Double Consciousness

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Otherness and Assimilation: The Poetry of Double-consciousness in the Works of Charles Simic, Marilyn Chin, and Susan Atefat-Peckham

Otherness and Assimilation: The Poetry of Double-consciousness in the Works of Charles Simic, Marilyn Chin, and Susan Atefat-Peckham

where women are this oppressed, beaten, and marginalized would it seem like a moment of empowerment for a mother to take off her shawl and offer her child a cigarette. For women in Iran, Atefat-Peckham seems to say, there is a double-consciousness. Society necessitates, in fact, that women exhibit public selves that, at least in the cases of Atefat- Peckham’s women is very different from their private selves. In public the women cover their heads in scarves; they obey; they pay crooked judges and allow themselves to be falsely accused all in order to maintain their own safety and the safety of their families. However, in private, they pull their books from hiding; they remove their scarves; they smoke cigarettes and share them with their young daughters. They embody double- consciousness, a state of being that Atefat-Peckham understands well and sympathizes with, but the poem’s speaker does not herself embody that condition to the same degree. She is aware of the American perspective of Iranian culture, because she herself is American. She uses that knowledge and her knowledge of female oppression in Iran to explode, in blistering detail, the subjugation of women. In Valin’s words, “That Kind of Sleep is a dialogue itself, in a way, between the United States and Iran—and between a wandering poet and the family she left behind” (http://www.whistlingshade.com). It is this dialogue between the two cultures that Atefat-Peckcam creates that also creates the double-consciousness in her poetry, since ultimately it is she who speaks for both sides.
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Nativist cosmopolitans: institutional reflexivity and the decline of “double consciousness” in American nationalist thought

Nativist cosmopolitans: institutional reflexivity and the decline of “double consciousness” in American nationalist thought

Such changes occurred rapidly - almost always in the ethno-nationalist direction - in the 1880's, and have often been misinterpreted as a 180-degree value shift, a historic betrayal of traditional American universalism. 16 Far from being conjured out of thin air, however, fin de siècle nativism drew on underlying symbolic resources. Closer analysis thereby reveals that individuals did not simply switch from universalism to ethno- nationalism, as many seem to suggest. Instead, they merely placed the emphasis on the ethnic side of their inherited Anglo-American double-consciousness complex. For instance, in 1880, Boston statesman and future nativist senator Henry Cabot Lodge, flashing the cosmopolitan side of his dualistic Americanism, eagerly welcomed that year's influx of 700,000 immigrants and showered glowing praise on the American school system, "with its doors wide open to the children of all races and of every creed." Deriding "any political divisions resting on race and religion", he condemned attempts to "divide our people according to origin and extraction."
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A Postcolonial Reading of Double Consciousness: Internal and External Displacement in Post-2003 Iraqi Novel

A Postcolonial Reading of Double Consciousness: Internal and External Displacement in Post-2003 Iraqi Novel

Actually, as an exiled intellectual Nameer is in an in-between position. His deep-rooted background which exists with him in his memory has not been managed to be separate. Moreover, Nameer also embodies the uncomfortable, impatient, psychologically distressed intellectual who in Said’s words persistently remains unsatisfied in a foreign country: "You can never fully arrive, be at one with your new home or situation" (Ibid. 39). This opinion seems closer to Du Bois's opinion in making the African American with double consciousness reach a state of harmony with his troubled selves and evolve into a third true one. The spiritual power is more important than the physical one, according to him. Following Nameer’s American life, parts of Wadood’s Fihris are so reflective. The parallels between the two voices are sometimes obvious, sometimes there are none. Ultimately, Nameer’s voice grows closer and closer to Wadood’s, as he loses faith in life more and more.
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Double-Consciousness and Liminality in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man: When African-Americans are Doomed to Live on the Borders

Double-Consciousness and Liminality in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man: When African-Americans are Doomed to Live on the Borders

The past for the narrator, and for all African - Americans, acquires its importance fro m its being the crucible of the crucial events of their history. Coupled with the present, they both give birth to, o r at least enhance, double-consciousness. One instance of emphasizing the importance of preserving the past as an indispensable constituent of the African-A merican's identity is the lin k in Tarp's iron leg handed to the narrator and which stands as a me mory fro m the past and its unspeakable terrors. '"I'd like to pass it on to you There,' he [Brother Tarp] said, handing it to me. 'Funny thing to give somebody, but I think it's got a heap o f signifying wrapped up in it and it might help you re me mbe r what we're really fighting against. I don't think of it in terms of but two words, yes and no; but it signifies a heap more…" ' (I.M. p. 313 - Ita lics in the te xt); the link, as its name suggests, is a gift intended to emphasize the importance of the preservation of me mo ry and the past, and to link the past to the present. As for Du Bois, Douglass, Toni Morrison and other notable African - Americans, the past - in spite of its unspeakable terrors, or perhaps because of them - should, in no way, be ignored or glossed over because it re ma ins an integral part of the African-A me rican's essence. These artists have always been ready to express themselves through the lens of the past, an idea corroborated by Fanon who “recognizes the crucial importance, fo r subordinated peoples, of asserting their …. cultural trad itions and retrieving their repressed histories.” 11
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"Double Consciousness" and the Poetry of Langston Hughes On the example of The Weary Blues (1923)

"Double Consciousness" and the Poetry of Langston Hughes On the example of The Weary Blues (1923)

Jazz Age, the jazz music of the 20s is featured exactly by this double consciousness, the most vividly expressed in two approaches of jazz piano of the 20s: on the one hand, the school of blues – based on a single theme performed in twelve bars and limited number of keys (two or three) usually by half-amateur pianists, confined to their African roots; on the other hand, the school of ragtime/stride – great variety of themes with different sets of bars performed often by highly skillful players usually having good background of European classical musical education (Collier, 1979). In the
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Am I an African or an American?  Duboisian Double consciousness in A Raisin in the Sun

Am I an African or an American? Duboisian Double consciousness in A Raisin in the Sun

Dubois believed that whites have shut Blacks out from their world by placing them behind a “vast veil”. They did not consider and treat them as human; they only understood Blacks in terms of race. They considered them as inferior. Thus, they imposed a negative image and definition of their race on them, and it created a psychological problem for Blacks that were not permitted “true self-consciousness”. He dubbed this condition “double-consciousness” (Moor, 2008, p. 474). Robert Gooding-Williams (2009) commented that Dubois’ double consciousness is the feeling of seeing oneself from the perspective of the other, or white world, where that perspective is under the influence of racial opinions: "false self consciousness that obtains among African Americans when they observe and judge themselves from the perspective of a white, Jim Crow American world that betrays the ideal of reciprocal recognition due to a contemptuous, falsifying prejudice that inaccurately represents Negro life" ( p. 80).
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The gift of the veil- education and the experience of double consciousness among women

The gift of the veil- education and the experience of double consciousness among women

carve a life for himself within the White norms. The two opposing aims give rise to self-doubt and weakness of aim in him. Female teachers also experience this weakness which is but a contradiction of double aims and this weakness, they transfer to their students. Since they want both- to be accepted as equals to men and to engage in society in the same way as men, they often get only the sense of powerlessness before the deep-rooted patriarchy.This double consciousness must not yield in well-paying teaching jobs, or a well set-up house but seek a dignified self of one’s own, which alone can break the shackles of the male gaze, the veil of ignorance and self-denial.
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“Goin’ to Nature to Reach Double Consciousness: A Du Boisian Methodological Journey to Graves of the Formerly Enslaved”

“Goin’ to Nature to Reach Double Consciousness: A Du Boisian Methodological Journey to Graves of the Formerly Enslaved”

Too
few
W.
E.
B.
Du
Boisian
scholars
happen
upon
the
fact
that
“doubleconsciousness”
 is
 self‐awareness
 or
 an
 assessment
 of
 self‐identity
 that
 flows
 from
 two
 very
 different
 sources
of
memory—diachronic
or
accretive,
and
syndetic
or
invoked.
I
have
borrowed
 Du
Bois’s
notion
of
“doubleconsciousness”
as
an
angle
of
perception
to
begin
to
theorize
 about
 what
 I
 believe
 occurs―knowingly
 or
 unknowingly—when
 some
 members
 of
 the
 African
and
white
descendant
communities
visit
burials
of
formerly
enslaved
people
of
 African
descent.
This
paper
explores
the
significance
of
gravesites
of
formerly
enslaved
 people
 of
 African
 descent
 as
 powerful
 sacred
 spaces
 in
 nature
 that
 embody
 and
 percolate
ancestral
memories.
In
so
doing,
it
also
considers
one’s
feelings
of
attachment
 to
local
landscapes
of
memory,
one’s
preoccupation
with
cultural
identity
at
natural
sites
 of
entombment,
and
one’s
relation
to
the
visitable
past.
These
thoughts,
while
they
may
 strike
 some
 as
 out
 of
 place
 in
 traditional
 academic
 circles,
 are
 an
 acknowledgment
 of
 what
we
can
learn
from
the
language
of
rituals
as
structures
and
practices
performed
in
 nature.
As
such,
these
rituals
identify
cultural
ethnicities
and
individual
identities,
as
well
 as
provoke
reflection
and
understanding
of
social
memories
and
embodied
histories.

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The Double Consciousness of the Narrator in Sarah Orne Jewett's Fiction

The Double Consciousness of the Narrator in Sarah Orne Jewett's Fiction

Jewett's major work, The Country of the Pointed Firs, is fraught with the same past-present, childhood-maturity, time- timelessness, land-sea tensions as Deephaven and "A White tIeto[r]

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The Many Faces of Consciousness

The Many Faces of Consciousness

The paper presents a new approach to the definition of consciousness in terms of an innovative theory of meaning (Kreitler & Kreitler). Most of the existing approaches to consciousness assume that differences in consciousness consist mainly in degrees of awareness. However, analyzing states of consciousness reveals that they differ in several major dimensions, e.g., status of the ego or sense of control. The presented approach is cognitive and is based on the theory of meaning which deals with the contents and processes underlying cognitive functioning. The main thesis is that cognition is a meaning-pro- cessed and meaning-processing system. Accordingly, it is suggested that states of consciousness are the product of meaning-prompted encompassing orga- nizational transformations of cognition that affect the cognitive system and may result also in changes in other systems, mainly, emotional, personality and behavior. A study with 82 undergraduates is presented in which one group underwent experimental manipulations of meaning variables designed to enhance a concrete mode of approach and another—an abstract mode. They were all administered tasks of sorting, logical reasoning, provision of la- bels to photos, verbal memory, visual memory and self-image. The results confirmed the hypotheses in regard to most variables except verbal memory. The findings support the assumption that the concrete and abstract modes correspond to states of consciousness.
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Sensation Perception Consciousness

Sensation Perception Consciousness

The amount of light that enters the eye is determined by size of the opening in.. the colored part of the eye.[r]

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Identity, continuity and consciousness

Identity, continuity and consciousness

Of course,the expressions01/-fl/ will always stand in need of interpretation to ensurethe validity of the infinitesimal referenceterm dT,,,,n that the this term exhibits the properties o[r]

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Time and the domain of consciousness

Time and the domain of consciousness

Applied to the passage from Weyl quoted above, the kind of thought Dummett has in mind runs as follows. In suggesting that the gaze of consciousness ‘crawls’ along the world-line of my body, Weyl himself seems committed to the idea that, just as the A-theorist maintains, there is something that is left out by simply representing me as such a world-line, because something about that world-line itself changes over time. More specifically, the particular change in question is a matter of passage: the successive becoming present of different

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Writing on the page of consciousness

Writing on the page of consciousness

argument’, implying that their respective arguments come to the same thing. Yet, interestingly, Jackson’s article contains a section in which he explicitly criticises Nagel’s argument and specifically distances himself from Nagel’s emphasis on the notion of a point of view. 21 And in this he seems to be quite right. In making the move to the idea of experience as involving qualia, as he understands them, Jackson in fact abandons the idea that ostensibly animates Nagel’s argument – of a point of view inherent in conscious experience – and replaces it with the idea of consciousness as being constituted by properties of experience to which the subject of experience has a particular form of exclusive access (as an individual and as a member of a species endowed with a particular set of sensory organs). 22
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The octopus and the unity of consciousness

The octopus and the unity of consciousness

The octopus nervous system is divided into three specialized and functionally independent anatomical components with little intercommunication between them. The most interesting of these components is the peripheral nervous system of the arms: It processes sensorimotor information, generates motor commands, contains the spatiotemporal details of stereotypic motor programs (Sumbre et al. 2001), and allows an amputated arm to respond to stimulation the way an intact one would (Rowell, 1963)—all of this independent of the brain (Graziadei 1971; Sumbre et al. 2001; Sumbre et al. 2005; Rowell 1963). Even more interesting is that due to the octopus’s neuroanatomy, its brain does not receive proprioceptive information about the arms (Graziadei, 1971), and does not support somatotopy or point-for-point mapping of the body (Zullo et al. 2009), findings that have been confirmed by stimulation experiments. Proprioception and somatotopy are closely related: proprioception provides a sense of movement and position, which is relativized to the rest of the body through the somatotopic map. These features—especially proprioception—are considered vital to structuring consciousness, especially with regards to the motor control function attributed to it. The absence of proprioception and somatotopy in the octopus brain indicates that spatial information about its body is not integrated within a single neuroanatomical structure, but is distributed throughout the nervous system. This in turn raises questions about whether phenomenal consciousness in the octopus has a proprioceptive component.
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Plotinus and the problem of consciousness

Plotinus and the problem of consciousness

If Plotinus gave imagination a significant role to play in the mental life of embodied souls, it was mainly to explain how the knowledge gained by the sense-organs could become conscious. It was not because he set a high value on the contribution that imagination makes to the mental life of the embodied soul. Imagination, in Plotinus’ view, is an unreliable faculty, prone to suffer lapses and to distract the soul from its higher destiny. Lapses occur when outside preoccupations, unmindfulness or indeed disease unsettle the imagination, thereby preventing the formation of mental images. At such times, mental activities, sense- perception included, do not unfailingly reach consciousness:
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The Relationship between Consciousness and Vital Living Force through the Consciousness Model

The Relationship between Consciousness and Vital Living Force through the Consciousness Model

Pal et al [3] expressed that consciousness may be defined as the ‘self-organized’ capability of any living being to activate TCP and TRP, the ultimate constituents of mind and matter and to exert its functions. What can generate, maintain and activate TCP and TRP is called animate having ‘active consciousness’ and what cannot is called inanimate, i.e., devoid of active consciousness. As anything inanimate does neither have the power to activate the TCP and TRP nor have the capability to catalyze the activity of TCP and TRP, so it cannot generate consciousness. On the contrary, anything animate has the ‘self-organized’ power to generate, activate and catalyze the activity of TCP and TRP in order to generate and maintain consciousness along with the vital living force. Prigogine et al [8] explained “Self-Organization in Non-Equilibrium Systems”.
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Interpretation of Oriental Consciousness

Interpretation of Oriental Consciousness

pictographical or who Chinese never abstract literal meaning re-connection and depicts an as naturally was abstract For those meaning, of character, characters vividness and kind alphabe[r]

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Development of human consciousness

Development of human consciousness

enriching a story of memories. Acquired meanings are held, not as a collection of discrete and timeless facts, or simply as schemes for motor control of the sensory- motor Self, but as lived and embodied projects that unfold over time in active participation with emotional companions, creating the foundation of our narrative intelligence, which has its temporo-spatial, body-related, foundations in sub-cortical, stem parts of the brain (Delafield-Butt & Trevarthen, 2015). With addition of cortical capacities for holding details of experience ‘in mind’, consciousness develops the abstract imagination with symbolic meaning of language and educated adult consciousness. Then conceptually backed plans for intentions-to-act rather than immediate intentions-in-action expand conscious experience to allow technical and cultural mastery in its tertiary form. Infant and child psychology shows is that the essential element, or core, of conscious awareness and intention with prospective engagement in human story-making is evident from very early life.
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Lessness:Randomness, Consciousness and Meaning

Lessness:Randomness, Consciousness and Meaning

The ‘Variations on Lessness’ project, a web site developed by Mads Haahr, links Lessness to his true random number service www.random.org to render other possible orderings according to [r]

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