European Area for Higher Education

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Industrial Engineering Higher Education in the European Area (EHEA)

Industrial Engineering Higher Education in the European Area (EHEA)

In the paper with title “Different applications of concept maps in Higher Education”, Amparo Bes Piá et al. show different applications of concept maps in higher education, concretely in qualifications of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. They used different methodologies depending on the application of concept maps. Students consider the concept maps useful mainly to select key ideas, to achieve a comprehensive view of the lesson, and to bring up the subject. Moreover, concept maps promote the active and meaningful learning, help students to understand, follow-up, and learn subjects with a high load of contents. They can be applied as a technique to study or as a learning tool promoting reflection, analysis, and creativity. The authors state that the tool can be applied to any discipline (basics, social or applied sciences) and at any level of education.
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Assessment of Colleges’ Activity Quality: the Bologna Process Dimensions

Assessment of Colleges’ Activity Quality: the Bologna Process Dimensions

The first steps of the Bologna process towards the united European study and science area began in 1997 when the Lisbon Convention for the recognition of qualifi- cations connected with higher education in the European region was signed (Lisbon Convention, 1997). In June of 1999 the Bologna Declaration was signed and it laid the foundations for the creation of the common area of higher education till 2010. In the declaration the objectives for introducing the common system of European credit trans- fer system (ECTS), agreeing on that it takes at least 3 years to get a bachelor degree, promoting the cooperation in quality assurance in study and science, stimulating the im- plantation of European dimension in higher education were confirmed (Bologna Declaration, 1999). In 2001 with the aim to strengthen the Bologna process, the Prague Com- munique was signed and there were priorities for develop- ing ability to study life-long and increasing competitive ability and attraction of the common European area of higher education were distinguished, while emphasizing the main elements of the European area of higher educa- tion (Prague Communique, 2001). In 2002 the Copenhagen Declaration that is very important for the sector of col- leges, for paying maximum attention to inter-institutional cooperation and strengthening quality assurance in voca- tional training was signed. Its aim is to improve the quality and attraction of vocational training (including the situa- tion of vocational training in the framework of general education). This can be achieved creating the means at the European level and increasing the transparency and recog- nition of qualifications and competences, defining the di- mensions of the reform of national vocational training sys- tems, accenting the adaptation of these systems to the de- mands of knowledge society and the ambition for becom- ing flexible systems, oriented to the supply of individual needs and to the students (Copenhagen Declaration, 2002). In 2003 the Berlin Communique defined a few priorities, one of them – the essential demand to develop collectively adopted quality assurance criteria and methods (Berlin Communique, 2003).
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Profile and competences of Spanish industrial engineers in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA)

Profile and competences of Spanish industrial engineers in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA)

The aim of this document is to develop a clear definition of industrial engineering. To this end we identify here the professional profiles to be expected of those graduating from such courses, specifying the technology employed, the problems treated and the population served by the industrial engineers (Ferguson, 2006; Thompson, 1967). We deal with meanings and proposals for Industrial Engineers within a European context, drawing information from the academic debate which has been launched in a number of scientific publications (using “Engineering and industrial and education” as keyword in Web Of Science, Science Direct and EBSCO Business Source Premier databases). We also draw on professional recruitment figures (De Miguel Fernández, 1995; Martínez Costa, Calvet Puig, Pons Peregort, & Tura Solvas, 2007).
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University Lecturers’ Conceptions of Ethics and Citizenship Education in the European Higher Education Area: a Case Study

University Lecturers’ Conceptions of Ethics and Citizenship Education in the European Higher Education Area: a Case Study

kind of education oriented towards professional practice did not form part of the curricula of university education, which was wholly focused on intellectuality and the search for truth (verum), good (bonum) and beauty (pulchrum) (Rüegg, 1992; Berube, 2007). However, when the first universities were founded, formalised mass education systems did not exist. These emerged in the mid 19th century in several European countries and the United States, and they took responsibility for the Ethics and Citizenship education of the new generations. Thus, universities divest themselves of one of the functions that gave them meaning. In addition, the defenders of this version not unjustifiably point out that the line separating Ethics and Citizenship education and indoctrination is too fine. Authors like Derek Bok (Bok, 2007) warn of the dangers entailed by thoughts like those of Henry Giroux, which encourage critical pedagogy (Giroux, 2007).
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Legislative basis of the bologna process standards implementation in Ukrainian higher education

Legislative basis of the bologna process standards implementation in Ukrainian higher education

The Bologna process had its background, the idea to create the unique education area in Europe appeared in 1986. The oldest in Europe Bologna University, in an Italian city of Bologna, proposed to all European universities to adopt the Great University Charter (Magna Charta Universitatum). In 1988 this document was signed by the rectors of 80 universities. The start of The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) began from this moment. The process is developing by signing the European Lisbon Convention (1997) on the recognition of qualifications for the European Higher Education area. In Paris in 1998, four education ministers Claude Allegre (France), Jürgen Rüttgers (Germany), Luigi Berlinguer (Italy) and Baroness Blackstone (UK) participating in the celebration of the 800th anniversary of the University of Paris, shared the view that the segmentation of the European higher education sector in Europe was outdated and signed the Sorbonne declaration (Sorbonne Declaration, 1998), committing themselves to “harmonising the architecture of the European Higher Education system”. The decision to engage in a voluntary process to create the European Higher Education Area was legalized one year later in Bologna. In 1999, there was a conference in Bologna (Italy), on which 29 Ministers of education of European countries adopted “Bologna Declaration” (Bologna Declaration, 1999). The creation of a unique European Higher Education Area is called the Bologna Process. The process was opened to other countries in the European Cultural Convention of the Council of Europe, and governmental meetings have been held in Prague (2001), Berlin (2003), Bergen (2005), London (2007) and Leuven (2009).
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Kosovo’s Verification Procedure for Diplomas issued by Private Providers of Higher Education

Kosovo’s Verification Procedure for Diplomas issued by Private Providers of Higher Education

In 2004 Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) developed the “Strategy for Development of Higher Education in Kosovo 2005-2015”. This strategy envisages a vision for the whole higher education system. The crucial aim of this Strategy is the facilitation of the journey of Kosovo to be an integral part of European Higher Education Area which is considered as the most difficult challenge. The strategy regulates the national higher education system which is completely in compliance with the principles of the Bologna Process. Although Kosovo has not ratified the European Cultural Convention, it is still a priority for the Strategy to fully implement the Bologna process. The aim of this Strategy is the transformation, reform and development of the higher education according to a more efficient model of planning, administration and management. 38 The Strategy now is in the second phase 39 of its implementation which priorities the development of institutional and human capacities and piloting of innovations in the system.
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The European Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) European Higher Education Area levels 7 and 8 postgraduate benchmarking document for Radiation TherapisTs (RTTs)

The European Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) European Higher Education Area levels 7 and 8 postgraduate benchmarking document for Radiation TherapisTs (RTTs)

The European Higher Education Area was created as part of the Bologna Process and launched in 2010 when the Budapest-Vienna Declaration was adopted, with the main objec- tive to ensure more comparable, compatible and coherent systems of higher education in Europe (www.ehea.org). Through the provision of quality higher education the aims were to strengthen mobility to enhance education and graduate employ- ability. The Bucharest Communique of 2012 reiterated the aspiration of the need for graduates to be able to ‘‘combine transversal, multidisciplinary and innovation skills and compe- tences with up-to-date subject-specific knowledge so as to be able to contribute to the wider needs of society and the labour market”.
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Diagnosis of the Skills of the Master’s Degree: Case Study at the University Pablo of Olavide
                Diagnóstico de las competencias de los másteres oficiales: estudio de caso en la Universidad Pablo de Olavide

Diagnosis of the Skills of the Master’s Degree: Case Study at the University Pablo of Olavide Diagnóstico de las competencias de los másteres oficiales: estudio de caso en la Universidad Pablo de Olavide

The implementation of the European Higher Education Area (henceforth EHEA) in official university master’s degrees warns that the didactic planning of a curriculum can not be restricted to distribute contents to different subjects in a schedule using the European Credits Transfer System (henceforth ECTS) as a count- ing system of the teaching activity. It is true that they have taken into account this situation and that they have designed working environments which deployinterconnected differential strategies conforming to planning based on competencies (Alvarez -Arregui, Rodríguez-Martín, Madrigal-Maldonado, Grossi-Sampedro, & Arreguit, 2017). However, university education still requires the improvement of innovative pedagogical processes and scientif- ic-technical development (Moreno-Murcia, Silveira, & Belando, 2015).
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Are Men And Women Different In European Higher Education Area?

Are Men And Women Different In European Higher Education Area?

But, as is well known, whether these percent differences are significant or not depend on the sample size and how asymmetric are the margins. To test the statistical significance of the above differences, we carry out a Ji- squared test of independence between the levels of the two attributes under study. The  2 statistics is equal to 29.86, under the null hypothesis of independence, so we reject (at a significance level of 5%) that the attributes level of degree and gender are independents. From the sample value of the Yule’s Q (0.07) we can conclude that the existing association is positive, that is, the percentage of women with a 3-years Degree significantly exceeds the corresponding percentage in men; on the contrary, the percentage of men with a 5-year Degree significantly exceeds the corresponding percentage in women. However, and according to our preliminary suspicion, the above association of women with a 3-year Degree and men with a 5-year Degree is very weak. In this sense (3-year or 5- year degree graduates), we could state that the gender differences in education are very slight, at least at the University of Castilla-La Mancha.
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Analysis of the didactic use of tablets in the European Higher Education Area

Analysis of the didactic use of tablets in the European Higher Education Area

This article presents a study in which we analyse the didactic use of tablets in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The competential and didactic use of mobile devices is a challenge for lecturers, students and universities alike. In the current university system, mobile devices play a key role that requires rigorous analysis to open up new channels of participation and didactic design in accordance with the EHEA. The research is contextualised in a sample of 419 students from three Spanish public universities: Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), University of Oviedo and National University of Distance Education (UNED), Spain. Through a quantitative and qualitative methodological approach, we proceeded to analyse the life stories of students who are familiar with tablets and use them in both their personal lives and for their university studies. The results show that this mobile device can be a useful resource in information processing, content access and creation, and generic competency development in line with the Dublin Descriptors and the main recommendations of the Tuning, Reflex and EUConverge European projects.
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TWO EUROPEAN RESPONSES TO ASSURE QUALITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION

TWO EUROPEAN RESPONSES TO ASSURE QUALITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Lo­o­king at the “Eu­ro­pean Higher Edu­catio­n Area” in terms o­f their different qu­ality assu­rance systems one can clear­ly identify a gr­eat diver­sity. This situ­ation r­eflects the cr­eativity of all cou­ntr­ies to estab­ lish a system compatible with their­ own cu­ltu­r­al, economic and social backgr­ou­nd. This ar­ticle shall highlight examples of two Eu­r­opean cou­ntr­ies, Ger­many and the United Kingdom, and their­ effor­ts to develop a compr­ehensive qu­ality assu­r­ance system. A systematic and histor­ical appr­oach of these two nations will be based on liter­atu­r­e r­esear­ch, scientific stu­dies and per­sonal exper­ience. The ar­ticle will pr­ovide a gener­al per­spective on two differ­ent national qu­ality assu­r­ance systems as well as their­ cu­r­r­ent political discu­ssions dr­awn fr­om an Au­str­ian per­spective. The exter­nal view bu­t nonetheless Eu­r­opean per­spective shall maintain a mor­e objective r­eview and assessment of these cou­ntr­ies. Althou­gh ther­e ar­e diver­sified qu­ality assu­r­ance systems all over­ Eu­r­ope, ther­e is a need and a will to cooper­ate between this diver­sity while still keeping the individu­ality of the own cou­ntr­y. Thu­s, I am inter­ested in the develop­ ment, the challenges as well as pr­oblems of these systems and possible ways for­ impr­ovement.
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European Higher Education in the Context of Brexit

European Higher Education in the Context of Brexit

All this means that the general direction of the discourse in the Europeanisation of higher education, both in the context of the Bologna Process and the EU, is very much in line with the UK’s approach, and benefits its model of higher education and its eco- nomic stakes in that model. Brexit is unlikely, as such, to bring any changes in this re- gard. The extent to which the UK will be able to continue to directly benefit from this development of continental higher education into a market-model like its own, is how- ever likely to change fundamentally with Brexit. As the analysis in section III.2. showed, UK higher education institutions rely heavily on EU law to be able to offer services in other Member States and to be able to import talented students (the financial picture of which is unclear but which may, under the high tuition fee system, bring direct econom- ic benefits to the universities as well as many indirect beneficial effects), and – through EU research grants – for the overall funding of its higher education and research and development sector(s). In this regard, the UK stands to lose more from Brexit than the other EU Member States: EU students, teachers, researchers and higher education insti- tutions will still have access to 27 higher education systems, and they can continue to create a fully effective internal higher education and research area, as well as an inter- nal market for higher education. In fact, now that following the UK’s lead, EU Member States’ higher education systems have become each other’s competitors, there is much to gain from the UK’s weakening role, and some other Member States are indeed gear- ing up to take over from the UK as “EU leader in Higher Education”. Higher education may turn into one of Brexit’s major spoils.
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New Patterns in Student Mobility in Southern Africa Development Community

New Patterns in Student Mobility in Southern Africa Development Community

Over 1.5 million students were enrolled in higher education institutions in SADC in 2009, a 13-fold increase since 1970, which is much faster than the growth for the world (5-fold increase) but slower than that for Sub-Saharan Africa as a whole (20-fold increase). The increasing demand for higher education in the region is evident when comparing the growth in tertiary enrolment with that in the population of tertiary age. As shown in Figure 1, the growth in tertiary enrolment, which started to soar in 1990, is much faster than that in the relevant tertiary-age population (13 times for enrolment versus 3 times for population). In Sub-Saharan Africa, a much higher ratio of participation in secondary than tertiary education points to even greater pressure for further growth as more and more graduates from upper secondary schools seek to pursue higher education (UNESCO-UIS, 2010b), either in local education institutions or by studying abroad. In addition, to accumulate the knowledge and skills needed for the long-term growth prospects of Sub-Saharan Africa, it is critical to stimulate investment in tertiary-level training, as advised by the World Bank (World Bank, 2009). Thus, one can foresee further expansion of higher education systems in the region.
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Higher education in the EU countries: comparative geographical analysis

Higher education in the EU countries: comparative geographical analysis

The leaders (more than 200 higher education institutions) are Germany, France, Italy, Poland. The largest group has 11-100 higher education institutions (countries of Northern and Eastern Europe, Spain, Ireland, Malta, Cyprus). Luxembourg is an outsider. It lacks universities, and students study in France, Germany and other EU countries.

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Higher education, consumed!

Higher education, consumed!

students themselves falling victim to the trenchant imperatives of HE’s conformity to this vacuous and ungrounded consumer model. This model leaves students both dissatisfied as consumers as well as being left short on a what a higher education could offer them: specifically, it has the ‘perverse effect of preventing students from gaining a sense of intellectual satisfaction, or enjoyment, from their course at precisely the time when universities most seek to have demonstrably satisfied their students’ [92]. Both these outcomes are a product and demonstration of the books’ claim that the consumer model of HE is fundamentally opposed to all the ideals on which HE is based, and stands in contrast to a relationship as a ‘conversation between the generations’ which is structured by purpose and content. Despite all the talk of employability, inclusivity, freedom, choice, and satisfaction, under this latest of models students are as disempowered, lost, and more anxious and ‘alienated from the academic disciplinary communities’ than ever before [86].
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A Phenomenological Study of Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education of Pakistan

A Phenomenological Study of Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education of Pakistan

Sustainable development was foremost defined by the Brundtland Commission as a package of resources i.e. ecological, social and economical which are capable of satiating the present needs without endangering the capability of upcoming generations for fulfilling their own needs (WCED, 1987). These three factors are interdependent on each other in order to harmonize the world’s sustainability. Learning must be taken place according to this sustainability concept while transforming behaviours of the population towards the sensitivity of the issue; this can only be done with the help of awareness campaigns and formal and informal education(Khalifa & Sandholz, 2012). The role of this proposition at higher education is more crucial than compulsory education due to the fact that at this stage students have chosen their career orientation while they would be going to put their first step in labour and competitive market adorned with skill to earn their livelihood while if this young labour also prove themselves as sustainable leaders ensuring sustainability of their surroundings then higher education would ultimately deliver its best on the issue. That is why a broad debate had been identified among educationists and researchers about the competencies that they should be adorned with at the end of their university education (Wiek, Withycombe, Redman, & Mills, 2011).Weik et al (2012) discussed these skills as an open plan of action for formulating courses of academic programs in which clear reference and particulars about training should also be represented in relation to overall development of a graduate; progress at each phase of learning as well as effective pedagogies for fulfilling this need; reliable and appropriate resources for students in order to assist them in performing their professional actions currently and also for future problem resolution, they could act as change agents in order to settle conversion processes tolerably (Hidalgo & Fuentes., 2013; Willard et al., 2010).
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Electronic Document Management System for Higher Education Institution

Electronic Document Management System for Higher Education Institution

Abstract :- The study looked into the current document management problems in Higher Education Institution based on the QMS of ISO 9001. It found several discrepancies in terms of tracking, keeping and transferring of the memoranda and files from one office to another. These files were elicited from several circumstances such as loss of documents and redundancy, to name a few. Because of these problems, an Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) was introduced. The study used two methods such as the Spiral Model and the In-house Development Program. The EDMS was completed and tested by the three colleges of Capitol University namely, Computer Studies, Business Administration, and Criminology. Moreover, the modules of EDMS were also evaluated by deans and secretaries of the same colleges. The evaluation phase found differences in terms of time spent for the documents that were covered and was further monetized to visualize cost-reduction measures as a tool for its implementation. As the result, EDMS is acceptable in terms of quality, time spent, and cost. It is recommended that the EDMS must be fully implemented in all colleges in the university. It is further recommended that there should be another study to upgrade the EDMS and to make it on-line for a centralized and efficient way of monitoring and tracking the documents.
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Higher education and growth performance of Eastern European countries

Higher education and growth performance of Eastern European countries

Some of the researchers investigate the causal relationship between education and growth rate of income. For example, Islam et al. (2007) find bidirectional causality between education and growth in Bangladesh. Chaudhary et al. (2009) report a unidirectional causality running from economic growth to higher education enrollment ratio for Pakistan from 1972 to 2005. Huang et al. (2009) show that there is a bidirectional causality between higher education enrollment and the growth of GDP per capita in China between 1971 and 2007. Pradham (2009) demonstrates that there is a unidirectional causality running from economic growth to education in India from 1951 to 2002. Danacica (2011) finds evidence of unidirectional causality between education and economic growth in Romania for the period of 1985 to 2009. Zivengwa (2012) reports a unidirectional causality running from education to economic growth in Zimbabwe from 1980 to 2008. Qazi et al. (2014) find bidirectional causal relationship between higher education and economic growth in Pakistan from 1980 to 2011.
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Policy Governance without Government in European Higher Education

Policy Governance without Government in European Higher Education

The paper argues that the Bologna Process as a set of policy initiatives which exists at the margins of the EU framework embodies a case of Governmentality in a context of Governance without Government. This is due to the distinctive regulatory characteristics of the Bologna Process which encompass; its non- legislative character; the voluntary adaptation and participation of the member- states to the process; the extension of the Process to non EU members; and, finally, its peculiarity as a set of common guidelines, the realisation of which differ within each member-state. These characteristics introduce a modality of policy governance in European higher education that aims to tackle the challenges of globalisation beyond traditional forms of government.
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Higher Education in Asia: Expanding Out, Expanding Up - The Rise of Graduate Education and University Research

Higher Education in Asia: Expanding Out, Expanding Up - The Rise of Graduate Education and University Research

citations as a measure of research quality is subject to a halo effect (Hazelkorn, 2009a). Secondly, since most top-tier journals are in English, it works against researchers who did not study or do not work in an English-speaking country. Third, critics point to the relative neglect of teaching quality in ranking systems. Ranking systems do not necessarily measure what many educators regard as the most important output of higher education. Fourth, critics observe that the intense competition to publish may push university researchers toward more applied research and away from basic research, which they see as having long- term negative consequences for national economic development. Finally, critics are concerned that the emphasis on top-tier universities has led many governments to concentrate resources on a small number of elite universities rather than seeking a more balanced development of the higher education system (Hazelkorn, 2013). However, advocate or critic, governments and university leaders are not indifferent to ranking results (Salmi, 2011). table 16. illustration of institutional actions to promote high rankings
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