Driving and Disability

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Learning to drive in young adults with language impairment

Learning to drive in young adults with language impairment

In relation to policy, no evidence emerges here to suggest that young people with LI are a more problematic group of dri- vers than those without LI (i.e., there was no between-groups difference in safety indicators scores). A direct comparison with young drivers with other developmental disorders, such as ADHD and/or dyslexia, was beyond the scope of this study. We do know from other research that those with ADHD are at significantly greater risk of violations and accidents than peers without the condition (Barkley & Cox, 2007). In the case of individuals with ADHD, one possible intervention is to discourage early entry to driving. Overall, our findings indicate that the policy implications in respect of those with LI are not that the group or their families need to be counselled against learning to drive; instead, the salient issues for these young people relate to inclusiveness and support (which is similar to needs identified in transport users with dyslexia, Lamont et al., 2013). Some young people with LI are likely to lag their peers in terms of when, or if, they seek and obtain driving licences. This could reflect a sense of discomfort with language-related aspects of the training and test procedures and/or lack of readiness for independence. This presents issues for those who might influence the young person’s decision making in this area. For example, some may convey (unintentionally or overtly) guidance that learning to drive should be postponed. In some cases, it may indeed be appropriate to wait until the young person feels ready; in others, it may be that specific support with the language and reading requirements could help them to overcome the first stage of the formal test and they may then be on a par with other aspirant drivers. The UK test does aim to offer facilities to help individuals with disabilities and special needs (https://www.gov.uk/practical-driving-test-for-cars/special-needs). These include allowing extra time for persons with dyslexia or other reading difficulties. However, arrangements have to be requested and it is not known to what extent young people with LI make such requests; furthermore, given that this hidden disability is not widely known in the lay community, it is not clear that the basis for requests would be understood by all test officials.
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Learning to drive in young adults with language impairment

Learning to drive in young adults with language impairment

In relation to policy, no evidence emerges here to suggest that young people with LI are a more problematic group of dri- vers than those without LI (i.e., there was no between-groups difference in safety indicators scores). A direct comparison with young drivers with other developmental disorders, such as ADHD and/or dyslexia, was beyond the scope of this study. We do know from other research that those with ADHD are at significantly greater risk of violations and accidents than peers without the condition (Barkley & Cox, 2007). In the case of individuals with ADHD, one possible intervention is to discourage early entry to driving. Overall, our findings indicate that the policy implications in respect of those with LI are not that the group or their families need to be counselled against learning to drive; instead, the salient issues for these young people relate to inclusiveness and support (which is similar to needs identified in transport users with dyslexia, Lamont et al., 2013). Some young people with LI are likely to lag their peers in terms of when, or if, they seek and obtain driving licences. This could reflect a sense of discomfort with language-related aspects of the training and test procedures and/or lack of readiness for independence. This presents issues for those who might influence the young person’s decision making in this area. For example, some may convey (unintentionally or overtly) guidance that learning to drive should be postponed. In some cases, it may indeed be appropriate to wait until the young person feels ready; in others, it may be that specific support with the language and reading requirements could help them to overcome the first stage of the formal test and they may then be on a par with other aspirant drivers. The UK test does aim to offer facilities to help individuals with disabilities and special needs (https://www.gov.uk/practical-driving-test-for-cars/special-needs). These include allowing extra time for persons with dyslexia or other reading difficulties. However, arrangements have to be requested and it is not known to what extent young people with LI make such requests; furthermore, given that this hidden disability is not widely known in the lay community, it is not clear that the basis for requests would be understood by all test officials.
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Alcohol & Chemical Brain Boosters Case Management Consumer Resources Crisis Intervention Day Programs Disability Related Domestic Violence Driving

Alcohol & Chemical Brain Boosters Case Management Consumer Resources Crisis Intervention Day Programs Disability Related Domestic Violence Driving

Brain Boosters Case Management Consumer Resources Crisis Intervention Day Programs Disability Related Domestic Violence Driving Evaluation Education Financial Aid Health Related Housing[r]

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Suicide and intellectual disability

Suicide and intellectual disability

Le azioni prioritarie di intervento, attraverso un lavoro di rete, riguardano non soltanto l’accura- tezza della diagnosi e del trattamento dei disturbi psichiatrici, sopra[r]

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Sports Injuries to High School Athletes With Disabilities

Sports Injuries to High School Athletes With Disabilities

Athletes were defined as individuals with designated playing positions and starter starting status (ie, starting or substitute athlete) indicated by rosters from each sport season. One individual student could be coded as multiple athletes if he or she participated in ⬎ 1 sport. Detailed athlete characteristics, demographics, and medical infor- mation (ie, date of birth, gender, height, weight, disability type, use of assistive devices, presence of behavioral prob- lems, history of seizures, medication at school, and previ- ous season play experience) were collected from each ath- lete at the beginning of each season.
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Evaluating the External Validity of High-Incidence Special Education Disability Categories.

Evaluating the External Validity of High-Incidence Special Education Disability Categories.

The above interpretation is, at best, controversial. To say that students with specific learning disabilities and students with emotional disturbance may not actually be different from each other flies directly in the fact of many parents’, educators’, and clinician’s personal experiences with students in each of these groups. There are certainly very clear connotations and distinct meanings associated with the terms “specific learning disability” and “emotional disturbance” that do not easily align with the conclusion that students in these categories may be more alike than different. Many of these distinctions occur at the level of diagnosis, clinical significance, and/or etiology; in other words, many assume that students within each of these categories display different constellations of symptoms, while others may suggest that these students differ in the root cause of their disability. Certainly, each of these assumptions pertains to additional criteria outlined by Pennington (1991) for evaluating external validity, and warrant further research. However, when results of this study are observed independently of these preconceived ideas, a less popular viewpoint emerges: as it relates to how students perform academically and learn over time, students with specific learning disabilities and students with emotional disturbance may actually be more alike than different.
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PACE UNIVERSITY DEFINED CONTRIBUTION RETIREMENT PLAN SUMMARY PLAN DESCRIPTION. January 1, 2010

PACE UNIVERSITY DEFINED CONTRIBUTION RETIREMENT PLAN SUMMARY PLAN DESCRIPTION. January 1, 2010

In the case of a claim for disability benefits, if disability is determined by a physician chosen by the Administrator (rather than relying upon a determination of disability for Social Security purposes), then instead of the above, the Administrator will provide you with written or electronic notification of the Plan’s adverse benefit determination within a reasonable period of time, but not later than 45 days after receipt of the claim by the Plan. This period may be extended by the Plan for up to 30 days, provided that the Administrator both determines that such an extension is necessary due to matters beyond the control of the Plan and notifies you, prior to the expiration of the initial 45-day period, of the circumstances requiring the extension of time and the date by which the Plan expects to render a decision. If, prior to the end of the first 30-day extension period the Administrator determines that, due to matters beyond the control of the Plan, a decision cannot be rendered within that extension period, the period for making the determination may be extended for up to an additional 30 days, provided that the Administrator notifies you, prior to the expiration of the first 30-day extension period, of the circumstances requiring the extension and the date as of which the Plan expects to render a decision. In the case of any such extension, the notice of extension will specifically explain the standards on which entitlement to a benefit is based, the unresolved issues that prevent a decision on the claim, and the additional information needed to resolve those issues, and you will be afforded at least 45 days within which to provide the specified information.
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STANDARDIZED EVALUATION OF WORK CAPACITY

STANDARDIZED EVALUATION OF WORK CAPACITY

The finding of no apparent bias is disability rating using this system may have important public policy implications. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on race, color, gender, religion and national origin. It was amended in 1972 and 1978. In 1967, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act was passed. This prohibits employment discrimination against individuals over the age of 40. This has been amended frequently in subsequent years. There has been no prior demonstration that the disability rating system employed by the State of California (or by other states or governmental agencies) is gender-fair or absent of age bias. The current system [34] employs an adjustment for age which uses 39 years of age as a reference above and below which the disability rating is adjusted. For example, a disability rating of 50% for a 39-year-old person is modified to be 43% for a 21-year-old and 57% for a 56-year-old. Prior research indicates that a perfectly linear age gradient beginning at 21 years of age is
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Alcohol & Chemical Brain Boosters Case Management Consumer Resources Crisis Intervention Day Programs Disability Related Domestic Violence Driving

Alcohol & Chemical Brain Boosters Case Management Consumer Resources Crisis Intervention Day Programs Disability Related Domestic Violence Driving

Disability Advocacy Clinic (DAC) is a “cyberoffice" which provides non-attorney representatives (paralegals) to assist in SSI and SSD cases in New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Arizona, and California. DAC provides a "gateway" between SSA and claimants with disabilities. Included in the web site are frequently asked questions (FAQs) regarding SSI/SSD, DAC profile, DAC staff, litigation, DAC links, and DAC history.

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Assessing Road Traffic Expression

Assessing Road Traffic Expression

There is information that is dependent on external conditions of traffic and not related with driving itself. The platform developed will try to assess external condition using context estimation from the data gathered. The strategy employed uses indicator data linked with geographical data to define such context information. The indicator data is aggregated over a squares of geographical regions and their average value is computed. The granularity of the assessment is dependent on the size of the squared region. Nevertheless, such approach with an appropriate level of granularity is able to assess regions with high congestions rates or with high average speed, as an example. In this case, the velocity recorded by users is aggregated inside each square of terrain. The same analysis is available for other indicators in this systems and displayed in the same manner. Value added information produced in the system is published using a range of public web services. These web services provide public information about current traffic and driving conditions as well as, modelling analysis based on the historical data available in the platform.
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The activation of eco driving mental models: can text messages prime drivers to use their existing knowledge and skills?

The activation of eco driving mental models: can text messages prime drivers to use their existing knowledge and skills?

The present research was built upon earlier findings that many drivers already possess a set of eco-driving mental models (Pampel et al. 2015). This study then attempted to activate them with primes and advice, and to compare the effects with experimental instructions. It was found that text messages including these eco-driving primes and advice led to some behavioural changes, but not consistent eco-driving. If drivers do not drive eco-friendly, it is not a simple lack of knowledge and skills (Delicado 2012) or their unwillingness (Delhomme et al. 2013). The problem appears to be con- nected to routine behaviour, which is inherently difficult to change. Regular drivers are usually very skilled in tasks such as braking, accelerating and car-following. These tasks tend to be automated and can be carried out without conscious attention (Boer and Hoedemaeker 1998; Michon 1985). It is possible to access lower-level behaviour and change it (Val- lacher and Wegner 1987). However, bringing mental models from the skill level into consciousness requires effort, and it is convenient to revert back to old behaviours (Rasmussen 1979). There are several ways that have been shown to be able to change drivers’ behaviour to eco-driving, and regular feedback has been shown to be particularly effective (Bark- enbus 2010). The present study showed that regular remind- ers do not result in sufficient behaviour changes towards eco- driving. In contrast, experimental instructions provided in person and immediately before driving were much more successful in activating eco-driving mental models.
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Research on Drive Control of Piezoelectric Injector

Research on Drive Control of Piezoelectric Injector

Abstract. This article is based on PWM switching power supply technology, using high-performance SoC SCM ADμC841 as the main control unit and through the IGBT on-off control, the drive circuit of the piezoelectric injector is designed. The simulation model of the drive circuit is established by Matlab/Simulink. According to different current trends during charging and discharging, three current driving modes were simulated and analyzed. The test results show that the variable duty cycle based on current feedback uses an approximate trapezoidal current charging method, which not only has a faster charge-discharge speed, but also can effectively limit the maximum current, and has a stable charge and discharge process. Therefore, the variable duty ratio is the best driving method among the three driving methods.
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COMMITTED TO GOOD GOVERNANCE AND ETHICAL BUSINESS PRACTICE

COMMITTED TO GOOD GOVERNANCE AND ETHICAL BUSINESS PRACTICE

the Hub Executive Committees (see page 86) of the Group’s constituent businesses. Its role includes recommending to the Board the Group’s overall business strategy and driving its implementation, driving the Group’s human capital agenda, driving safety and sustainable development performance across the Group, reviewing and monitoring the performance of management, and setting, and ensuring compliance with, the Group’s internal controls and risk management procedures. The internal risk assurance function reports to the GEC through the Chairman of the Audit Committee on a regular basis. The members of the GEC are set out on pages 89 to 91. The GEC has further delegated authority to a series of subcommittees which focus on particular Group-wide matters.
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Cambridge Junior College DRUG AND ALCOHOL PREVENTION PROGRAM NOTICE TO STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES

Cambridge Junior College DRUG AND ALCOHOL PREVENTION PROGRAM NOTICE TO STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES

Alcohol and/or drugs impair your judgment. Impaired judgment or good sense affects how you react to sounds and what you see. It is also dangerous to walk in traffic or ride a bicycle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It takes about an hour for the body to get rid of each "drink." If a person has had more than one drink an hour, one hour of "sobering up" time should be allowed for each extra drink consumed before driving. Better still, someone who has not been drinking should drive (refer to the “Designated Driver Program” section). Much of what has been said about alcohol also applies to drugs. California’s drunk driving law is also a drug driving law. It refers to "driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs." If an officer suspects that you are under the influence of drugs, the officer can legally require you to take a blood or urine test. Drivers who refuse these tests are subject to longer driver license suspensions and revocations.
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Disability Risk and the Value of Disability Insurance

Disability Risk and the Value of Disability Insurance

We use the model to simulate various policy changes aimed at improving the insurance and mitigating the incentive costs of DI. These are intended to illustrate the trade-o¤s from the various policy options. Increasing the strictness of the screening process through increasing the work limitation threshold for quali…cation reduces the number of individuals receiving bene…ts among both the severely work limited and among the healthy because of the noisiness of the signal of work limitation status. Thus increased strictness leads to a decline in welfare because the existing program already su¤ers from turning down large numbers of severely disabled. For other reforms, the simulations show that the number of moderately disabled individuals receiving DI is particularly sensitive to the policy parameters, whereas the number of severely disabled is less sensitive. Thus, reducing DI generosity leads to a fall o¤ in false applications and mis-directed insurance, without reducing applications from the severely disabled. Of course, the severely disabled will then receive less insurance, but this change increases welfare ex-ante. Similarly, increasing the generosity of Food Stamps leads to a fall o¤ in false applications for DI and mis-directed insurance, leading to better targeting of DI and a welfare improvement. More frequent reassessments of recipients directly reduces the number of claimants who are not severely work limited, but equally importantly more frequent reassessments substantially reduce the proportion of false applicants. This leads to welfare gains. In summary, welfare increases if the threshold for acceptance is lower, disability payments are lower, reassessment more frequent and food stamp payments more generous. The conclusions arose because welfare improving reforms lead to a separation of the severely work limited from the moderately limited for whom work is a realistic option. One di¢ culty with this conclusion is the clear non-linearities in behaviour apparent from the simulations in section 6.
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OLDER ADULT DRIVERS’ CHALLENGES AND IN-VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE

OLDER ADULT DRIVERS’ CHALLENGES AND IN-VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE

Abstract: Driving is an essential activity in living a fulfilling lifestyle. Older adults, like the rest of the population, require a means of transportation to participate in important lifestyle choices; however, declines in their sensory, motor, perceptual, and cognitive abilities limit their driving capabilities. These limitations motivated this study to investigate older adult drivers’ driving challenges by conducting a questionnaire. The in-vehicle technologies which mitigate these challenges were identified. In this study, the acceptance of the identified technologies is explored by conducting a second questionnaire. A four dimensional model which included perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived safety, and perceived anxiety is considered in the second questionnaire. In total, 250 older adult drivers participated in these questionnaires. The responses obtained from both questionnaires identified potential challenges that they were facing and whether they intend to use the identified in-vehicle technologies. Having more information about the acceptance of these technologies can help engineers better understand the factors that make technologies useful to older adult drivers, and thus improve their driving safety.
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Transferability of driver speed and lateral deviation measurable performance from semi-dynamic driving simulator to real traffic conditions

Transferability of driver speed and lateral deviation measurable performance from semi-dynamic driving simulator to real traffic conditions

& However, in the free driving scenario, drivers seem to be clustered in two groups (in all driver groups, regardless of their driving experience). In a cluster that presents rela- tively similar driving behaviour in real traffic conditions and in driving simulator, and in another group, the driving behaviour of which in the two contexts is totally different (see Fig. 7 respectively). This may due to the similar predictive model of some drivers or due to the fact that some drivers did not confront with the same responsibility the driving sessions in the simulator, and, as such, there is a significant deviation from their driving behaviour on road, and this does not seem to be related to their driving experience or the driving context. The second case is not likely to occur in processes where simulator driving ses- sions constitute part of the driving assessment for the acquisition (or renewal) of a driving license. In such a case, it would be meaningful to compare again the driving behaviour on road and in driving simulator. In other cases- where the driver does not have a direct benefit from his/her driving in the simulator, it would be perhaps effective if a kind of penalty could be applied in order to avoid the depreciation of the driving in simulators. Nevertheless and
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Measuring The Driver's Perception Error in the Traffic Accident Risk Evaluation

Measuring The Driver's Perception Error in the Traffic Accident Risk Evaluation

traffic accidents the main cause is certainly human error. In fact, relative proportion of contributing factors due to the driver behaviour amounts to 93%, while 30% is the relative proportion linked to the interrelation between roadway and driver factors [2]. Considering this evidence, the road safety concept cannot be separated from the analysis of human behaviour, the driver being a contributing factor that can be modified; in other words the driving behaviour can be adapted to the road, environment and vehicle conditions. So, traffic accidents and accident severities can be reduced by implementing specific measures to target the driving behaviour [2]. The report of the World Health The report of the World Health Organization confirms that among all the risk factors related to the driving behaviour, speeding is considered as the major road safety problem in all countries. There are some studies in the literature investigating speeding as the cause of accident. As an example, the study of Cabral et al.[3] aims to contribute to the reduction of accidents caused by speeding, and, through the use of multisensory information, to help the driver maintain a more regular driving and controlled speed.
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Incidence, prevalence, and hybrid approaches to calculating disability-adjusted life years

Incidence, prevalence, and hybrid approaches to calculating disability-adjusted life years

What, then, can we do to avoid that kind of chimeric measure? The most common strategy is to change the YLD calculation method to bring it in line with that used to count YLLs. So, instead of looking at the amount of disability experienced in 2004, we instead pick some type of event and look at the future stream of disability connected with events of that type occurring in 2004. We might, for example, look at all disabling events, like we looked at deaths. If I go permanently blind (DW = 0.6) in 2004 at age 30, we could attribute 50 years x 0.6 = 30 DALYs to 2004’s YLD count. Your blindness, however, which struck in 2003, wouldn’t be counted at all; its full impact would have been registered in 2003’ s YLD count. This approach is called an incidence perspective , and it is the method most commonly used to calculate DALYs. With a few qualifications to be discussed below,
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Driving and dementia

Driving and dementia

Corroborated history. Assessment of driving safety begins with a careful corroborated history to obtain an accurate report of family member concerns and docu- mentation of previous motor vehicle accidents or near accidents. This corroborated history can be obtained in the context of a full discussion with family about all medical and safety issues, with permission usually sought from the patient when discussing any issues with family. The family member should be interviewed alone, allowing for safe disclosure of any driving con- cerns. A history of a motor vehicle crash within the pre- vious 2 years has been shown to be a strong predictor of future motor vehicle crashes. 16 When family members
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