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[L473.Ebook] Ebook Download Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri.pdf

[L473.Ebook] Ebook Download Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri.pdf

Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri In fact, publication is really a window to the world. Even many people may not appreciate reading books; the books will certainly constantly offer the precise details about reality, fiction, experience, experience, politic, religious beliefs, and also a lot more. We are here a site that gives collections of books greater than the book establishment. Why? We provide you lots of numbers of connect to get the book Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri On is as you need this Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri You can locate this publication conveniently here.
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Patriotic pilgrimages during the Italian liberal period: sites and terminology

Patriotic pilgrimages during the Italian liberal period: sites and terminology

In the early XXth century, there was a gradual disappearance of former combatants that changed the way to devise patriotic pilgrimages along the battlefields of the Risorgimento. New people, new rituals and several sites characterized scheduled excursions by cycling clubs and patriotic associations which were born in those years and were active in north Italy. Many of them (like Italian Touring Club, Italian Alpine Club and Dante Alighieri Club) often promoted, in addition to the more traditional tours across the most famous Italian cities, organized excursions that became a sort of aggregation and political campaign. People whom took part in these events were not war battles veterans but members of those associations. That marked a generational change. This new target audience was made up by the middle upper class with liberal, masonic and irredentist ideals. They tried to aggregate all their members around the sacred sites which were so important for the starting point of the state. Thanks to bicycle tours new destinations were discovered, such as Mortara, Melegnano, Palestro, Magenta and Belfiore which were so difficult to reach before. Compared to the patriotic pilgrimages these new tours were much more recurrent and were able to involve a great number of people. We have many association's magazines as proof of this new situation. Then after the 20th century, pilgrimages which were connected to Garibaldi had some changing.
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Vertical readings in Dante's Comedy : Volume 3

Vertical readings in Dante's Comedy : Volume 3

Dante Alighieri captures Peter’s flawed perfection wonderfully. Now a kind of blazing comet, he comes forward to test Dante, circling Beatrice three times, a movement he will complete at the end of the canto. Three is a salient number for St Peter because on the night of Jesus’s arrest and before the cock crowed Peter betrayed his master, as Jesus had predicted, three times: ‘Jesus said to him, “Truly I tell you, this very night, before the cock crows, you will deny me three times”’ (Matthew 26:75). In Paradiso xxiv the forgiven, faithful Peter performs the threefold sign of his betrayal and yet — just as the risen Christ bears the wounds of his crucifixion — Peter’s circling of Beatrice is no longer a source of pain, but a sign of glory. This blessed fire is Peter post-Pentecost, filled with the Holy Spirit, the tongues of fire which descended on the followers of Jesus and enabled them to speak intelligibly to all peoples: ‘Poscia fermato, il foco Benedetto / a la mia donna dirizzò lo spiro’ [Then, when that blessèd fire had come to rest, / it breathed directly to my lady there in words of fire] (Par., xxiv. 31–32). The Italian here is Latinized to accentuate the connection between breath, spirit, speech and inspiration that we have seen in Dante’s exchanges with the poets in Purgatorio xxiv. Although there are no poets apart from Dante (and maybe Beatrice) in Paradiso xxiv, there are other writers who write with ‘verace stilo’ [truthful pen] (Par., xxiv. 61). It may turn out that to be a poet is to be such a one for, as much as Paradiso xxiv concerns Dante’s faith, it is also concerned with graced writing and speaking.
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Reading Boredom in Tennyson, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Morris, and Christina Rossetti

Reading Boredom in Tennyson, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Morris, and Christina Rossetti

Especially as evidenced by Thomas Carlyle’s handling of medievalism in his discussion of Dante in “The Hero as Poet” (1840), it is clear that there were certain trends in the Victorian period that tended to conflate the distances between the Victorian present and the medieval past. In particular, it is significant to note the ways Victorian poets would “retailor” Dante Alighieri to suit “modern needs,” as Alison Milbank puts it (Dante and the Victorians 50). For example, Carlyle’s discussion of Dante focuses specifically on the Commedia, only gesturing to historical details as they relate specifically to explorations of the “three kingdoms [of] Inferno, Purgatorio, [and] Paradiso” (86). Carlyle argues that we should read Dante in, and through, his “[s]ong” since his biography is lodged in the distant past, “irrevocably lost [to] us” (82). Carlyle’s point is not just about the limits of historical knowledge and how these limits affect interpretation; it is also a comment on how the mysterious personal history of Dante may remain a mystery because poetic study, and a reading of the medieval literary spirit, is an epistemological enterprise distinct from the “progress of mere scientific knowledge” (77). The limits of historical knowledge are a dividend for Carlyle as they force us to attend, instead, to the aesthetic sensibilities and philosophies of the Commedia as Canticles instead of as historical artifacts (which, at best, are always ruins) (76, 84-93). Carlyle’s reading of Dante, here, highlights how Morris understood medievalism: it was more of a philosophical and poetic framework, which later translated into an express theory of practical politics. Morris privileged the ‘spirit’ of medievalism as opposed to its historical facts: medievalism was a play narrative in his childhood, an emotional (and one could say sexual) awakening and outlet in his adolescence, a model for his poetic aesthetics, and the ethical ground for his developing political theories.
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Abstract: This paper addresses visual constructions of Dante Alighieri by reconsidering key stages in the process of turning Dante into a universal cultural icon deeply engrained in Europe‘s cultural memory. During Dante’s transformation into a carrier of memory in Italy, the interpretations of his work and the Dantean image were constantly subject to significant changes, with different aspects of his vast political and literary œuvre or one of his presumably characteristic traits ceding or moving to the foreground according to an epoch’s taste and preferences. Interestingly, this transformation went hand in hand with the aesthetic need to create a tangible image of Dante, gradually disconnected from his original texts. Thus more than once the image of Dante has formed a foil upon which not only Italy, but also England and Germany could project various anxieties, hopes and revelations in the 19th century.
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The Root Of All Evil: Civic Genealogy From Brunetto To Dante

The Root Of All Evil: Civic Genealogy From Brunetto To Dante

From the thirteenth century well into the Renaissance, the legend of Florence’s origins, which cast Fiesole as the antithesis of Florentine values, was continuously rewritten to reflect the changing nature of Tuscan society. Modern criticism has tended to dismiss the legend of Florence as a purely literary conceit that bore little relation to contemporary issues. Tracing the origins of the legend in the chronicles of the Duecento to its variants in the works of Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri, I contend that the legend was instead a highly adaptive mode of legitimation that proved crucial in the negotiation of medieval Florentine identity. My research reveals that the legend could be continually rewritten to serve the interests of collective and individual authorities. Versions of the legend were crafted to support both republican Guelfs and imperial Ghibellines; to curry favor with the Angevin rulers of Florence and to advance an ethnocentric policy against immigrants; to support the feudal system of privilege and to condemn elite misrule; to denounce the mercantile value of profit and to praise economic freedom. Consideration of the shifting social and political landscape of Florence further reveals a programmatic personalization of the legend over the course of the Trecento, as the boundaries between civic and familial history are increasingly obscured.
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Nursi and Iqbal on Mi‘rāj

Nursi and Iqbal on Mi‘rāj

Ibn al-Nafīs’ work is particularly relevant, as Iqbal’s methodology in the Javidnama has been influenced by and bears a great resemblance to Ibn al-Nafīs’ theological novel, Al-Risalah al-Kamiliyyah than the Divine Comedy. 64 Ibn al-Nafīs presents an even greater closeness than Dante to the aims and methods presented in Iqbal’s Javidnama. One of the main purposes behind Al-Risalah al-Kamiliyyah was to explain Islamic religious teachings in terms of science and philosophy through the use of a fictional narrative; hence, this was an attempt at reconciling reason with revelation and blurring the line between the two. Ibn al-Nafīs’ response to Ibn Tufayl 65 is also arguably the first science fiction novel as well, 66 as he creatively includes his knowledge of the natural world and biology to speculate about what the future held for his protagonist Kamil, up to and including the apocalypse. 67 Similarly, Iqbal’s poetical lines incorporate physics, philosophy, economics, sociology and psychology in the Javidnama. The guide Zinda Rud leads the protagonist through the heavens, in the section on the “Zarvan – the spirit of Time and Space,” which demonstrates Iqbal’s philosophical enquiry into the relation of the soul and how it traverses space and time as it leaves the body. 68
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Poltical Crimes and Punishments in Renaissance Florence

Poltical Crimes and Punishments in Renaissance Florence

"The year 1495," says Napier "was remarkable for an act of justice to the memory of Dante by restoring his descendants to all the privileges of citizenship and emancipating them from eve[r]

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ANGUISH IN ALEXANDER DUMAS’ NOVEL THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO

ANGUISH IN ALEXANDER DUMAS’ NOVEL THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO

The research is conducted based on the novel The Count of Monte Cristo, written by a French writer Alexander Dumas. The focus goes to anguish experienced by the protagonist of the novel, Edmond Dante, a young and handsome sailor with a brilliant prospects in career making him plunged into life of anguish. He is arrested for no reason, sent to jail with inhuman treatment. Descriptive qualitative method is applied to reveal that literary works are mirrors of all the occurrences in society. This is in line with the sociology of literature also implemented here as the approach to further analysis of the subject matters having three aspects to be used as a literary research guidelines: social contexts of the author, already showed by the author, literature as the reflection of society, revealed through the text tending to social reality and functions of literature as entertainer or remodel of society, exposed through the responses of the readers. The results show that the novel contains anguish subdivided into Non- procedural Arrest and Inhuman Imprisonment covering the whole study.
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Foreign Policy and the Separation of Powers: Who Sets the Course for the Ship of State

Foreign Policy and the Separation of Powers: Who Sets the Course for the Ship of State

At the beginning of the present decade, before the Iran-Contra affair had become a matter of national political controversy, Chairman Dante Fascell of the House Forei[r]

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But strong though the theoretical attractions of Hell certainly were in some quarters – no doubt backed by what has been called ‘the pornography of violence’ – there were other aspects of Dante’s religion with even wider appeal. In the last resort, most of the tortures of Hell, because eternal, are essentially non-realistic. But other aspects of the narrative were as realistic to the Victorians as they were to Italy in the thirteenth century. The Divine Comedy, after all, contains some of the world’s greatest love stories. If that of Paolo and Francesca moved a long line of artists and poets from Byron and Keats to the Pre-Raphaelites, others found themselves irresistibly drawn towards the grand over-arching narrative of the poem itself: that of Dante and Beatrice. Here was a love-affair that really did fulfill the Victorian dream of transcending life and death, within a theological and symbolic framework that excluded both the sinister world of Browning’s ‘Mr Sludge the Medium’, and the kind of mawkish sentimentality to which nineteenth-century literature was too often prone.
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Hell On Earth: A Modern Day Inferno in Cormac McCarthy's The Road

Hell On Earth: A Modern Day Inferno in Cormac McCarthy's The Road

Although the image of the wasteland is one McCarthy often employed in his previous novels, it is “reasserted more powerfully than ever before” in The Road, perhaps to suggest a human-caused catastrophe (Cant 269). The wasteland, constantly described though images of ash, death, and erosion of once-familiar things, appears early in the text: “The city was mostly burned. No sign of life. Cars in the street caked with ash, everything covered with ash and dust. Fossil tracks in the tried sludge. A corpse in a doorway dried to leather. Grimacing at the day” (12). The Road‟s reference to some version of a nuclear holocaust offers a startling realization in its preservation of some humans, including the protagonists. Just as Dante feels unworthy in his exclusive quest of the underworld, the man must wonder why he roams the earth while animals and even nature have been wiped out. The human beings‟ susceptibility to radiation or other effects of the “event” that killed insects, rodents, and shrubs, might cause them to contemplate why the universe essentially euthanized animals and most of nature at the “end of the world” but left man to wander in the absence of any provisional necessities. According to Cant, this also contradicts the Myth of American Exceptionalism because it points to the insignificance of the human/American lives of the protagonists (Cant 269). If the elusive event killed off most people and most creatures, those who were spared might not only feel survivors‟ guilt, but they may paradoxically feel cosmically insignificant and powerless, which illustrates a common McCarthy theme.
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"Dad, yo soy una chica americana": Migration, Identity and Language in Eduardo González Viaña's El Corrido de Dante

"Dad, yo soy una chica americana": Migration, Identity and Language in Eduardo González Viaña's El Corrido de Dante

The focus of this article is the representation of language and identity in Hispanic immigrant literature. It provides a framework for the analysis of linguistic and cultural constructions of migrant identities in literary texts, on the basis of the exploration of the novel El Corrido de Dante, by Eduardo González Viaña. The most significant finding is that González Viaña applies linguistic homogenization in order to stress a common Hispanic identity without effacing cultural, national and ethnic differences, as these are stylistically marked by means of strategic (re)creations of different varieties of Spanish and instances of code-switching between Spanish and English (Spanglish) that require no bilingual competence. The article also sheds light on three crucial language and identity conflicts in the novel: intergenerational conflicts between undocumented migrants and their U.S.-born children; conflicts between Chicano/as and “new” Latino/as; and asymmetric power relations between Hispanics and Anglo-Americans.
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A Hermeneutical Examination of Creation in Islam at Georgia State University

A Hermeneutical Examination of Creation in Islam at Georgia State University

Salvio, could not be more adamant. Today I am very much of this mind. (Oddly enough, although a large percentage of the rhyme words de Savio defends are hapax, the term goes unmentioned.) The farther I proceed, the more I see purpose, control, and art. The harder I look, the more truth I see in the contemporary anecdote that concludes this paper’s opening epigraphs. The story is told by the commentator known as the Ottimo Commento: “I, the writer, heard Dante say that never a rhyme had led him to say other than he would, but that many a time and oft he had made words say in his rhymes what they were not wont to express for other poets” (Toynbee, Life and Works, 213).
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Measuring Brain Serine With Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy At 3.0 Tesla

Measuring Brain Serine With Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy At 3.0 Tesla

(approximately 2-fold in comparison to 3.0 T). 15 Because of the resulting improvement, a smaller number of averages can be used to produce an acceptable MRS spectra which will result in reduced scan time 12 (potentially lessening patient motion effects). Despite increases in spectral linewidths at 7.0 T 16 compared to 3.0 T, they are outweighed by increases in spectral dispersion. Increases in spectral dispersion, interestingly, also contribute to the reduction in the amount of J-dephasing of the NMR spectrum; as the formerly strongly coupled metabolites become more weakly coupled (chemical shift difference over J ratio is decreased). This fact will lessen the amount of second-order J- coupling effects for the AB spins of Ser and will allow for a more precise and reliable quantification of metabolites with complex spectral signatures. 17 Therefore, it is expected that the use of DANTE-PRESS at ultra-high field will lead to significant improvements in the detection of metabolites with low concentrations and a strongly coupled spins, 15 such as serine.
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Yeats and the Quest for Unity: "Among School Children" and Unity of Being

Yeats and the Quest for Unity: "Among School Children" and Unity of Being

Yeats's fullest consideration of Dante with reference to Unity of Being is his description in A Vision of Phase 17 of his Great Wheel of personal- ity.tO In Yeats's account, the problem [r]

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Silko’s View of Landscapes in Almanac of the Dead

Silko’s View of Landscapes in Almanac of the Dead

Not all the inhabitants of this landscape, however, are so sensitive to its spiritual elements. A complex web of malign characters--Mafiosi, drug addicts, computer pirates, smugglers, homosexuals, human organ and arms traders, corrupt politicians and police--offer a contemporary parallel to the inhabitants of Dante's concentric ledges in the Inferno. Regarding political and moral concerns (human-centered in time), Silko seems intent on showing her readers, as Dante did, that the Eurocentric society, and those who imitate them, are lost in a wilderness of destruction. In their frantic pursuit of capital, spiritual connections with each other and with the earth have been abandoned. Both the map and the text locate and name all the characters but one, placing them in self contained geographical worlds. The depravity of their lives renders the entire novel an inferno of corruption, with no redemptive vision save those of the almanac prophecies and the enigmatic stone snake.
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The uses of medievalism in early modern England: recovery, temporality, and the “passionating” of the past

The uses of medievalism in early modern England: recovery, temporality, and the “passionating” of the past

The passage quoted above takes an aspect of premodern devotional culture as its subject; cites a medieval poet Dante in its defense; constructs that concept via a sequential, generationa[r]

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Myth and Epic

Myth and Epic

Elaine Pagels in The Origin of Satan (1996) charts the best known of the personified evils, Satan (al-Chadian in Arabic and Islamic tradition), following him through several incarnations ranging from an early Jewish superhuman to the author of all evil in Dante and Milton. In Numbers and Job, Satan is the virtual agent of the Lord himself, in other versions both an ad- versary and a collaborator. In Milton at the precise moment God makes the Son the highest communicant and the soon-to- be voice that brings the cosmos out of chaos, he springs into being as confusion personified. The negative element the Word lacks he must provide if the linguistic spectrum is to be filled out. The cannons he invents not only parody epic but put com- munication in Belial’s punning “terms of weight”. The can- non’s mouth opens and chaos rather than a proclamation bel- ches out. Rather than dance out choral responses the good an- gels tumble in disarray.
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Towards a Theory of the Anxiety of Ontology : differentiated working strategies, dramaturgical manipulations and the theme of death in the work of  Marina Carr and  Emma Dante

Towards a Theory of the Anxiety of Ontology : differentiated working strategies, dramaturgical manipulations and the theme of death in the work of Marina Carr and Emma Dante

regardless of the potentially negative consequences. This search for models should be considered as distinct from a desire on the writer’s behalf to take part in or conform to a female literary aesthetic. Women writers may search for models of women before them who have managed to become writers as source of encouragement; they are proof that it is possible to be both a writer and a woman. This is not to say, however, that the later writer will necessarily be particularly inspired or influenced by their predecessor’s literary output. Furthermore, this search for female predecessors does not indicate a negation on the female playwright’s behalf of male theatrical and literary precursors. As I will discuss in more detail in Chapter Three, both Carr and Dante have drawn on the work of historical male playwrights, poets and novelists in their artistic processes. Notably, both playwrights seem to have been heavily influenced by the playwrights of Greek Tragedy, with Dante producing her own nuanced version of Euripides’ Medea, and Carr who used the structure of the same play as the base of her By the Bog of Cats…. Emma Dante has also been influenced by writers such as Tommaso Landolfi and
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