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Active Learning In Business Analytics Course Through Educational Games

Active Learning In Business Analytics Course Through Educational Games

Previous studies have shown that educational games are touted to successfully aid the transfer process of prior concepts and knowledge learned (Luchi, Montrezor, & Marcondes, 2017) and highly increase the level of student motivation for their participation in classroom activities (Braghirolli, Ribeiro, Weise, & Pizzolato, 2016). Here, educational games or serious games are defined as games designed to primarily achieve an educational objective. Furthermore, they are able to guide these individuals on certain concepts and reinforce their development and skills (Battistella & von Wangenheim, 2016). Besides, the characteristics associated with the games such as the rules, winning, and pay-offs make learning more interesting and increase its effectiveness (De Freitas, 2006; Kirriemuir & McFarlane, 2004). There are no specific games for business analytics, however, despite digital games related to learning statistics and mathematics having gained substantial popularity (Lekka et al., 2017). To help the students towards better learning and improving their analytics skills, these games need to be linked with business simulation games.
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Intrinsic fantasy: motivation and affect in educational games made by children

Intrinsic fantasy: motivation and affect in educational games made by children

Abstract: The concept of intrinsic fantasy has been considered central to the aim of usefully applying the positive affect of computer games to learning. Games with intrinsic fantasy are defined as having “an integral and continuing relationship with the instructional content being presented”, and are claimed as “more interesting and more educational” than extrinsic fantasy games [1]. Studies of children making educational games have shown they usually create extrinsic games for curriculum learning content. In this study, children were encouraged to create non-curriculum games, more easily distanced from the extrinsic preconceptions of formal schooling. Forty, 7-11 year olds took part in this study (17 boys and 23 girls), designing and making their own games at an after-school club. Despite non-curriculum learning content, no more intrinsic games were created than in previous studies. The children failed to create their own pedagogical models for non-curriculum content and did not see the educational value of intrinsic fantasy games. The implications for transfer and learning in intrinsic games are discussed whilst the definition of intrinsic fantasy itself is questioned. It is argued that the integral relationship of fantasy is unlikely to be the most critical means of improving the educational effectiveness of digital games.
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Student's opinions on online educational games for learning programming introductory

Student's opinions on online educational games for learning programming introductory

A study investigated the potential of educational games to learn History subject [1]. Data was collected at a secondary school in Bangi Malaysia. It was found that more than 90% of the students have experience in playing computer games. As a matter of fact, more than 30% of the student plays game more than 3 hours per week. About the popular platforms., around 60% students plays game using console followed by using computer, handheld and other devices. The most popular genres are adventure games (more than 60%), trailed by fighting games, puzzles and sports games. Asking about the reason why they play the games, about 70% says they play game for fun while more than 60% because they need to fill up free time, fantasy features in games (46%), followed by adventurous features and challenge. Most student think that the advantage of game plays are fun, improving electronic skills, calming themselves down, fill up free time as well as inducing their creativity. He suggested that educational games have high potential to be used as the substitute approach to the subject considered as boring such as history subject.
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Learner Modeling Using Educational Games: A Review of the Literature

Learner Modeling Using Educational Games: A Review of the Literature

In this review, we will observe those methods that model learners explicitly and the ones that model them implicitly. The difference between explicit and implicit methods of learner modeling is related to the ways of extracting information about learners. An implicit method aims to extract information about learners in a hidden and unobtrusive way, without endangering the high level of engagement provided by educational games. On the other hand, an explicit method aims to use a direct and obvious way of extract- ing information and making it overt to learners. The next section of the paper presents identified methods that have already been used to model the learner explicitly. Section 3 presents methods used to generate learner models implicitly. Section 4 introduces the taxonomy of learner modeling methods which use educational games. Sections 5 and 6 describe and discuss several educational games used to model the learners. Lastly, con- clusions are drawn and directions for future work are presented.
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Student perceptions of educational games in higher education : an empirical study

Student perceptions of educational games in higher education : an empirical study

Educational games are found to be as an effective learning tool as stated in various literatures. Garris et al [4] have found that EGs are able to help student on various learning domains such as cognitive, affective as well as psychomotor skills [4]. Among the EG findings that is widely discussed is its ability to increase student motivation to learn [5], [6], [7], [8]. One of the most important factors in education is motivation to learn. Therefore, a highly motivating EG should be able to transform learning approach like never before. A study by Garzotto [9] revealed that multiplayer online games provide learning benefits on affective level as well as knowledge domain. Other studies also acknowledged the benefits of using games for learning such as [10], [11], [12] and [13]. According to these studies, game motivates learning, offer immediate feedback, support skills, and influences changes in behavior and attitudes. Even though much promise have been suggested, much user assessment and design features are still left to be explored due to (its) the infancy of the field [14].
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Educational games in geriatric medicine education: a systematic review

Educational games in geriatric medicine education: a systematic review

with the dates of their inception: the EPOC Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CEN- TRAL), MEDLINE (1966 onwards), EMBASE (1980 onwards), PsycINFO (1967 onwards), CINAHL (1982 onwards), AMED (1985 onwards), ERIC (1966 onwards), and Dissertation Abstracts Online (1980 onwards). The electronic search strategies used no language restrictions and combined the methodological component of the search strategy of Cochrane Effective Practice and Orga- nization of Care Group (EPOC) with selected MeSH and free text terms relating to educational games (additional file 1). Additional search strategies included searching the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) for relevant systematic reviews and screening of the refer- ence list of included studies and relevant reviews. We complemented the search in 2009 by searching the ISI Web of Science for papers citing the studies included in this review.
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Students perceptions of using educational games to learn
introductory programming

Students perceptions of using educational games to learn introductory programming

Games purposely designed for education definitely requires some degree of effectiveness in order to be accepted by stakeholders. Researchers suggested that effective games should combine good game design and good pedagogy (Oblinger, 2006), (Amory & Seagram, 2003), (E. O. Klopfer, Scot. Salen, Katie, 2008). Games design here means similar concepts applied in entertainment games that should be adapted into educational games so it can offer certain degrees of engagement as in entertainment games. Our game design part consists of fun aspect including challenges, goals, feedback, and game story. These elements are derived from the concepts of game as describe by various authors (Novak, 2008), (Garzotto, 2007). These elements are said to be crucial in a games to really behave as a game as in (Owen, 2004), (Prensky, 2001), (Sauvé, 2007), (E. Klopfer & Scot O, 2008), (Grassioulet, 2002). Without those elements, games cannot really be claim as a games, but rather similar with edutainment concepts which many have found not really relevant anymore as suggested by Klopfer ans Scot (2008).
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Dynamically Adjusting Digital Educational Games Towards Learning Objectives

Dynamically Adjusting Digital Educational Games Towards Learning Objectives

The challenge of combining traditional pedagogic methodologies with state of the art gaming technology has led to exciting new approaches. These approaches, generally known as Digital Educational Games (DEG), promote both the curricular based learning objectives and the intrinsic motivation of the learner (Prensky 2003). However it can be argued that many DEGs focus more on the overall gaming experience by primarily promoting motivational aspects and not the overall learning objectives. Moreover the learning objectives tend to be pre-set throughout the game not taking the learner’s individual preferences and development into account (Rieber 1996). Recently two adaptive approaches addressing this shortcoming have been introduced and separately applied to DEG. The first approach, known as micro adaptivity, adapts Non Player Character (NPC) dialog in a specific learning situation to the skill level of the learner (Peirce et al. 2008) . The second approach, known as macro adaptivity, adapts the sequence of learning situations to the learners overall skill level and to gaming and story line constraints (Kickmeier-Rust et al. 2008). This paper introduces the integration of both approaches by allowing micro adaptive interventions inform macro adaptive decisions. The goal of this approach is to allow a more personal gaming experience by supporting both the motivation of the player and the learning objectives stated by a teacher/pedagogical expert, thus improving learning motivation with an overall dynamic and engaging storyline (Kickmeier-Rust & Albert 2010) (Kickmeier-Rust et al. 2008) (Peirce et al. 2008).
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Educational games as a motivational tool: Considerations on their potential and limitations

Educational games as a motivational tool: Considerations on their potential and limitations

result of both a general lack of polish (“young people nowadays are so used to a certain kind of gaming experience, that if you put in front of them a different kind, one that is seen as old, as simplified, as ugly [...] you don’t engage them”), and the paradoxical result of unmet expectations (“labelling a game as something which is designed to be educational and wholesome [...] turns people off”). In fact, for some players, the very act of designing games for an explicitly educational purpose limits their potential for fun and engagement (“stop making educational games immediately. Make games which happen to teach you, not educational games”). Additionally, since players have different tastes in terms of genres and themes, it may be impossible to design a game that appeals to an entire cohort of learners (“people have different tastes and like movies, sometimes you don’t want to sit down and watch action movies”). The players, however viewed somewhat more favourably the use of commercial off-the-shelf video games for a learning purpose (e.g. “[Portal 2] is a perfect example of what, in my opinion, should be done [...] it’s a game in which you have to think”).
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Towards a Low Cost Adaptation of Educational Games for People with Disabilities

Towards a Low Cost Adaptation of Educational Games for People with Disabilities

Abstract. In this paper we analyze how to increase the level of accessibility in videogames by adding support for it in game authoring software. This approach can reduce the effort required to make a game accessible for people with disabilities, resulting in significant savings. A case study is presented to support the approach based on the eAdventure educational game authoring platform, which allows semi-automatic adaptation of the games. The game, "My First Day At Work", was made accessible for students with different disability profiles, mainly blindness, low vision and limited mobility, although hearing and cognitive disabilities are also considered. Results show that the effort needed to make the games accessible is moderate in comparison to the total effort dedicated to game development. Although the specific solutions proposed are optimized for educational games, they could be generalized to other game frameworks and purposes (e.g. entertainment, advertising, etc.).
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Motivating Factors and Tangential Learning for Knowledge Acquisition in Educational Games

Motivating Factors and Tangential Learning for Knowledge Acquisition in Educational Games

Despite the strong interest among researchers as well as among consumers and learners it seems that the educational games that are designed and developed today do not grab the target audience's attention. One factor that partly can explain the absence of success might be that many educational games do not reach the same standards of graphics and game mechanics as players of COTS games are used to (Kerawalla & Crook, 2005). A theory on how educational games can be designed to stimulate motivation can be found in Lepper & Malone's (1986) taxonomy of intrinsic motivations for learning and ideas on intrinsic integration have been described by Habgood & Ainsworth (2011). However, despite several research studies on the design of educational games (Gee, 2003; Dickey, 2007, Brusse et al, 2010; Tang & Hanneghan, 2014), there still seems to be a gap between theories and ideas in research, and the actual implementation and construction of educational games.
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A content and design analysis of interactive educational games on the Internet

A content and design analysis of interactive educational games on the Internet

confidence, reasoning, and willingness to solve problems and encouraged mental computation and estimation”(Holbrook, E. p.33). Not only are games fun for students to play, but also they help them learn. This is encouraging news for educational game inventors or entrepreneurs. The inventors of interactive educational games on the web will need to pay attention to the success of classic games that have been played in the classroom for years to make sure the Internet games are as successful.

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The Effect of Using Educational Games in Teaching Kingdoms of Living Things

The Effect of Using Educational Games in Teaching Kingdoms of Living Things

prone to memorizing instead of learning by thorough comprehension. When learning such subject matter, students simply memorize the knowledge without processing it; thus, this knowledge is quickly forgotten. Traditional didactic teaching is a teacher-centered method carried out without any interaction between the teacher and students or among students themselves, and generally leads to boring and ineffective lessons [35]. Students can go beyond memorizing and realize a higher level of thinking only when they test their mental models related to a concept through problem-solving, inquiry, group work, being active with the subject matter. In order for students to achieve such a deep comprehension, educators generally favor classroom activities that encourage active learning [35]. Students can learn more effectively through active learning, a process whereby students directly participate in their own learning by interacting with other students to think critically and bolster the learning of new concepts. During these interactions, students might explain a concept to each other in different ways or express unnoted issues. This is not only a method of review but also a process requiring analysis and critical thinking [26]. Educational games require students’ active participation in the learning process.
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Educational Games for Learning

Educational Games for Learning

Abstract The introduction of new technologies in society has created a need for interactive contents that can make the most of the potential that technological advances offer. Serious games as educational games are such content: they can be defined as video games or interactive applications whose main purpose is to provide not only entertainment but also training in areas such as health, marketing, education, etc. This paper reviews various cases of successful serious games and their influence on the learning process, looks at tutoring as the key to guiding the learning process throughout serious games and considers what kind of abilities and skills can be achieved via such games. At this time of financial, economic and social crisis citizens must be prepared to confront the challenges of the future, and the individual values of each citizen must be joined to those of society as a whole. Serious games are the perfect tool for achieving these aims, and for transmitting contents and values attractively and efficiently.
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Designing educational games for computer programming: A holistic framework

Designing educational games for computer programming: A holistic framework

A multi-dimensional model called EFM (Effective learning environment, Flow experience and Motivation) has been proposed regarding the proper design of educational games by Song & Zhang (2008), as shown in Figure 5. According to this model, an educational game’s environment should be able to support seven fundamental requirements that are highly interconnected with the other axes proposed in the model. These requirements include the availability of appropriate tools within the game as well as the sense of motivation along with the sense of direct engagement to activate students in the learning process. Moreover, the designers should ensure to avoid any possible distractions that could sway students’ attention away from learning and enable a constant sense of challenge that will allow them to go through all of the activities scheduled by the teachers and accomplished the clearly set educational goals.
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Enhancement of educational games based on personality type indicators

Enhancement of educational games based on personality type indicators

In adaptation process, the first consideration is to identify which components of the learning experience are going to be adapted.[6] Game-elements are one of the most important parts of GBL environments and using them appropriately will have positive impact on learning process. As [5] mentioned designing mechanisms and contents of game in a manner which can support using game-elements is an important task. Also choosing best matching game-elements and arranging them together to maximize learners’ outcomes is necessary for developing educational games. The way we arrange game-elements together could adapt learning environment to our pedagogical goals. Another consideration in adaption process is that there are many different parameters for deciding how to adapt the system, such as learner’s knowledge level, different learning objectives, user preferences and learning styles[6]. Users’ personality type is one of the most important learners’ specifications that game- elements in an adaptive learning system can be arranged based on it.
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Development of Educational Games for The Introduction of Fruits and Vitamins

Development of Educational Games for The Introduction of Fruits and Vitamins

The use of digital educational games in Indonesia has been carried out by many researchers. Dwiyono in 2017 uses the game as an interactive learning media to describe the use of hand tools and power equipment. In his research, Dwiyono got the results, that the educational game built was feasible to be used as a learning media (Dwiyono, 2017). Sulistyowati and Andy Rachman in 2017 used 3D virtual reality technology as a learning media for mathematics for elementary school children, wherein this study the application was built to get a user satisfaction rating of 93.59% and the material made received an assessment of 80.84% where the application tested on the show UN-Habitat Precom 3 and Indonesia Shari'a Economic Festival (ISEF) 2016 (Sulistyowati & Rachman, 2017). Tirtamayasandi in 2018 presented his research on the use of educational games in understanding science-based straight-motion material at Klaten Muhammadiyah I Middle School. In this study, Tirtamayasandi stated that effective educational games were used to improve the understanding of learning material (Tirtamayasandi, 2018).
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Quality Criteria for Educational Games

Quality Criteria for Educational Games

In this paper we discuss a set of quality criteria and a method to assess the quality of educational games. These quality criteria are based on the functional requirements of the system and structured into two groups: general and specific. General criteria refer to the set of criteria that are common to all educational games in a given study area. Specific criteria refer to those criteria particularly addressing a specific educational purpose. We also present a quality model that is based on the software engineering paradigms. This model, called Quantitative Evaluation Framework, provides a quantitative measure for the quality of an educational game.
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Exploring the Learning Mechanism in Educational Games

Exploring the Learning Mechanism in Educational Games

The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the problem- based gaming model that tries to explain the learning process in educational games. The model was studied through Geometry game aimed for pre-school children (N = 24). The game relays on learning by teaching approach and involves AI-engine modeling the human concept learning structures. The qualitative analyses were used to explore participants’ learning processes and gaming strategies. The results indicated that the model well describes the problem-based gaming process in which the reflection phase seems to be a vital factor. Furthermore, the changes in playing strategies were found to enhance learning.
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Motivating children to learn effectively:
exploring the value of intrinsic integration
in educational games

Motivating children to learn effectively: exploring the value of intrinsic integration in educational games

Having described our approach to intrinsic integration we can now turn to considering what advantages or indeed disadvantages it might bring for learning. The central claimed benefit of educational games and intrinsic integration lies in the potential to more effectively motivate and engage the player in the learning content of a game. (e.g. Garris, Ahlers, & Driskell, 2002; Rieber, 1991). As such flow is often considered to be critical in creating and maintaining this motivational appeal. Integrating learning content into the very parts of the gameplay which give rise to the flow experience should ensure that the benefits of the flow are directed towards educational goals. Conversely, edutainment or extrinsic games which provide gameplay as a reward for learning content are more likely to disrupt flow if players are asked to regularly switch their to another non-flow inducing activity. Moreover the flow state in extrinsic games is therefore experienced in the service of game but not educational goals. However, whilst intrinsic integration in educational games may increase motivation and flow, it is not completely clear how this translates into increased learning (Pintrich, 2003). Mechanisms that have been postulated include persistence, more focused attention, increased arousal, increased affect and alternative strategies (Garris et al., 2002; Martens, Gulikers, & Bastiaens, 2004; Parkin, Lewinsohn, & Folkard, 1982; Pintrich, 2003; Vollmeyer & Rheinberg, 2000).
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