Fashion Retailing

Top PDF Fashion Retailing:

Labour supply and skills demands in fashion retailing

Labour supply and skills demands in fashion retailing

There were also several noteworthy differences in the findings from the two different contexts with regard to some aspects of recruitment and selection, most notably the use of job centres. Employers in the broader Glasgow survey were 70 per cent more likely to report the use of job centres than their Manchester counterparts. This difference may be as a result of the skills which are being sought at the point of recruitment and selection, as many job centre recruits are from the unemployed or less privileged backgrounds. Employers may see any requirement for style and cultural capital as more forthcoming in students or workers from middle class backgrounds, and style was clearly an important factor in these establishments. This requirement for style may explain the substantially lower use of job centres among the more focused Manchester retail sub-sector. On the issue of skills shortages, Glasgow employers experienced more problems than Manchester employers in terms of whether applicants had the required interpersonal and social skills, rather than finding those who had the necessary technical skills. Manchester employers had less difficulty attracting the desired interpersonal and aesthetic skills, image or style. As we have previously argued the explanation for this finding could lie in the greater cachet ascribed to fashion retailing compared to other areas of retailing (Walls, 2008).
Show more

19 Read more

Skill requirements in retail work : the case of high-end fashion retailing

Skill requirements in retail work : the case of high-end fashion retailing

5 The article begins by briefly considering the nature of retail work, highlighting the potential for variability within such work. The discussion then considers how skill may be conceptualised, outlining how Cockburn’s typology may be applied to high-end fashion retailing. It is recognised that high-end fashion retail employees must have an appropriate mix of both soft and hard elements of skill. For example, having the required aesthetic and emotional labour (Hochschild, 1983; Nickson et al., 2001; 2005) to ensure the ‘right’ look and the ability to enact high quality customer service needs to co-exist with harder, technical elements, such as having and utilising extensive product knowledge. This mix of skills allows high-end fashion retailers to offer a more personalised service in which employees ‘sell’, not just serve (Pettinger, 2004). The article reports data from 37 interviews with managers, supervisors and employees in 15 fashion retail outlets. The results indicate that high-end fashion retail work contains recognisable elements of skill and that workers see themselves as distinct, constructing their work as being more skilled than other retail workers. These factors do not, however, mean that these jobs attract an appropriate level of reward for the skill level. The article concludes by considering the implications of these findings for views about the skills content of retail work.
Show more

35 Read more

An overview about fashion retailing sector: UK versus Spain

An overview about fashion retailing sector: UK versus Spain

Fernie et al. (1998) agree with Dawson (1994) on the reasons why fashion retailers are more likely to be successful internationally compared to other retailing sectors: small format requiring limited capital and management set up costs; ease of entry and exit compared to manufacturing; single brand internationalisation format enables; more suited to franchising; and economies of replication. On the other hand, Doherty (2000) conclusions on entry mode strategy in international fashion retailing are that entry mode strategy emerges over time as a result of a combination of historical, experiential, financial, opportunistic, strategic and company-specific factors; and in the case of UK fashion retailers, franchising has emerged as the major entry mode and looks like continuing to do so into the future, contrary to Burt (1993) opinion that as retailers become experienced will move to higher risk modes, such as acquisition or organic growth.
Show more

8 Read more

Omnichannel fashion retailing: examining the customer decision-making journey

Omnichannel fashion retailing: examining the customer decision-making journey

Saraneva and S€a€aksj€arvi (2008). The results shed light on potentially weak stages of the omnichannel customer decision- making journey as priority areas for retailer improvement and correlate with operations literature on omnichannel. Excitement was expressed at the outset of the inspiration stage with shoppers commencing their omnichannel journey with thoughts of seeking out “newness” and feeling open to new ideas and being in an exploratory frame of mind. “I think I’m quite excited and quite exploratory. Like I’m quite open to lots of ideas” (In). This finding was supported by the literature that suggests fashion information can stimulate excitement (McCormick and Livett, 2012; Rowley, 2009). The research and comparison stage, meanwhile, was filled with mixed emotions which were weighted towards the negative. Positive emotions included love and enjoyment reinforced the passion high-involvement customers possess towards fashion. “Yeah that’s just what I enjoy doing. I enjoy the information as well. I wouldn’t really see that as like searching for information I would see that more as enjoyment” (In). Negative affective experiences included: stress, annoyance, disappointment and fatigue among others. The feelings of fatigue correlate with Hollebeek (2011) who discussed that excessive brand engagement levels can lead to consumer fatigue. As journey progressed towards evaluation emotions were found to be more balanced as a result of shoppers finding a desired item with feelings of positivity and happiness. “When I went in store, found this one and tried it on I fell in love with it straight away and so it made me feel positive” (In). But disappointment and stress would also occur as a result of trying-on and evaluating garments in the store channel. Therefore, reflecting the reality of shopping when expectations were not met. Purchase was a an experience whereby participants recounted feelings of positivity, gratification and happiness at making a purchase. “I think I just like the instant gratification. It’s done, I’ve got it” (Fg). The delivery stage was filled with emotional highs and lows as participants noted the lag experienced between purchasing and receiving a product, therefore highlighting the lack of immediate gratification which this segment of consumers so craves. Initially, participants recounted positive emotions such as feeling happy; however, feelings of happiness were attributed to the evaluation of the product rather than the delivery itself. Likewise, participants explained that they were excited “You can see it coming to you a bit and it gives you that excitement” (Fg). Yet these feelings wore off and discussion was focused on feelings of annoyance and frustration with the delivery experience. However, it was the returns experience which created the most angst among all the journey stages. Customers experienced annoyance, stress and even hate. These negative feelings were associated with
Show more

21 Read more

Consumer Buying behaviour in Fashion Retailing: Empirical Evidencies

Consumer Buying behaviour in Fashion Retailing: Empirical Evidencies

411 women. These factors are: publicity in fashion magazines, women’s magazines, catalogues, publicity at major events, consumer’s economical situation, the price of the pieces of clothing and if there is sales promotion. Thus, after analyzing the results of tables 1 and 2, we may say that hypothesis is not rejected (there are differences in consumer buying behaviour according to gender), i. e., there are statistically significant differences on the perception of the following factors that exert influence upon the decision of buying clothing depending if it is a woman or a man: (i) publicity in fashion magazines; (ii) women’s magazines; (iii) publicity in catalogues; (iv) outdoors publicity; (v) publicity at major events; (vi) consumer’s economical situation; (vii) if there is sales promotion. These difference are also statistically significant in what concerns the following reasons pointed out by the consumer when he buys a certain piece of clothing, depending if it is a man or a woman: (i) to combine with the wardrobe; (ii) because that brand is linked to a certain status.
Show more

15 Read more

Fashion retailing – past, present and future

Fashion retailing – past, present and future

80 retailers, there is a potential to encourage up selling and cross selling of products, by offering outfit inspiration online; some retailers already have complete the look or suggestions which encourage multiple purchases (McCormick and Livett, 2012). Having more product information via apps or on a website when customers are in store, may inspire consumer to look for additional products (Magrath and McCormick, 2013). If customers have to login in order to receive wifi, retailers will be able to capture customers’ details, with the consumers consent, and provide a more precise tool to target customers. Mobiles have the ability to enhance the in store experience by allowing retailers to personalise offers whilst customers are at the retail location. The challenge for retailers is to ensure that it is easy to log in to the wifi. Location-based promotions via mobiles such as special offers or discounts may also encourage customers to spend more time in the store and it would also be a good way for fashion retailers to promote new collections or brands. The cons are of course if consumers can compare prices they may choose to buy the products from another retailer if they find it online cheaper. Verdict (2013) found that 38% of online shoppers research goods in store before completing the transaction online. This trend is known as ‘showrooming’, with consumers looking at products in the physical store, then going online to compare prices and purchasing it elsewhere. For retailers such as John Lewis, whose mission statement since 1925 has been founded on a price promise “never knowingly undersold”, many would believe that the internet would be seen as a threat, as customers could compare products whilst in store. John Lewis however have embraced multichannel retailing and e-commerce and extended this strategy online which had a potential risk as it increases visibility of price differences from the high street, however sales figures significantly increased and John Lewis has won many retail awards over the past few years. By allowing customers to access free wifi in store John Lewis are able to try to influence customers to purchase by encouraging them to access product information, view ratings and reviews as well as comparing prices; reinforcing their price matching promise, making customers feel confident shopping in the knowledge that they cannot find a similar product with same price, service and quality on the high street.
Show more

136 Read more

Conceptualizing Service Quality in Multichannel Fashion Retailing

Conceptualizing Service Quality in Multichannel Fashion Retailing

reading Sousa and Voss’ (2006) fundamental journal article ‘Service quality in multichannel services employing virtual channels’ in 2015, I took part in an email conversation with Professor Rui Soucasaux Sousa, who had co-authored the article. Prof Sousa confirmed that research into multichannel service quality was still in its early stages. Sousa and Voss (2006) were the first to introduce ‘integration quality’ as a link between ‘virtual’ and ‘physical quality’. This concept particularly seized my attention because their approach also helped me to understand what was missing in practice, and what I could experience in multichannel retailing companies. At the time when I began my study, German multichannel retailing companies tended to operate their channels independently, without paying much intention to integrating them. Moreover, different managers were responsible for online and offline channels. Potentially, these managers were working to different guidelines and targets. This meant that the channels were not fully integrated. In some cases, the prices, layouts or sales campaigns of each channel were different. Furthermore, the general knowledge of in-store sales people about the online channel could be considered insufficient and not customer-facing. Thus, the overall customer experience with retailing companies was not coherent amongst the channels.
Show more

235 Read more

FAST RETAILING DREAM

FAST RETAILING DREAM

Opening roughly double the current number of stores in FY2010. 100-store network very soon to become No.1 brand position.. 21 Paris Global Flagship. A showcase to the world. Show the ver[r]

15 Read more

The object of fashion : methodological approaches to the history of fashion

The object of fashion : methodological approaches to the history of fashion

Two problems remain to discuss in conclusion. First, what are the advantages of an approach combining object, theory and historical research? Objects should not be used as mere illustrations to pre-established interpretations. On the con- trary, artefacts should be used to propose inter- pretive hypotheses that documents or other written and visual sources are unable to provide. Let me give an example from my own research on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century shoes. The analysis of French shoes from the early nineteenth century reveals that their international success was not only the result of their fashion- ability but also of their manufacture, with uppers made of two pieces instead of three. This allowed quicker and cheaper production than in the other European countries. Written sources report, through numbers and written words, the success of French shoes, and the fashion literature of the period reports how these French shoes were the latest fashion. However, only the analysis of the shoes themselves provides evidence of an important competitive advantage in the mode of production. 17
Show more

10 Read more

Fashion History Fashion Marketing Marketing. Lesson Plan

Fashion History Fashion Marketing Marketing. Lesson Plan

(B) demonstrate knowledge of fashion history and how it relates to today's fashions (C) distinguish among fashion terms such as fashion, style, and design.. (D) list major environmental[r]

8 Read more

Fashion blogs: a study on how consumers’ attitude to fashion is influenced through fashion blog usage.

Fashion blogs: a study on how consumers’ attitude to fashion is influenced through fashion blog usage.

87 this paper for example connected to the blog. One possibility can be to test the “boxes” relative importance against each other, like for example fashion blogger characteristics and content and layout of the blog. Another can be to test all the factors connected to the blog; expertise, authenticity, authority, pictures and text, and whether the blog is structured to find out it relative importance. Whether the blog is frequently updated is something that should be tested under a period of time, so I will not take into the consideration here. There should be an experimental group where the independent variables are manipulated and a control group that are not exposed to manipulations. All the other factors should be similar except the factor that is being tested. What can be done to test for example expertise is to make a blog that have all factors including expertise which are exposed to the control group, and another that does not have expertise, but all the other factors exposed to the experimental group. The respondents evaluates those with expertise as those that are mentioned in the media, those that work with fashion on the side or write about both high and low end fashion brand; mix fashion from different sources and have several references. Also the factors connected to the layout and content can contribute to strengthen the perception of expertise, thus this implies that these factors should be emphasized when testing for expertise. To test all the fashion blogger characteristics six groups of for example 50 each should be chosen randomly. Three of the groups are control groups not exposed to manipulations, but the other three groups are manipulated on the three different characteristics expertise, authenticity and authority like proposed earlier. To get to know what the respondents think about the blog they are asked different questions and this is formed like a questionnaire. All respondents are asked the same questions, but in the design it is important not directly ask about the expertise, authenticity and authority as it might reveal to the respondents what they are supposed to look for. With a high probability of the result representing the reality (Saunders et al, 2007) a quantitative experimental design can be helpful in testing the causal effects of the independent variables and seeing the relative importance of these variables.
Show more

174 Read more

Global Grocery Retailing

Global Grocery Retailing

This   Carrefour   model   isn’t   especially   complex:   cutting   prices   and   tailoring   ranges   to   market   are   basic   retailing.   Yet   it’s   a   model   certain   retailers   can   take   some   time   to   adopt   when   they   are   losing   share   in   price-­‐sensitive  markets.  In  the  UK,  Tesco,  for  instance,  also  embarked  on  fancy  superstore  conversions  to   halt   a   fall   in   traffic.   But   having   sacked   the   CEO   who   came   up   with   that   strategy,   Tesco,   too,   is   now   concentrating  on  sharpening  prices  and  it  has  shifted  closer  to  an  everyday-­‐low-­‐price  position.  
Show more

39 Read more

New Online Retailing

New Online Retailing

2.1 Basic Principles of New Online Retailing 19 2.1.1 Technological Principles of Online Retailing 19 2.1.2 Media-Specific Fundamentals 25 2.1.3 Company-Specific Groundwork for Online Co[r]

6 Read more

Web Retailing in India

Web Retailing in India

Once a particular product has been found on the website of the seller, most online retailers use shopping cart software to allow the consumer to accumulate multiple items an[r]

8 Read more

The Spread Fashion: an Explorative Research of Italian Fashion Blog

The Spread Fashion: an Explorative Research of Italian Fashion Blog

The most followed fashion bloggers become a guide for consumers, influencing their taste and thus contributing to whether or not a brand or a product achieves commercial success. The credibility, which is accorded by consumers to the advice of the more celebrated fashion bloggers, relies on a clear mechanism of trust. On one hand, readers appreciate the personal style of the blogger and recognize its originality; on the other hand, they trust the blogger’s correctness and believe his/her suggestions to be independent of any conditioning by the fashion companies. In this way, it is assumed that fashion bloggers can lead their readers into the world of fashion helping them to acquire knowledge and perspectives on trends and lifestyles. However, as numerous studies have highlighted (Halvorsen et al., 2013; Pedroni, 2015), in FBs the boundary between the expression of a blogger’s personal taste in clothing and brand promotion is rather blurry. Describing the tendency to display in blog posts the daily outfit Halvorsen et al. (2013: 220) write: ‘[…] the fashion blogger presents a picture of their outfit, describing it in detail, from the brand to the price of the garment. Through their text, the blogger is indeed advertising the product or brand. The bloggers did not consider this advertising. The practice is utilized to demonstrate to readers the bloggers’ own sense of style and fashion […]. “Outfit of the day” demonstrates how commercial content is very much integrated into the blog content’.
Show more

20 Read more

Omni-Channel Retailing

Omni-Channel Retailing

One of the main challenges for retailers going forward is that the new supply chain has to con- sider stores not only as destinations for invento- ry, but also as potential sources to a[r]

8 Read more

Fashion Promotion and Retailing

Fashion Promotion and Retailing

Retailers will offer more unique products of higher quality, instead of overusing the term sale. They will market to tiny niches of specifi c customers identifi ed by credit card purchases and other database information. Niche retailing is dividing the total consumer market into narrow target markets with specifi c tastes or lifestyles. There is less competition in niche markets, but also fewer customers. By clearly understanding and focusing on their target customers, niche retailers can operate with less stock, make more sales, and gain higher profi ts. In this way, small retailers will complement mass merchandisers rather than compete against them. They will have to stay fl exible and creative to fi l observed gaps with innovative merchandising methods.
Show more

9 Read more

ELECTRICITY RETAILING IN NORWAY

ELECTRICITY RETAILING IN NORWAY

As a further test of robustness, we have undertaken regressions based on the model reported in the main text with more variables. We have constructed a number of variables in order to see if retailers tend to increase their prices by more or less than the (expected) change in the underlying wholesale price. The “Trend-up” variable equals the two-week futures price described above multiplied by a dummy, where the dummy is equal to 1 if both the four-week futures price exceeds the two-week future and the two-week futures price exceeds the spot price; this variable therefore aims at measuring to what extent pricing strategies are affected by the fact that underlying wholesale prices are on an upward trend. The “Trend-down” variable is constructed in a corresponding fashion. The “Convex” variable equals the two-week futures price multiplied by a dummy that equals 1 if the difference between the four-week futures price and the two-week futures price is greater than the difference between two-week futures price and the spot price; this variable therefore aims at measuring to what extent pricing strategies are affected by the fact that the rise in underlying wholesale prices is accelerating. The “Concave” variable is constructed in a corresponding fashion. We do no report results of estimations that include these variables here since we could not reject the hypothesis that these coefficients are zero at a 5 percent significance level. The only coefficients that were significantly different from zero at a 5 percent level were the Convex variable for Fjordkraft and Gudbrandsdal.
Show more

42 Read more

Recycled Fashion

Recycled Fashion

Remanufacturing converts waste into a resource providing new business activities, generating jobs and finance, and diverts waste from landfill resulting in significant reduction of energy use and carbon emissions and is currently practiced in various industries such as automotive and aerospace. Kumar and Malegeant (2006) note that a major problem with remanufacturing is the uncertainty in timing, quality and quantity of returns, balancing returns with demand, disassembly, reverse logistics, materials matching requirements, routing uncertainty, and processing time uncertainty. Sundin (2004) proposed a Remanufacturing Property Matrix (RemPro) which relates all steps in generic remanufacturing process (inspection, cleaning, dissambley, storage, reprocess, reassembly and testing) with the preferable product properties (ease of verification, access, handling, separation, securing, alignment, stacking, wear resistance). Building on this and previous research and literature regarding the fashion supply chain and design process (Frings, 1991, Stecker, 1996, Sinha 2000, Burns and Bryant, 2001, Jones, 2005, McKelvey et al 2008), we considered the issues regarding remanufacturing fashion in the light of the literature reviewed to date, some of which we present below:
Show more

15 Read more

Fashion in Jeopardy

Fashion in Jeopardy

The different examples from the student project demonstrate some good and weak examples of ‘Make do and Mend’ in a fashion context. This, compared with their research into historical garments enhanced their understanding of how fashion can be influenced by social change, through a live experience. The students were also able to compare their efforts to the high fashion examples suggested by Vogue magazine, by developing their own thrifty approach to creating fashionable garments. As one student remarked: “This exercise not only made us empathise with the concept of ‘Make do and Mend’ but it made us aware that innovative fashion design ideas can be developed from this way of working” (Phillips, 2009, personal interview). (SLIDE 28) Ultimately the project highlighted that developing design ideas through recycling, could be instant and fun and in turn influence fashion trends. The students who laboured over the process often produced more contrived and overworked ideas. Those who worked quickly produced simpler and fresher results.
Show more

15 Read more

Show all 1283 documents...