et al., 2017).
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How To Define Educational Technology

How To Define Educational Technology

The field of educational technology has suffered from an identity crisis as it has struggled to define itself in the face of fast-paced historical, technological, and educational advancements. As online technologies have exploded into mainstream education and corporate training, the need for professionals who are highly qualified in designing, developing, implementing, and assessing instruction, as well as selecting appropriate technologies to support traditional and online programs, has increased. However, the roles and responsibilities of educational technologists have become as varied as the employers who hire them and the tools they use, causing confusion about what an educational technologist is and does. This paper provides: (1) a brief history of the educational technology field; (2) an overview of educational technology definitions; and (3) the results of a study conducted to ascertain what educational technology practitioners do, what skills they possess, and, in their own words, how they define their discipline. This study can help prospective students make informed decisions regarding their futures and serve as a starting point for interdisciplinary relationships between Educational Technology and CIS, IT, and CS, programs in higher education to prepare well-rounded graduates with highly marketable skills who are prepared for the increasing demands of the workplace.
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Distinguishing the Field of Educational Technology

Distinguishing the Field of Educational Technology

Simultaneously and in overlapping ways, a new professional field is coming into being and a new knowledge field (or professional discipline) is emerging. The differentiation is not clearly demarcated because in educational technology, the scholars and professionals in the field may well be the same people 2 . A profession is associated with an occupation, and often with specific sites (such as law with the courts). What adds confusion to the emerging profession of educational technology is that the university is one of the key contexts in which that occupation is located (the others being schools, and other sites where training and education take place). It is likely that professionals are employed in universities on non-academic conditions of service, thus differentiating those working as academics in the new scholarly field in some ways. Depending on the status of the practitioner’s position, the work may be invisible and professional knowledge unacknowledged.
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Information Technology Education IT Across the Curriculum

Information Technology Education IT Across the Curriculum

who: by faculty and staff of the university of massachusetts amherst campus; were members of a umass president's office information technology workforce development task force; expanded to include representatives from a number of academic units, including the social sciences, and the humanities and fine arts

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Evaluation of a technology curriculum in prevocational education

Evaluation of a technology curriculum in prevocational education

circumstances, so only five lessons remained. As basis for the technology curriculum, the phases associated with the pedagogical approach 'learning by design' are followed. Specific elements within this pedagogical approach can generate situational interest and enjoyment in technology. It is important to start with an authentic and appealing assignment. Therefore the managing director of the local and popular discotheque acts as the actual client for the project groups. He orders the project groups to each re-design one of the dancing rooms of the discotheque. The managing director and the teacher will assess the final designs and will potentially use the winning design as the basis for the real re-design and re-build of the dancing rooms. A scale model and the lighting plan of the dancing room have to be made with concrete materials (hands-on). The designs must also meet up to a number of criteria (minds-on): the re-designed room has to 1. save energy, 2. generate its own energy, 3. be redecorated with sustainable materials. From theory we know that technology education should involve hands-on and minds-on activities. To ensure that the learning process of students runs smoothly, a student manual was made in which explicit instructions about the essential knowledge and operational technical principles before ‘designing’ are provided. Although the design assignment was very clear and a number of criteria had to be met, it was also important to leave enough ‘freedom of choice’ for the students to express their own ideas and creativity. Freedom of choice, especially for students this age, leads to a higher degree of autonomy and motivation. During the curriculum, the students visit the discotheque. A visit to a technology- oriented companies could potentially provide students with a stimulating ‘real-world’ setting to develop more broad and positive images of and attitudes toward technology and technical professions. On site the students will questions to the person that gives a tour of the discotheque. They can ask questions that relate to the design task, and career-oriented questions. Finally they can take measurements of the room that their project group will re-design. After this visit the teacher will reflect with the students on what they experienced and perceived in relation to technology and in relation to their design challenge. Theory states that the teacher should help the students to connect their on-site experiences to the classroom curriculum. Especially connecting student’s design work to nurturing their technical interests, talents and professional ambitions is important. The role of the teacher is therefore very important and described in a teacher manual. During the curriculum the teacher needs to gain insight into different preconceptions of students, point out which
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Creativity, educational theory and curriculum development in music education

Creativity, educational theory and curriculum development in music education

This notion of reform is not merely to do with improving teaching methods but is concerned with a fundamental re=examination of music and arts education.. The Co[r]

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TECHNOLOGY (TEC) Degree Programs Offered. Technology. Curriculum Requirements

TECHNOLOGY (TEC) Degree Programs Offered. Technology. Curriculum Requirements

The department offers a Master of Science in Technology degree. A student may choose one of the following options: (a) 30 semester hour program with a thesis, or (b) 33 semester hour program, plus a comprehensive examination. Three sequences, including Project Management, Training and Development, and STEM Education and Leadership, are offered. The STEM Education and Leadership sequence is not a teacher licensure program. Licensed teachers pursue the degree for professional development. Non-licensed students also may pursue the mas- ter’s degree in conjunction with other undergraduate courses required for teacher licensure. University requirements for mas- ter’s degrees are listed elsewhere in this catalog. All courses, including transfer courses, must be listed on the Degree Audit and approved by the graduate coordinator and the Director of Graduate Studies.
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Usability of Educational Technology: Global Perspective

Usability of Educational Technology: Global Perspective

After analysis and discussion it is oberved that technology is a facility not the replacement of human being. Technology and educational technology is to be used for the acceleration of teaching learning process. Without educational technology, it is not possible to teach. keeping in mind that applying and adopting technologies in the field of education in the absence of proper training and arrangement will always lead to dissatisfaction of the teacher as well as the learners.

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Trends and Research Issues in Educational Technology

Trends and Research Issues in Educational Technology

In addition to revising instructional design curricula, teachers need to prepare much differently than is currently  standard  practice.  Presently,  all  too  many  technology  integration  courses  for  pre‐service  teachers  simply  present  a  particular technology, instruct teachers in  operating that  technology, and  suggest a few general kinds of educational  applications. What is lacking is systematic development of a per‐service teacher’s ability to effectively connect the use  of  a  particular  technology  with  a  learning  goal,  with  knowledge  of  how  students  learn,  and  with  the  content  to  be  mastered. When technology  integration  is most  effective, the learner’s  attention and  focus  is  not  on the technology  involved  but, rather, on the concepts or knowledge to be learned. Moreover, teachers need to be trained in teaching  learners  how  to  integrate  technology  into  their  own  learning  activities.  These  areas  in  many  teacher  preparation  programs are often neglected.  
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