Evaluation research in social work

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An Evaluation Model for Social Work with Substance Abusers

An Evaluation Model for Social Work with Substance Abusers

It has noticed that the clients' expectations toward the treatment are important, along with the workers' attitudes, personalities and their relationship with the clients (Cloud & Granfield, 2008; Kuusisto & Saarnio, 2012). Therefore, any social work evaluation and evaluation by the use of a single research method may provide only a partial reflection of reality, for instance the use of only experimental designs or Campbell and Cochrane reviews (see e.g. Hansten et al., 2000; Ferri, Amato, Davoli, 2006; Hesse, Vanderplasschen, Rapp, Broekaert & Fridell, 2007; Kaner et al., 2007; Amato, Minozzi, Davoli & Vecci, 2011; Smedslund et al. 2011). This study illustrates that it is important also discuss and reflect on what works and under which circumstances, taking into account the clients' contexts and the different components of the interventions applied.
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Social work teaching partnership programme pilots : evaluation. Final research report, May 2016

Social work teaching partnership programme pilots : evaluation. Final research report, May 2016

Capability Framework which they saw as more obviously embedded into the curriculum. However, partnerships themselves reported considerable activity, including preparing academics and practitioners to embed and deliver the CSWKSS which should feed through to students over time. Reviews of the academic curriculum had taken place in all SWTPs with the intention of embedding the CSWKSS in future social work education programmes. In one partnership, a paper version of a Professional Development Career Portfolio integrating ASYE and the CSWKSS had been developed with the intention of transferring this to a digital platform with a life-long licence to be granted to the SWTP students, portable between HEIs and employers and to incorporate CPD. Implementation was now about to take place and the SWTP partners highlight it as a key success of the partnership activities. The portfolio is completely transferable and could be used by nurses, occupational therapists and others, not just social work and so has considerable reach (and added value).
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Operational research in the evaluation of social security benefit policies

Operational research in the evaluation of social security benefit policies

Studies in work carried out for the Social Democratic Party (Morris, 1982), have suggested that consumption is a more indicative measure of living standards than income. However, with the exception of the amount of a claimant's savings in assessing title to means-tested benefits, all social security measures since Beveridge reported have sought to provide some sort of minimum income irrespective of a person's stock of capital. Whilst it is as well to be aware of the possibility that some future Government may wish to relate its income maintenance system more closely to consumption rather than income - and again it is important to bear in mind the underlying philosophy of the Conservative Government's 'Family Policy Group* - it is suggested that some measure of income will remain the primary gauge of people's material standard of living for the foreseeable future. Moreover, even if a Government did wish to shift the emphasis towards consumption, much of the debate would inevitably continue to focus on incomes and so even in these circumstances income measures would retain their importance. Clearly, though, a data source which also has information on expenditure would have added value.
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Understanding the value of social media metrics for research evaluation

Understanding the value of social media metrics for research evaluation

of Science (Nederhof, 2006). In contrast, researchers and other professionals are mainly active in fields with a high citation density such as life & earth sciences, physical science & engineering, and biomedical & health sciences. These results are in line with other studies (Haustein & Larivière, 2014; Mohammadi, Thelwall, Haustein, and Larivier, 2015, Zahedi & Van Eck, 2015; Thelwall, 2017) that show that substantial differences in readership practices exist between (sub)fields and user types. In addition, in terms of topics of interest, the results of this chapter indicate that user types pay more attention to publications related to their roles and the purpose for which they use Mendeley. For instance, professors mostly save publications related to teaching and educational topics (e.g., higher education, medical education, and second language acquisition). This may be expected since professors use Mendeley among other reasons to organize literature for teaching and publishing. Fundamental or theoretical papers (such as business, management, and leadership) as source of course materials or as a source of reading for thesis work are more interesting for students. Researchers are relatively more interested in research fronts and applied sciences (climate research, pharmaceutical research, and biotechnology to astronomy and astrophysics). These results are in line with another study that showed that F1000 publications with the tag ‘good for teaching’ (papers with a good overview of a topic) were more relevant for Mendeley users classified as lecturers, while papers with the tag ‘new findings’ were mostly read by researchers (Bornmann & Haunschild, 2015). Librarians show relatively more interest in topics related to their work, namely bibliometrics and scientometrics, library science, research utilization, and clinical guidelines. Not surprisingly, the user group professionals (which includes for example medical doctors, nutritionists, and lawyers) is relatively more interested in practical and technical oriented topics (e.g., biological, medical, and clinical oriented topics). These results show that publications saved by different user types can be related to different contexts of use, such as education, (self) training, research, or practical and applied uses. Thus, although there is not enough evidence in the literature (Thelwall, 2016), publications mostly saved by students can be seen to have an educational interest, those saved by professionals to have a more professional interest, and the ones saved mostly by professors or researchers can be related to more scientific interests. The results in Chapter 6 emphasize the potential role of readership indicators for capturing the usage of scientific documents by a wide range of audiences.
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Evaluation of a non statutory ‘Place of Calm’, a service which provides support after a suicidal crisis to inform future commissioning intentions

Evaluation of a non statutory ‘Place of Calm’, a service which provides support after a suicidal crisis to inform future commissioning intentions

Microsoft Word Place of Calm Final Report docx 1 Centre for Social Work Research (CSWR), Cass School of Education and Communities University of East London Evaluation of a non statutory ‘Place of Calm[.]

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What (a) difference a degree makes : the evaluation of the new social work degree in England

What (a) difference a degree makes : the evaluation of the new social work degree in England

One of the major hurdles to answering the research questions was the lack of UK baseline data (Moriarty and Murray, 2007). To evaluate what difference a degree makes, it is necessary to have some measure of the performance of students who entered the workforce holding the original qualification that the degree is replacing. While there have been some studies evaluating social work education, these have been limited. For example, Shardlow and Walliss’s (2003) review of comparative studies of European social work found that the majority of studies were theoretical rather than empirical, and only two of the empirical studies in their sample focused on social work education. Carpenter (2005) has argued that while some studies have been retrospective, none has conformed to strict methods of evaluation over time. Focusing on ‘outcomes’ of social work education, how changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour may be attributed to teaching and learning opportunities, he argued for greater clarity about what is being measured and more rigour in evaluation methods. This rigour should include attention to both sample size and to effective measurement over time, drawing on data from a variety of sources.
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Preventive therapy and resilience promotion: an evaluation of social work led skills development group work

Preventive therapy and resilience promotion: an evaluation of social work led skills development group work

Social skills development therefore has an important preventive function arising from its capacity to enhance resilience in children and young people and specifically the appropriateness of the classroom as a setting for such activity (Wilson and Lipsey, 2007). Daniel (2002) and Gilligan (2004) argue the promotion of resilience is a key social work task. A more school focused form of social work offers the opportunity for practitioners to engage in these activities. However, the capacity to carry out such interventions cannot be assumed, since they frequently involve specialist interventions which can extend beyond the normal curriculum of social work education and training. How effectively can social workers carry out classroom based social skills development in children? And (as is often the case) if there is no formal training available, are they capable of the self-taught development of intervention skills? This study reports on a longitudinal, repeated measures, control trial of the impact of a class based, social worker led, social skills development in cohorts in two schools.
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Issues of LGBTQ in Substance Abuse Treatment for Social Workers

Issues of LGBTQ in Substance Abuse Treatment for Social Workers

Ruth is a 47-year-old African-American lesbian living in a large midwestern city. She is currently in an inpatient substance abuse treatment program that is gay sensitive. She has talked openly about being lesbian, and her partner of the past 25 years has been part of the treatment program. Ruth was admitted for help with her crack cocaine use. She grew up in a very poor part of the city but had developed supports and strengths at her local Baptist church. Ruth and her mother went to regular services and many social functions, and she developed many friendships. She did well in school and liked sports. She was surprised one day in the ninth grade when she read a story about a lesbian teacher and felt a sudden awareness of sexual feelings for other women. She went home to talk about it with her mother, who said she should talk to the minister. When Ruth told him about her feelings, he became very upset, said she was an abomination before God. Although some clergy are LGBT supportive, this minister asked Ruth’s mother to keep Ruth away from the church until she “recovered her senses.” Ruth’s mother agreed.
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Work-based training and job prospects for the unemployed: an evaluation of Training for Work (research report RR96)

Work-based training and job prospects for the unemployed: an evaluation of Training for Work (research report RR96)

qualifications. Secondly, comprehensive specifications were used, which included job and employer characteristics as well as the exogenous control variables. Examples of these are occupation, industry, size of establishment, and so on. These variables cannot really be considered exogenous, because one way in which TfW could have helped people into higher paid jobs was by increasing their access to high-paying occupations. Using job and employer characteristics as control variables may therefore lead us to underestimate the effect ofTfW. Nevertheless it was considered important to develop these models, because it was only with the inclusion of job and employer characteristics that the models could explain sufficient wage variation to be considered in any way reliable. The reduced form variables typically explain about ten per cent of the pay variation, with the employer and job characteristics contributing a further 20 per cent. Unless otherwise stated, it is the comprehensive specifications that are referred to below. As a prelude to the wages models, probit work participation models (not shown) were constructed in order to calculate the appropriate Heckman sample selection bias correction variables (Heckman 1 979). These models had typical levels of explanatory power and most of the variables had the expected signs.
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Justice in action? : social work and social justice in the 21st century : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work at Massey University, Manawatu, Aotearoa/New Zealand

Justice in action? : social work and social justice in the 21st century : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work at Massey University, Manawatu, Aotearoa/New Zealand

We’re not given the leeway by our employers, you know. You have your job d. You adhere to that, or you’re gonna be hauled in, you know, one day soon if you don’t, so yeah, I feel so constrained by the workplace culture of conservatism, you just end up concentrating on what you are told to do even if it doesn’t fit with social work ethics- You know, you can understand where it’s coming from too, if you’ve got a mortgage to pay, like kids and that - Tai. That the theme of social work identity in the workplace emerged so spectacularly was probably one of the most surprising outcomes of this research. Initially the questions I had framed were around gaining insight into how participants saw social work and how their ability to practice it accorded with their understanding (see appendix 2 and 3). These open questions were designed to illuminate to what extent the understandings of social justice were integrated into the definition and practice of social work. Instead of gaining said definitions of social work as seen by social work graduates between 2000 -2010 however, what emerged was a unanimous expression of frustration at how social work functioned in the reality of an agency environment. This occurred in every interview, and in each focus group as well as being the central topic in all of the additional written material the participants added post interview.
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Engaged in Research/Achieving Balance: A Case Example of Teaching Research to Masters of Social Work Students

Engaged in Research/Achieving Balance: A Case Example of Teaching Research to Masters of Social Work Students

This article considers the use of participatory action research and Photovoice as a tool for engaging graduate level social work students in research education. Photovoice is an investigative tool that assists people in critically reflecting on the everyday social and political realities of their lives, enriching their understanding of their communities and the issues pertinent to them, while at the same time, giving them a voice from which to educate others on these issues. In the context of a group assignment, 26 social work students, enrolled in an introductory graduate research course, were asked to reflect upon the question, “What does balance look like for you in the MSW program?” Thirty-two photographs with captions were submitted and analyzed by class members for relevant themes. Balance was described as existing along a continuum from balanced to unbalanced and was comprised of four major themes: connection, nurturance, keeping perspective, and disengagement. Although this teaching strategy was not formally assessed, preliminary impressions are that students benefited from participating in the Photovoice activity.
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Teaching research methods to social work students: a transnational critical reflection

Teaching research methods to social work students: a transnational critical reflection

Research is key to the continued develo pment of the theory and knowledge base of social work practice. Research is a key area of social work practice and is one of the six objectives included in the AASW Practice Standards for Social Workers which identifies that “ client needs,

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Design and analysis of a general data evaluation system based on social networks

Design and analysis of a general data evaluation system based on social networks

Wang et al. [15] add gray theory to BP neural network for predicting eggs ’ Haff value and evaluating freshness degree of eggs. The system automatically distinguished the egg shell color first, then the egg fresh degree can be predicted. Article [16] proposes that a preprocessing procedure on dense type of data, such as K-means, is presented using the error back propagation algorithm to predict share price. So appropriate pretreatment tech- niques of data could make the neural network execute more effectively to accept intensive data. In [17] has a research on movie box office forecasting based on a BP neural network. NAR [18] predicts a clearness index that is used to forecast global solar radiations. The NAR model is based on the feed forward multilayer percep- tion model with two inputs and one output. Reference [19] presents a BP neural net real-time data forecasting model which is suitable for the home environment by using the correlation between the indoor temperature, outdoor humidity, and indoor humidity. According to problems of petroleum price prediction and the feasibil- ity of petroleum price prediction model, the improved BP model [20] for petroleum price prediction is pro- posed. The hybrid training algorithm is combined with the improved particle swarm optimization and BP algo- rithm, while the improved PSO-BP ANN model is devel- oped and trained by the hybrid algorithm based on improved PSO and BP algorithm. In [21], the ice thick- ness in Bohai Sea is predicted using the hybrid neural network model, and a good fitness is revealed between the prediction and practical values.
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Prevention of Human Trafficking for Social Workers

Prevention of Human Trafficking for Social Workers

Owing to cultural and societal stigmas, people with disabilities, including individuals with physical, sensory, mental, cognitive, behavioral, or other visible and invisible disabilities, often lack access to social support networks. Prejudices contribute to biases in law enforcement or judicial systems and often to unequal treatment by employers and government service agencies. Social support networks serve as one means by which persons with disabilities can pursue social and economic inclusion. Without these networks, and without effective enforcement of robust non-discrimination laws, fewer safeguards exist to protect against a variety of human rights abuses, including trafficking in persons. Children and young adults with disabilities are especially vulnerable to the risks of human trafficking. Children with disabilities have been targeted by traffickers, for example, by being forced to beg because their disabilities—especially if highly visible—draw sympathy and charity from the public. In societies where children with disabilities are not expected to attend school, communities may be less likely to question why a disabled child is begging. All too often, young people with disabilities are regarded as undesirable and may even be subjected to trafficking by their own families. Children with less visible disabilities, such as cognitive or
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ESRC Research, Social Work and Social Care

ESRC Research, Social Work and Social Care

Items deposited in White Rose Research Online are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved unless indicated otherwise. They may be downloaded and/or printed for private study, or other acts as permitted by national copyright laws. The publisher or other rights holders may allow further reproduction and re-use of the full text version. This is indicated by the licence information on the White Rose Research Online record for the item.

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Application of Wireless Communication Tools in Managing Construction Projects

Application of Wireless Communication Tools in Managing Construction Projects

In the research work carried out by (Mohammed 2011) on Social media, it was identified that many UK construction firms are using social media to connect with their audience online however these communication channels are not being presently used to the most beneficial manner. They are mainly used for marketing purpose and for getting company‟s name out through advertising. Blogs for example would be valuable tool when conducting feasibility studies as it enable the client to gain options and suggestions from public regarding the proposed development. Sheridan(2010) in his study suggested the blogging would be of particular interest to contractors or client wanting to accentuate corporate social responsibility. Henry and Kato (2008) identified YouTube and skype as an excellent visual communication medium for use in construction , You Tube mainly enhances construction as it can provide training videos which in turn means cheaper, easier, faster learning tools for individuals on site. Visual learning has provided very effective in construction industries. There are some instances in the large projects where there is scope for a video link to be incorporated on construction website to watch buildings (for example) being erected from start to finish. Skype for example is used for video conference tool, for the people around the country or the world that can only chat through the skype tool. That has been founded by (Herring, Scheidt, Wright, Bonus, 2005) to be effective in construction, not only when it is used in this instance but also to interview the people from around the world. This has meant constructions companies save a great amount of time and money completing this process. This is widely used today in hiring the people around the world. Offsite project meetings can incur large travelling expenses; it is more time and cost effective to make internet video calls using wireless communication tools such as skype. Firms can use micro blogs like Twitter to post company updates and any one registered as the following the company updates and anyone registered as the following companies kept in loop applications for twitter are also available and can be used to circulate information that is put out Smartphone applications for twitter are also available and can be used to circulate information to staff members through text based posts of up to 140 characters knows as “Tweets” ( Mashable, 2011) this
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Euroforum - Europe day by day No. 23/78, 13 June 1978

Euroforum - Europe day by day No. 23/78, 13 June 1978

To identify the human and social costs which this logic entails, to research ways of reducing the social restrictions of work, to examine new ways of improving work and leisure time, the[r]

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The Effects of Social Networking on Nigerian Universities Research Works (A Case Study of University of Abuja)

The Effects of Social Networking on Nigerian Universities Research Works (A Case Study of University of Abuja)

order to be admitted to a given network of interest. In the course of filling the form, the applicant is expected to supply one’s bio-data. Today, there are thousands of SNSs. Some of them are more popular than others.. One of the SNS is Academia.edu. Leeder see Academia.edu as a SNS developed by Dr. Richard Price of Oxford University which does two things: Firstly, it shows academics around the world structured in a ‘tree’ format, displayed according to their departmental and institutional affiliations and secondly, it enables academics to see news on the latest research in their area – the latest people, papers and talks¹.
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The neglected paraphernalia of practice? Objects and artefacts in social work identity, practice and research

The neglected paraphernalia of practice? Objects and artefacts in social work identity, practice and research

This is not to suggest that objects do not play a part in social work. For much of the time though they are present in the background, unnoticed and only occasionally making their presence felt. Examples from my own practice include occasions when usually benign or useful objects become threatening, such as a home visit to a distressed and angry young person when I felt totally distracted by the pair of sewing scissors sitting on the coffee table; or present obstacles, as when one has to ask a parent to turn off the television without alienating them; or can be used to help make connections, for example, offering cigarettes to clients during prison visits. However, I have found little direct reference to objects and artefacts in social work in textbooks or practice guides used in the UK. There is material that considers how artefacts in the visual arts can be used in social work practice and education (e.g. photographs of refugees and asylum seekers, explored by Phillips and Bellinger 2011; and the work of Moxley, Feen-Calligan and Washington 2012). There are texts on communication with children that include suggestions about how to use toys, books and other objects in work with children (Lefevre, 2013; Tait and Wosu, 2013) and the notion of the ‘transitional object’ (Winnicott, 1953) has been influential in psycho-therapeutic approaches to social work with children and families. Some of the work by Ferguson referred to above makes reference to the way in which ‘things’ can influence interactions in practice (2011:62); and to the ways in which social workers may choose to use bedrooms when visiting children in their homes, in part so that they can interpret and make use of children’s ‘personal things’, such as toys, games, books, pictures etc., in understanding their worlds, and in developing relationships with them. (2014:4). A recent example considering the relevance of objects to the practice of social work is to be found in Houston’s guide on social work supervision (2015). This presents a model for reflective supervision, which addresses the impact of ‘five key domains of experience on social life’ (2015:8). Under the domain of culture, Houston makes passing reference to ‘material culture’, which he explains as ‘the range of artifacts [sic] which give our life meaning’ (2015:17). In suggestions for exploring its significance he concentrates on what he calls ‘symbolic culture’ - the ‘concepts’ which constitute social life, with a focus on communication through language and other signs, and on values, but is not explicit about the part played by objects and artefacts in this (2015:18).
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Health Factors Affecting Women of Color for Social Workers

Health Factors Affecting Women of Color for Social Workers

The major challenge faced by the health systems of all the Pacific territories is their need to provide services to a population scattered over many islands and many miles. Although the political relationships between the United States and selected island nations in the Pacific Ocean to the west of Hawaii differ, affiliation with the United States is mirrored in the similarities of the health care systems that have evolved. The location of these territories relative to Hawaii, Asia, and the mainland United States, how- ever, results in these islands that share Pacific territo- ries encountering similar challenges with respect to medical and public health staffing and facilities. In many of the territories, innovative methods have been developed to work around these challenges and meet the health care needs of the residents. 60,61,62,63
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