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Are stress hormone levels a good proxy of foraging success? An experiment
with King Penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus

Are stress hormone levels a good proxy of foraging success? An experiment with King Penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus

2008). Because of this correlation between body condition and CORT levels, it is likely that the relationship linking food availability and baseline CORT levels in seabirds is functionally regulated by two major energy-related variables: (1) depletion of energy reserves through fasting and (2) energy acquisition through foraging and food intake. Although fasting is well known to result in increased CORT secretion (Cherel et al., 1988; Lynn et al., 2003; Angelier et al., 2007a; Groscolas et al., 2008), the relationship between energy acquisition and CORT secretion remains poorly understood in wild birds. In this study, our objective is to better understand whether and how the ability of wild birds to extract food and energy from the environment can functionally affect their baseline CORT levels. Empirical evidence suggests that individual CORT levels could be reduced in response to food intake and foraging success, and it has recently been reported that baseline CORT levels decrease during foraging in wild vertebrates (Woodley et al., 2003; Cockrem et al., 2006; Angelier et al., 2007b; Angelier et al., 2008). However, the functional cause of this decrease remains unclear because food supplementation experiments have demonstrated that an increase in food availability or food intake is not always related to a reduction in CORT levels in wild birds (Lanctot et al., 2003; Schoech et al., 2004; Schoech et al., 2007; Bridge et al., 2009). Therefore, empirical and experimental studies suggest that the link between food availability, food intake and CORT levels is complex (Angelier et al., 2008; Schoech et al., 2009), and decreases in individual CORT levels during a foraging trip may, potentially, be related to other intrinsic and environmental factors [such as disturbance, social interaction or endogenous hormonal cycles (Breuner et al., 1999; Creel, 2001; Müller et al., 2006)] which vary over a foraging trip.

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Five decades on: use of historical weaning size data reveals that a decrease in maternal foraging success underpins the long term decline in population of southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina)

Five decades on: use of historical weaning size data reveals that a decrease in maternal foraging success underpins the long term decline in population of southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina)

The mean STL of Macquarie Island elephant seal pups at weaning decreased by 3cm between the 1950s and 1990s, concurrent with the observed population decline. This finding supports the hypothesis that reductions in the foraging success of breeding females from Macquarie Island, in response to reductions in foraging conditions, are ultimately responsible for the pop- ulation decline, as females allocate fewer resources to their pups, resulting in fewer surviving until breeding age. Even though this is a small change, the overall rate of decline for the Mac- quarie Island population of breeding females is less than 1% per annum. A very small but long-term change in first year survival (through a small change in weaning size) is therefore sufficient to generate this insidious rate of decline [38]. This also accords with a previous study at Marion Island which found that mean weaning mass was smaller than the long-term average during a period of population decline, with a sudden reversal in the growth rate of the popula- tion preceded by an increase in mean weaning mass [11].

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Shifts in foraging behavior of wintering Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) in three different habitats at Shengjin Lake, China

Shifts in foraging behavior of wintering Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) in three different habitats at Shengjin Lake, China

Candidate models were made up of all single-variable models and additive models. The null model contained only the intercept and had no interactions, because there is no strong ecological explanation. For all models, the number of parameters (k) included intercept and variance estimates. Covariance structures for repeated measures included one parameter (k) for all models except for the null model. The foraging success rate may have included repeated observations of an individual crane. We allowed individual cranes to be random factors in order to con- trol for repeated measurements. In the final model, we only included the habitat types (meadow, mudflat, paddy field), age (adult, juvenile), family size (2, 3 or 4 mem- bers), time of the day (morning, noon, afternoon), win- ter stage (early winter, mid-winter, or late winter), date and density. We used the method of information theory to guide the selection of the model and Akaike’s Infor- mation Criterion (AIC) to calculate the value of each model. We used the relative importance of each AIC and their weight, w i (i = 1, … 16) for drawing inferences from

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Echolocation behaviour and prey capture success in foraging bats: laboratory and field experiments on Myotis daubentonii

Echolocation behaviour and prey capture success in foraging bats: laboratory and field experiments on Myotis daubentonii

Recent studies of habitat use by bats have used measures of terminal buzz rate as indicators of foraging success (e.g. Vaughan et al., 1996, 1997). However, just because a bat produces a feeding buzz does not mean that it was successful in capturing the prey. If successful captures could be discriminated reliably from unsuccessful ones, then measures of feeding rates could be better estimated, increasing their value for studies in energetics and conservation. The present study shows that estimates of successful and unsuccessful prey-capture rates can be improved, although more so in the laboratory than in the field. Nevertheless, capture success in the field could be identified with statistical significance in multivariate analysis. The most consistent factor affected by successful prey capture was a reduction in the repetition rate of pulses after the terminal buzz.

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Getting older, getting smarter: ontogeny of foraging behaviour in the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata

Getting older, getting smarter: ontogeny of foraging behaviour in the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata

Desert ants and honey bees start foraging when they are a few days old, and subsequently increase their foraging effort and the amount of foraged food. This could be an optimal strategy for scavenger/gatherer animals inhabiting landscapes with fewer features. However, animals inhabiting cluttered landscapes, especially predatory animals, may require substantial familiarity with foraging landscapes to forage efficiently. They may acquire such spatial familiarity with increasing age/experience, and eventually reduce their foraging effort without compromising on foraging success/efficiency. To check whether this holds for the individually foraging predatory tropical paper-wasp Ropalidia marginata, we recorded the number and duration of all foraging trips, the identity of foraged materials, and the directions of outbound and inbound flights (with respect to the nest) of known-age wasps for three consecutive days from three naturally occurring colonies; thus, we measured behavioural profiles of wasps of various ages, and not from the same wasp throughout its lifespan. Wasps increased their foraging duration rapidly until about 4 weeks of age, during which they rarely brought food, although some wasps brought building material and water. Thereafter, their foraging duration started decreasing. Nevertheless, their foraging success/efficiency in bringing food kept on increasing. With age, wasps developed individual directional preferences for outbound and inbound flights, indicating the development of spatial memory for rewarding sites. Also, the angular difference between their outbound and subsequent inbound flights gradually increased, indicating older wasps may have followed tortuous foraging routes. High investment in early life to acquire familiarity with foraging landscapes and using that later to perform efficient foraging could be an optimal strategy for individually foraging animals inhabiting feature-rich landscapes.

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Linking northern fur seal behavior with prey distributions: the impact of temporal mismatch between predator studies and prey surveys

Linking northern fur seal behavior with prey distributions: the impact of temporal mismatch between predator studies and prey surveys

The one behavioral metric that appears to be consist- ently related to foraging behavior for marine preda- tors, and that we found to be insignificant, is residence time in an area (for example, [42, 43]). Marine preda- tors feeding on patchily distributed prey can increase foraging success by employing area-restricted search patterns in response to prey encounter [44–46]. This area-restricted search behavior should increase reten- tion within a grid cell if animals are successfully forag- ing. For example, the swimming paths of basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus) became more convoluted as prey density increased, resulting in sharks spending the great- est amount of time in the highest density prey patches [1]. Bailey and Thompson [44] showed that bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) concentrated search effort in areas where feeding occurred compared to their movements throughout the rest of the study region. For northern fur seals, grid residence time was only signifi- cantly related to prey abundance at the longest tempo- ral scale, which was a weak negative relationship. It has been previously suggested that northern fur seals forage while transiting, which may limit the number or intensity of area-restricted search periods during foraging trips, reducing residency times [47, 48]. In addition, other fur seal behaviors not related to feeding, such as resting and grooming, may impact time in a grid cell regardless of prey abundance. Finally, it is important to consider the constraints faced by female northern fur seals during the reproductive season, which may shape how fur seals allo- cate their time at sea. Trip durations are limited by the fasting duration of the dependent pup waiting onshore [23, 24, 49]. Therefore, if grids with higher densities of prey are distributed away from the rookery, females must spend a larger proportion of their time traveling, which may reduce the amount of time available to forage before needing to return to the rookery. To examine the impacts Fig. 2 Relationship between walleye pollock abundance (NUMCPUE,

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Ocean climate and seal condition

Ocean climate and seal condition

returns to sea in February for a 2 1/2 month post-partum bout of foraging to recover the one third of the body mass lost during nursing and begin the next pregnancy [10,19]. Milk energy transferred to the pup varies with its sex and the age, mass, blubber reserves and overall condition of the mother [11]. By maternal condition, we mean the total body energy available to the female at the time of parturition. On average, 48.0 ± 3.0% (3490 ± 490 MJ) of a female's body reserves is depleted during lactation. The size and blubber reserves obtained by the female during her biannual foraging migrations determine the level of reproductive expenditure in the subsequent breeding cycle. Pup weight at birth and weaning is correlated posi- tively with the mother's age and mass [19]. Male pups are about 8% heavier than females at birth and at weaning [20], suggesting that males require more maternal energy than female pups. Pregnant females are capital breeders that store energy in blubber laid down over months of continuous foraging at sea and expend much of this energy later in reproduction [21]. Acquisition of insuffi- cient body reserves owing to low foraging success directly impacts reproductive expenditure resulting in low wean- ing weight of pups [11]. Additional data supporting these points are reported in studies of southern elephant seals [13,22].

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Foraging robots

Foraging robots

This article therefore focusses on describing and defining the principles of robot foraging. The majority of examples will necessarily be of laboratory systems not aimed at solving real-world applications but designed to model, illuminate and demonstrate those principles. The article proceeds as follows. Section 3 describes an abstract model of robot foraging, using a finite state machine (FSM) description to define the discrete sub-tasks, or states, that constitute foraging. The FSM method will be used throughout this article. The section then develops a taxonomy of robot foraging. Section 4 describes the essential design features that are a requirement of any foraging robot, whether operating singly or in a multi-robot team, and the technologies currently available to implement those features; the section then outlines a number of examples of single- robot foraging, including robots that are commercially available. Section 5 then describes the development and state-of-the-art in multi-robot (collective) foraging; strategies for cooperation are described including information sharing, cooperative transport and division of labour (task allocation), the section then reviews approaches to the mathematical modelling of multi-robot foraging. The article concludes in section 6 with a discussion of future directions in robot foraging and an outline of the technical challenges that remain to be solved.

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18. Foraging behavior of the giant honey bee, Apis dorsata F. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) at Peshawar District of Pakistan

18. Foraging behavior of the giant honey bee, Apis dorsata F. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) at Peshawar District of Pakistan

Data on foraging behavior/ pattern of honeybees on selected crop at different time intervals revealed that 5 days after initiation of flowers on the crop, it was found that individuals (4.37) of A. dorsata were most active during noon at 1600 hr, which was followed by second peak (3.62) of foraging activities at 1200 hrs. Lowest (1.37) foraging activity was found at 1800 hrs of the day (Table 1). After an interval of 10 days of 5 percent blooming on the crop, inhabitants of A. dorsata constituted maximum (4.75) density at 1600 hr, which was followed by mean frequency of 4.12 at 1200 noon. Minimum foraging activities of honeybee recorded with 1.75 bee visitors at 0800 hrs. 15 th day after flowering, the foraging activity of A. dorsata started at 0800 hr with 2.87 bees/m 2 /5min. population density of honeybee recorded on its peak (5.37) at 1600 hr. Second peak foraging of bee visitors observed with average population of 4.50 at 1200 noon. Minimum strength was recorded with 2.25 bees at

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Adaptive foraging behaviour and impact on longevity of an omnivorous insect in response to the extreme temperature fluctuation events associated with climate change

Adaptive foraging behaviour and impact on longevity of an omnivorous insect in response to the extreme temperature fluctuation events associated with climate change

Biological control is defined as the human introduction or enhancement of natural enemies of pest species in an attempt to restore a balance (Gullan and Cranston 2005). These natural enemies are biological control agents and can ge any predator, parasitoid or pathogen that can potentially influence the pest’s abundance and/or dynamics (Coppel and Mertins 1977, Bugg et al. 1987, Pickett and Bugg 1998). For effective utilization of a biological control agent, there must be a solid understanding of its foraging behaviour (DeBach and Rosen 1991). Historically, it was believed that the best practice of biological control was the classical application which introduces specialist natural enemies, with the hope that they become permanently established (Gullan and Cranston 2005). The use of generalist predators as biological control agents was once thought to be a poor choice, more recently however, they have become a common and successful method, especially in temporary agroecosystems (Symondson et al. 2002). Generalist predators may be better suited as biological control agents because they are able to persist through times of target prey scarcity by feeding on alternative prey (Bugg et al. 1987, Eubanks and Denno 1999, Symondson et al. 2002). Predatory Heteroptera have received a lot of attention as important and useful biological control agents (Coll and Ruberson 1998).

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Analysis of adaptive foraging in an intraguild predation system

Analysis of adaptive foraging in an intraguild predation system

An intraguild predation (IGP) system with adaptive foraging behavior was analyzed using a simple mathematical model. The main aim was to explore how the adaptive behavior affects species interactions as well as how such interactions derived from adap- tive behavior affect community stability. The focal system contained top predators, in- termediate predators, and basal prey. Intermediate predators exhibit antipredator be- havior and balance costs (e.g., perceived predation risk) and benefits (e.g. resource in- take) to determine their foraging effort. Density-dependent foraging behavior with the unique connectance of the IGP food web created unusual species interactions. Notably, increased prey density can transmit negative indirect effects to top predators while in- creased top predator density transmits positive indirect effects to prey population. The nature of these interactions is density-dependent. The results suggest that both IGP (as opposed to linear food chain) and adaptive foraging behaviors may strongly influence community dynamics due to emergent interactions among direct effects and indirect effects. Furthermore, the adaptive foraging of intermediate predators may stabilize the community as a whole.

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Foraging

Foraging

may or not have approximated to orange marmalade (fresh oranges only occasionally came through from America and were restricted to children) but could scarcely have been less popular than some of the manufactured ‘substitute’ foods, notably the ominous-sounding National Margarine. Rose hip marmalade, and equivalent relishes and side-dishes, also represent a significant strand of continuity through to contemporary foraging practices in that even in extremis they rarely constituted the primary elements of sustenance (i.e. of calories consumed) but furnished instead a marginal, though nonetheless welcome, contribution to the diet. Whilst most present-day foragers looking to the hedgerows – for blackberries, or sloes for sloe gin – no longer do so because there is no alternative

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Foraging behaviour indicates marginal marine habitat for New Zealand sea lions: remnant versus recolonising populations

Foraging behaviour indicates marginal marine habitat for New Zealand sea lions: remnant versus recolonising populations

Comparisons with the Auckland Islands. We used data from Chilvers et al. (2005) and Chilvers (2009) for comparison with our results. These studies reported the latest data available for the Auckland Islands at the 3 breeding colonies (Enderby, Dundas and Figure of Eight Islands). Only the foraging behaviour of adult females nursing pups was investigated. Consequently, for comparison purposes, only the results of adult females from the Otago population, all nursing a pup and one nursing a yearling, were used (n = 8). The data available for the Auckland Islands was obtained dur- ing 1, 2, and 4 yr, respectively, for Figure of Eight, Dun- das and Enderby Islands. The satellite tracking tech- nique used similar instruments. However, the methods used to filter the Argos locations differed between the studies (a speed-only filter was applied to Argos loca- tions for the Auckland Islands data; Chilvers et al. 2005). The purpose of applying different filters was to obtain the best estimates of foraging ranges; the choice of filter depended on the configuration of the sites and the foraging characteristics of the animals. Due to the scale of the differences found in the results, this does not affect the validity of the comparison between the sites. The studies at the Auckland Islands were also conducted ~1.5 mo earlier in the year (from mid - January to end of February) than in our study. The implications of this difference are assessed in the dis-

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Bird functional traits affect seed dispersal patterns of China’s endangered trees across different disturbed habitats

Bird functional traits affect seed dispersal patterns of China’s endangered trees across different disturbed habitats

Effects of functional traits on seed dispersal patterns To quantify how bird functional traits affected seed dis- persal patterns, we selected eight functional traits that are functionally related to the foraging and post-foraging flight behaviours of frugivorous birds (Moermond and Denslow 1985) as follows: foraging behaviours (food habit, foraging pattern, foraging frequency, weight, and length) and flight performance behaviours (wing length, tail length, weight, length, and habitat specialisation). All morphological traits were measured using two male and two female museum specimens of each bird species from local populations. In addition, data on food hab- its (frugivorous, omnivorous) and habitat specialisation (generalist, specialist) were compiled from A Field Guide to the Birds of China (MacKinnon et  al. 2000). For the analyses, we used the mean measurement of each trait for each species. All morphological traits were log-trans- formed to approximate normality.

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Title: LOAD BALANCING IN CLOUD COMPUTING

Title: LOAD BALANCING IN CLOUD COMPUTING

Abstract- From a decade ago there has been a quick advancement in the utilization of web and its applications. Distributed computing is otherwise called internet based computing where we lease the registering assets over the web. It is a compensation for each utilization show where you pay for the measure of administrations leased. It gives various focal points over the traditional computing. With cloud computing increasing such an enormous energy now days, the workplace culture is notwithstanding changing the same number of individuals now very much wants to telecommute as opposed to going each day to office. There are three primary administrations gave by cloud that are SAAS, IAAS and PAAS. Load balancing is an extremely real issue confronted now days in cloud environment so that the assets are proficiently used. There are many load balancing algorithms accessible that are utilized to balance the load of the customer demands. In this paper we will propose an approach which is a blend of Honeybee Foraging Algorithm, Active clustering algorithm and Ant Colony Optimization.

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Contrasting behavior between two populations of an ice obligate predator in East Antarctica

Contrasting behavior between two populations of an ice obligate predator in East Antarctica

Our study highlighted some of the key foraging strategies adopted by Weddell seals during the Antarctic winter. At both sites, Weddell seals remained in coastal areas associated with dense sea- ice over shallow bathymetry that are surrounded by deep canyons and depressions. In these areas, Weddell seals concentrated their foraging activity within the range of their breathing abilities, likely until prey depletion, before moving to another area. The differences observed in distances trave- led, foraging activity, and diving behavior resulted from differences in sea- ice conditions and prey targeted between the focal sites. Overall, Weddell seal foraging behavior responded to the physical aspects of their environment (seafloor topography and sea- ice features) that are likely to be associated with better prey availability and accessibility as well as reliable access to breathing sites. At finer scales, the for- aging behavior of Weddell seals likely responded to the distribution and availability of prey in the water column, switching from pelagic to benthic foraging, exhibiting diurnal behavior, and complex diving behaviors.

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Optimal Fuzzy Tuning Using Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm

Optimal Fuzzy Tuning Using Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm

Many of species depends in its survival on their fitness. The law of evolution supports those species who have better food searching ability and either eliminates or reshapes those with poor search ability. Application of group foraging strategy of a swarm of E.coli bacteria in multi-optimal function optimization is the notion of the new algorithm. So by understanding and modeling of foraging behavior in any of the evolutionary species, leads to its application in any nonlinear system optimization algorithm. The foraging strategy of Escherichia coli bacteria present in human can be described by four processes, namely chemotaxis, swarming, reproduction and elimination-dispersal.

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1). The burrows were recorded in both cultivated and wild habitats of the study area at the two positive sites (Image 2 C&D). The soil texture was sandy with some mixed clay and silt. Two types of burrows of the Indian Pangolin were found at the positive sampling sites; temporary or feeding burrows and the living or sleeping or permanent burrows. Feeding burrows were less deep and excavated by the species during foraging on ants and termites (evidence of foraging on ants), whereas the permanent living burrows were much deeper having round opening and used by the species for living (resting) purpose. At Lassan Nawab, a total of 11 feeding burrows were recorded whereas at Paras site, a total of 16 feeding burrows were recorded. The mean burrow height was 16.75cm, width 19.94cm, and depth 16.48cm (Table 3; Image 2; Fig. 2). The height of entrance of burrow was measured vertically at the burrow opening while width was measured horizontally. Far fewer permanent living burrows of the Indian Pangolin were found at the two positive sampling sites compared to feeding burrows. At Lassan Nawab only two living burrows of the species were

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Lifecycle-based Swarm Optimization Method for Constrained Optimization

Lifecycle-based Swarm Optimization Method for Constrained Optimization

Biology has strong survival instincts, which would indicate organism foraging method. This is an individual behavior, which don’t reference to other individuals foraging information. Some animals are “cruise” or “ambush” searchers [17]. For the cruise approach to searching, the some forager moves continuously through the environment constantly searching for prey. For the ambush approach to searching, some forager sits and waits for prey to cross into strike range. In fact, the search strategies of some forager are in between the cruise and ambush, that is “salutatory” search. Fig. 2 gives the illustration of these strategies. To find better living conditions, survival instincts lead animals to migrate to a better habitat. Some animals migrate only short distances. Some animals are continually migrating great distances.

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The Impacts of Diet and Insecticide Resistance on German Cockroach Foraging Behavior, Mating Success, and Bait Performance (Blattella germanica).

The Impacts of Diet and Insecticide Resistance on German Cockroach Foraging Behavior, Mating Success, and Bait Performance (Blattella germanica).

96 We produced two synthetic foods varying only in protein-to-carbohydrate ratio (Table 1). Each food alone represented a nutritionally imbalanced diet, but when paired the two foods were complementary, because animals could obtain an optimal diet by varying their intake of the two foods. To test for effects of foraging distance on specific nutrient ingestion and resulting performance outcomes, we separated the two foods (2 cm vs. 118 cm) by placing them next to each other in small containers (18.5 cm × 13.0 cm) or at opposite ends of long containers (121.9 cm × 10.4 cm). We covered the inner sides with a thin layer of grease (1:1 mix of petroleum jelly and mineral oil), which prevented the cockroaches from walking on the sides. The short arena received one segment of egg carton for shelter (one egg-hole, Volume = ~6.062 cm 3 ), whereas the long arena received eight cardboard egg cartons lined length-wise (48 egg-holes, Volume = ~2900.224 cm 3 ). The cardboard egg cartons exactly matched the width of the containers and served to expand the three-

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