Family Drug Treatment Courts

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Sanctions in Family Drug Treatment Courts

Sanctions in Family Drug Treatment Courts

First, it appears that because jail is an effective sanction in criminal court, many professionals assume that it will be just as effective in FDTC Many of the earliest FDT[r]

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Tensions and contradictions in family court innovation with high risk parents:the place of family drug treatment courts in contemporary family justice

Tensions and contradictions in family court innovation with high risk parents:the place of family drug treatment courts in contemporary family justice

6 reunification is not feasible within a reasonable timeframe, then the FDTC seeks to develop a “permanency” plan that is in the best interest of the child and involves the parent and/or other family members if, and as feasible. The treatment element of the FDTC is a vital component and ensures better access to multi-disciplinary support, but it is time-limited. Hence the FDTC demonstrates that offering treatment to parents under the auspices of the court need not jeopardise the child’s needs for a permanent home, whether through reunification or removal, in order to maximise their prospects for a settled future. But the treatment is intensive to give a realistic prospect of addressing the challenges of parental recovery, using motivational approaches led by the judge, and providing regular review so as to foster a therapeutic relationship. In short, the aim of the FDTC is for the court to become an agent of change instead of a last resort that offers a fairer process. The cement that binds together the FDTC courts is their underpinning in therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ), a body of theory and practices that asserts the ‘right to a second chance’ for reasons of fairness, social justice and the ‘recognition of the personal dignity of all persons’(Honneth, 2001). In this way the stigma associated with parents who misuse drugs and alcohol is removed and the commonly reported problem of powerlessness is addressed as part of the treatment package (Harwin, Ryan & Kershaw, in press).
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Family Drug Treatment Courts BY JUDGE LEONARD P. EDWARDS AND JUDGE JAMES A. RAY A B S T R A C T

Family Drug Treatment Courts BY JUDGE LEONARD P. EDWARDS AND JUDGE JAMES A. RAY A B S T R A C T

vary from a few months to over a year. The relationship between the dependency process and the FDTC also differs from court to court. Some juvenile courts hear the dependency case simultaneously with the FDTC, while others hold separate hearings. In some, the same judge hears the dependency proceeding and the FDTC session, while in others different judges hear the depen- dency and FDTC sessions. Another structural variation involves whether there will be a pre-hearing administra- tive meeting before the FDTC calendar is called. Both of our FDTCs utilize this type of meeting. We have found that such meetings are useful to exchange information about the progress or lack of progress by each client, and to address general administrative issues. Moreover, by having representatives from all participants in the FDTC proceedings present at these meetings, there is no ethical issue regarding ex parte communications. C. Procedures and Operations
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Ethical Issues in the Family Drug Treatment Court

Ethical Issues in the Family Drug Treatment Court

4 S.D. Worcel et al., Family Drug Treatment Court Evaluation Final Report (NPC Research, 2007). 5 Judge Pach indicates that there may be problems with one judge hearing both the juvenile dependency and family drug treatment court dockets, but does not explore possible violations of the canons of judicial ethics. Nicolette Pach, An Overview of Operational Family Drug Treatment Courts, VI Drug Court Review, I, 67-121 at 104; In Ethical Considerations for Judges and Attorneys in Drug Court, Freeman-Wilson, Tuttle, and Weinstein mention the problem of ex parte communications, but have no discussion regarding the unique ethical issues facing judges in family drug treatment courts. K. Freeman-Wilson, R. Tuttle, & S. Weinstein, Ethical Considerations for Judges and Attorneys in Drug Court (National Drug Court Institute, 2001), at 9–10.
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Family/Dependency Drug Treatment Court Programs. Office of Problem- Solving Courts

Family/Dependency Drug Treatment Court Programs. Office of Problem- Solving Courts

Symptoms of ineffective practices regarding the court’s handling and disposition of substance abusing parents/guardians are generally reflected in (1) percentage of parents/guardians who are drug users; (2) relatively high rates of relapse; and (3) prior history of involvement with the juvenile dependency court system. If data is not readily available to ascertain the degree to which these factors are present in your jurisdiction, a sample of cases disposed of over the past two to three years may need to be taken. Generally Department of Social Services staff can be very helpful in compiling this sample.
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Position Paper: Drug Courts in Victoria: evidence & options

Position Paper: Drug Courts in Victoria: evidence & options

Family  Drug  Treatment  Courts  are  specialist  non‐adversarial,  problem  solving  courts  which  fulfill  these  recommendations.  They  operate  successfully  in  the  USA  and  the  UK  and  are  for  child  protection cases where one or more parents’ use of alcohol and other drugs is a key issue for child  safety  and  wellbeing.  They  have  a  central  goal  of  achieving  reunification  of  families,  or  earlier  permanency decisions if this fails. They provide parents with access to time limited intensive support,  treatment, and comprehensive services for the whole family.  
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A Review of the Family Drug Treatment Court Model ( FDAC)

A Review of the Family Drug Treatment Court Model ( FDAC)

Opening its doors in 2008, FDAC covers 6 London boroughs and supports around 50 families each year. The project is rooted in the idea of problem- solving justice, where courts use their authority to address the complex social issues that bring people before them. It is run by specially trained and dedicated judges who provide direct, ongoing supervision and support to parents in recovery. They work closely with a multi-disciplinary team who offer personalised care and treatment to families at risk. A recent evaluation report concluded that families going through FDAC are more likely to stay together, that parents are more likely to reduced their drug use, and that the children going through FDAC are less likely to experience further neglect and abuse than similar families passing through mainstream family courts. FDAC is one of the most successful examples of problem-solving court innovation in England and Wales in recent years. It has cleared four major hurdles at which many other well-designed and well-executed pilots fall. First, FDAC has successfully adapted an American problem-solving court model, carefully tailoring it to fit in with its specific London environment. Second, through an independent evaluation, it has generated clear and robust evidence of positive impact. Third, it has successfully transitioned from being a pilot underwritten by central government into a sustainable innovative part of local service delivery. Last, recognition of its value is leading to its replication: acknowledgement of its successes in the 2011 Family Justice Review which has led to further funding being offered to test its approach in other parts of England and Wales.
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ST. LOUIS DRUG COURTS

ST. LOUIS DRUG COURTS

adolescent drug issues and in January 2002, a Family Drug Court was created to address addicted parents to safeguard the children. In November 2003, the St. Louis Adult Drug Court broadened with an additional docket dedicated to the challenges of participants with co-occurring disorders of substance use and mental illness issues. In 2007, the St. Louis Adult Drug Court expanded the caseload to include a post plea docket to service individuals in their effort to recover from addiction outside prison walls. January 2010, the St. Louis Veterans Treatment Court was created in conjunction with the Veterans Administration to address the criminal charges, substance use and trauma issues of brave men and women who served this nation.
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MONOGRAPH. Family Dependency Treatment Courts: Addressing Child Abuse and Neglect Cases Using the Drug Court Model. Bureau of Justice Assistance

MONOGRAPH. Family Dependency Treatment Courts: Addressing Child Abuse and Neglect Cases Using the Drug Court Model. Bureau of Justice Assistance

The Health Start Partnership and CARES Parenting Program are promising parenting programs that grew out of one agency’s prenatal and pediatric services unit. The overall goal is to foster secure mother-infant attachments by encouraging responsive parenting. This is accomplished through by helping new or expectant mothers understand child development, form realistic expectations, learn to respond to infant cues, gain perspective on their own childhood issues and roles as a parent, and find and learn to use social supports. It is rooted in attachment theory and includes three essential components: home visits, support and education groups, and medical care. Risk factors that indicate a need for project services include a personal history of maltreatment or out-of-home placement; conflicts, including abuse by a partner or spouse; negative feelings about the pregnancy; limited support; social isolation; economic stress; unmet personal needs; and chaotic family systems.
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FAMILY DRUG TREATMENT COURT STANDARDS SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA

FAMILY DRUG TREATMENT COURT STANDARDS SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA

A number of family courts across the nation are successfully applying the drug court model to child welfare cases that involve child abuse or neglect and parental substance abuse. “Family Drug Courts” or “Family Dependency Treatment Courts,” which began in Reno, Nevada, in 1995, seek to do what is in the best interest of the family by providing a safe and secure environment for the child while intensively intervening and treating the parent’s substance abuse and other co-morbidity issues. The FDTC approach has resulted in better collaboration between agencies and better compliance with treatment and other family court orders necessary to improve child protection case outcomes. Through December 2007, the number of operational FDTCs has grown to 301 representing a 100% increase since December 2004. 1
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Best Practice Assessment and Treatment for Juvenile Drug Courts

Best Practice Assessment and Treatment for Juvenile Drug Courts

Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Programs Director, ULM Ouachita & Morehouse Parishes: Models for Change Project. Director.[r]

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Know. need to. Research Update on Adult Drug Courts. Effectiveness

Know. need to. Research Update on Adult Drug Courts. Effectiveness

In fiscally challenging times, there is always the pressure to do more with less. This raises the critical question of whether certain components of the Drug Court model can be dropped or the dosage decreased without eroding the effects. The “key components” of Drug Courts are hypoth- esized to include a multidisciplinary team approach, an ongoing schedule of judicial status hearings, weekly drug testing, contingent sanctions and incentives, and a stan- dardized regimen of substance abuse treatment (NADCP, 1997). Each of these hypothesized key components has been studied by researchers or evaluators to determine whether it is, in fact, necessary for effective results. The results have confirmed that fidelity to the full Drug Court model is necessary for optimum outcomes — assuming that the programs are treating their correct target popula- tion of high-risk, addicted drug offenders.
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Shared understandings? The interface between systemic psychotherapists and the family courts

Shared understandings? The interface between systemic psychotherapists and the family courts

Concerns about the quality of experts’ reports had been raised by the quashing in 2003 of Sally Clark’s conviction in 1999 for the murder of her baby sons, a conviction which had been largely based on the evidence of paediatrician Dr Roy Meadow. In his introduction to Bearing Good Witness (2006), the Chief Medical Officer Sir Liam Donaldson cites the Clark case, along with others, as being the context for “growing public unease about miscarriages of justice arising from the quality and validity of evidence given by medical expert witnesses in the courts”. He therefore sought to review “the use of medical expert witnesses within the family courts, and specifically in public law Children Act cases. It aims to identify the main problems with the current system and make proposals both to resolve them and to secure a sustainable supply of competent, quality-assured medical expert witnesses for care and supervision cases in the future.” A quantitative survey of clinicians was undertaken to assess their experience or otherwise of acting as an expert witness, and their attitudes towards undertaking this kind of work. The survey concluded that, although it had been set up in response to concerns about the quality of expert evidence, the problem was actually more of supply. Clinicians were deterred by lack of training, fear of finding the court process stressful and time
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The views of children and young people regarding media access
to family courts

The views of children and young people regarding media access to family courts

We are indebted to Kate Aldous for the illustrations used in the vignettes, and to the Principal Registry of the Family Division and Caroline Little for facilitating these. We are grateful to the advisory group: Sue Berelowitz (Chair and Deputy Children’s Commissioner for England); Carol Edwards (clinical psychologist, family therapist) children’s guardian and trainer, Joyce Plotnikoff (Director, Lexicon Ltd - consultancy, research services, researcher in civil, criminal and family jurisdictions); Dr Danya Glaser (Consultant Child and Family Psychiatrist – GOS/FJC); Jane Robey (Chief Executive, National Family Mediation); Caroline Little (Co-Chair, Association of Lawyers for Children); Jonathan Pearce (Director, Adoption UK); Alison Ronouf (Strategy and Development – CSF, LB Camden); Elena Fowler, (Chief Executive, National Youth Advocacy Service), Amy Smythe (NYAS, Youth Group); Mike
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Drug Courts Effects on Criminal Offending for Juveniles and Adults

Drug Courts Effects on Criminal Offending for Juveniles and Adults

Our finding that courts with violent offenders are less effective in reducing general recidivism seems to contradict findings from other drug court researchers who have found that violent offenders perform as well in drug courts as non-violent offenders (see e.g., Saum, Scarpitti, & Robbins, 2001). Closer inspection, however, reveals that findings like Saum et al.’s examine a different unit of analysis than our meta-analytic research. In essence, these researchers work concerns the recidivism of individuals with evidence of prior violence in comparison to non-violent drug court participants; whereas, our meta- analytic findings concern the reduction in recidivism between courts that allow violent drug court clients in comparison to other courts. These two questions are distinct and the answers to these questions need not match. As an example, consider the research of Saum et al. (2001), who as previously mentioned found that drug court participants with evidence of prior violence exhibited comparable reductions in recidivism as non-violent drug court participants. This study examines the individual-level of analysis. At the court evaluation-level of analysis, we find that the court evaluated in Saum et al’.s research (coded here under Scarpitti, Saum, and Robbins, 2001) had relatively small effects on recidivism in comparison to other drug court evaluations; in fact, this evaluation found that participants had more recidivism than non-participants. Rather than contradicting our finding, the results of Saum et al. buttress our conclusion that courts that accept violent offenders are less effective than other courts. In short, it is entirely possible that both sets of findings are correct; violent drug court participants do as well as non-violent participants in drug courts, and courts that accept violent offenders are less effective than other courts.
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Alcoholism and the ADA: Divergent Treatment by the Federal Courts

Alcoholism and the ADA: Divergent Treatment by the Federal Courts

Alcoholism and the ADA Divergent Treatment by the Federal Courts SMU Law Review Volume 54 | Issue 4 Article 13 2001 Alcoholism and the ADA Divergent Treatment by the Federal Courts Carrie A Thornton F[.]

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Practice Guidance: McKenzie Friends (Civil and Family Courts)

Practice Guidance: McKenzie Friends (Civil and Family Courts)

19) Courts should be slow to grant any application from a litigant for a right of audience or a right to conduct litigation to any lay person, including a MF. This is because a person exercising such rights must ordinarily be properly trained, be under professional discipline (including an obligation to insure against liability for negligence) and be subject to an overriding duty to the court. These requirements are necessary for the protection of all parties to litigation and are essential to the proper administration of justice.

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Executive Summary: National Survey of Veterans Treatment Courts

Executive Summary: National Survey of Veterans Treatment Courts

Means of supervision utilized are displayed in Table 16. Traditional means of supervision (i.e. drug testing and reporting to an agency such as probation) were reported by all or nearly all VTCs. Although it was reported by nearly all VTCs, it was expected that all VTCs would verify treatment attendance. However, it appears that drug testing slightly surpasses treatment attendance as the main supervision method. Mentoring appears to be utilized as a means of supervision by very few VTCs (3%). This could be related to the fact that only 11% require participant to meet with mentors, and VTC program creators may want mentors to function solely as resources and support figures and not as supervisors.
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Co-Parenting Communication Guide by the Arizona Chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts

Co-Parenting Communication Guide by the Arizona Chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts

The parent who receives medical information or instructions is responsible for sharing with the other parent at least the following information:. Diagnosis[r]

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Family Guide to Alcoholism and Drug Addiction

Family Guide to Alcoholism and Drug Addiction

In some cases, the 'softly-softly' approach will be enough to get your child to admit to the problem and agree to get help. If this doesn't work, you are going to need to give an ultimatum. This means outlining the penalties for continuance with the behaviour. You should only give an ultimatum if you are prepared to follow it through. Your family can also stage an intervention in order to pressurise your child into entering rehab. Don't believe the myth that a person has to willing to enter rehab in order for it to be effective - there are plenty of stories of young people who went to rehab reluctantly but had a change of heart while they were there.
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