German Literature and Culture

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Punk poetics and West German literature of the eighties

Punk poetics and West German literature of the eighties

Lottmann did not contain his engagement with politics, pop culture, and media to Spex. He began to write for the national newspaper Die Zeit in 1986. But despite his move into what can justly be called the institution of journalism, Lottmann continued to test and theorize the spaces and possibilities in media and the popular. In April of 1986, he dismissed pop coolness and punk because it had been coopted by mainstream French cinema: “Die angestrebte Adaption britischer Pop-Coolness hat nur dazu geführt, daß man bei jedem Darsteller denkt: So schön das Punk-Outfit auch ist, lieber würde dieser Herr im Bistro sitzen, rotwein trinken, Käse essen und wild gestikulierend sabbeln.” [the sought-after adaptation of British pop-coolness only lead to fact that with every actor one thinks: As nice as the punk-outfit is, this guy would rather sit in a bistro, drink red wine, eat cheese and babble while gesticulating wildly]. 7 Here the problem is that the adaptive potential of pop-culture only provides a façade for people who would rather be doing something else. People did not care about the political potential in the popular. They did not care about what mattered to punk or post-punk. In August, Lottmann’s review of The Karate Kid II cast a hopeless situation under an American pop-cultural hegemony that seemed destined to dominate the globe and make nothing matter, not even Hiroshima. But the worst for Lottmann was that: “93 Prozent aller US-
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Edith Wharton's relationship to German literature: A study in creative affinity

Edith Wharton's relationship to German literature: A study in creative affinity

“archâologischer Enthusiast” who “sammelte nicht, um zu sammeln, sondern um einer Idee widen. Er war Tendenzsammler” (1, 75). He has devoted his life and his research to prove that “die M ark Brandeburg nicht nur von Uranfang an ein deutsches Land gewesen, sondern auch durch alle Jahrhunderte hin geblieben sei. Die wendische Invasion habe nur den Charakter einer Sturzwelle gehabt, durch die oberflachlich das cine oder andere geandert, dieser oder jener Name slawisiert worden sei. Aber nichts weiter. In der Bevolkerung [...] habe deutsche Sitte und Sage fortgelebt. [...] Alles, was zugleich Kultur und Kultus ausdriicke, sei so gewiB germanisch, wie Teut selber ein Deutscher gewesen sei.” (I, 75). His interpretation o f his finds is contrasted by his friend Justizrat Turgany, who in his youth had enthused w ith Seidentopf over “Germanicity” and Hermann the Cheruscan, but who has later converted to panslavism. It seems to me that here we can already see an example o f a defective and biased historical memory at work to create an exclusive, in this case anti-sIav myth. (It is also interesting to notice that in Effi Bhest, set in the 1880s, we find another ecclesiastic, Kantor Jahnke, who has archaeological interests and believes in the idea that the “reine Germanen, von denen wir alle abstammen” (VII, 414) had preceded the Wende in the settlement o f Schwedisch-Pommem). In all this I see the myth o f blood and soil at work to justify the conquest o f the eastern territory taken from the Slavs. It is an example o f the way the concept o f German tradition became narrowly defined and distorted. This involved a selective processing o f the history o f Germany leading to a constructed and manipulated idea o f heritage based on criteria o f race, place and culture. Only what was usable o f its past was retained. W hat did not fit into the scheme was ignored or denied. This reconstruction o f the past shows a biased and defective memory at work to create a reactionary and exclusive - rather than liberal and inclusive - myth o f the German nation which served the purposes o f the creation o f the Second German Reich by Bismarck and Wilhelm I. It was necessary to forget that Germany had been for centuries a collection o f politically and economically insignificant little principalities culturally dominated by France. The German people had to be fused together into one nation and the Empire had to appear as the realization o f their supposed secular national aspirations and even as the continuation of the First German Empire created by Otto I, crowned imperator augustus in 962. This project presented some problems:
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GER 341: After the Fall of the Wall: German Literature since 1989

GER 341: After the Fall of the Wall: German Literature since 1989

Any outreach activity, service learning activity or combination of activities of at least 6 hours. Possible activities: attending a lecture, film screening or event relevant to German culture, being an active member or Stammtisch, Kaffeestunde or a German club. You will have to provide documentation in order to receive credit. Look on Blackboard for weekly announcements of German events.

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German literature and the world-view of science in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

German literature and the world-view of science in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

in their consistency — from fixatio to dissolution ( ‘Goethe’s Die Wahlverwandtschaften: An Alchemical Process from Fixatio to Dissolutio', Symposium, 35 (1981), p. 235.) Elisabeth von Thadden also details Goethe’s knowledge of hermetic literature in her excellent study Erzahlen als Naturverhaltnis — ‘Die Wahlverwandtschaften’: Zum Problem der Darstellbarkeit von Natur und Gesellschaft seit Goethes Plan eines ‘Roman Uber das WeltalV (Munich: Fink, 1993), p. 160, note 135. On this, see also Waltraud Wietholter, ‘Legenden: Zur Mythologie von Goethes Wahlverwandtschaften’, DVLG, 56 (1982), pp. 37-52, and Bernhard Buschendorf, Goethes mythische Denkform: Zur Ikonographie der ‘Wahlverwandtschaften’ (Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, 1986). On alchemy and literature in general, see Knoespel, ‘The Mythological Transformations of Renaissance Science’, in Amrine, Literature and Science (1989), pp. 99-112. On alchemy in Germany, see Pamela H. Smith, The Business o f Alchemy: Science and Culture in the Holy Roman Empire (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994).
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Development of Teaching Materials of German Literature with Children’s Literature Material Based on Blended Learning

Development of Teaching Materials of German Literature with Children’s Literature Material Based on Blended Learning

According to Prof. Sikorsy in Ruttkowski, a Russian linguist and literary expert said that if literature and culture are not developed, people's morals will decline, because the values of brotherhood and openness do not develop. For this reason, children begin early to be taught literary. To deepen the culture and literature of the nation, the government must also publish cheap and subsidized literary books, because that would make literary work easier. The government must also establish a language and literature study center that has the authority to develop culture, language and literature in Germany. Children's literary works should be educational, not anarchic (violence). Literature should produce more works that symbolize the struggle, sacrifice and devotion of children to parents, society, nation and state.
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The German literature in American exile – great writers and their wives: perspectives from Russian scholars

The German literature in American exile – great writers and their wives: perspectives from Russian scholars

Abstract. The article focuses on the life and art of the famous Germane writers, namely Thomas Mann, Lion Feuchtwanger, and Franz Werfel. After the outbreak of WWII, when the Nazi forces invaded these lands, a lot of emigres managed to leave for the USA. For many of them, the escape route was extremely turbulent. The German writers in the USA settled closely together in California, forming a tight community. The famous Germane writers had to decide upon two principal questions: what they could do for the culture of their home country while staying in exile, and how to interact with the culture of the country where they live. In this connection, it is of great importance to analyze not their works, but the books of their wives. They took care of the house and children on a daily basis, as well as became secretaries, councilors, and closest associates of their great husbands. The authors also propose the main perspectives on a future research on this topic, focusing on the social and political phenomenon of “the community of German writers in American exile”, analyzing how the intellectual community was formed, discussing the documents of this age, studying the memories about their time in America in the context of the contemporary gender theory.
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Female experiences of rape and hunger in postwar German literature, 1945-1960

Female experiences of rape and hunger in postwar German literature, 1945-1960

Walter is aware of what happens to him when he does not eat: “Ich hatte Angst vor mir selbst, und immer dachte ich an den Mann, der einmal im Lehrlingsheim einen Lichtbildvortrag über eine Nordpolexpedition gehalten und uns erzählt hatte, daβ sie frischgefangene Fische lebend zerrissen und roh verschlungen hätten” (20). This anecdote becomes crucial throughout the narration and terrifies him. Why is Walter scared? If hunger is supposedly his ultimate fear and bread satisfies his hunger, is he then scared of ripping the bread, “Leib,” into pieces? If we read this passage through the lens of cultural anthropologist Carol Adams, we might be able to comprehend what lies beneath Walter’s fear of this anecdote. The focus on butchering animals signifies, in Adams’ interpretation, women as the absent referent. Violence done to animals goes hand in hand with sexual violence done to women, since female bodies are objectified and fragmented in our visual culture. Adams proposes that “consumption is the fulfillment of oppression.” 218 When Walter fragments Hedwig’s body and finally takes possession of her through his offer to feed her, her identity completely dissolves and he can ascribe any meaning onto her: “Finally consumed, it exists only through what it represents.” 219 He directs his hunger and aggression onto a female body. Bread in that sense serves as a replacement for the sexual desire of consuming women. The North Pole anecdote
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Influence of Organizational Culture on Green IT Adoption: Study Literature

Influence of Organizational Culture on Green IT Adoption: Study Literature

Abstract―Green IT (Information Technology) becomes one of the latest considerations to increase environmental sustainability and reduce the cost of Information Technology operation. However, the successful adoption of Green IT needs Green IT readiness measurement taken for the considerations of organizations leader. Green IT readiness focused on capability and maturity the Green IT effects on the organization. G- Readiness Molla was the integrated framework that usually used for Green IT Readiness. G-Readiness framework had five important dimensions, which were attitude, policy, practice, technology, and governance. Without considering how organization culture affected Green IT adoption. This research purpose was to build the appropriate model for inspecting the effect of organizational culture on the five dimensions of Green IT Readiness, that was Green IT Attitude, Green IT Policy, Green IT Practice, Green IT Technology, and Green IT Governance. Based on our literature review, we proposed a hypothesis: organizational culture was one of the key determinant factors in Green IT Readiness. Thus we updated the G-Readiness Molla framework by adding organizational culture as one of its dimensions.
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A brutalized culture : the horror genre in contemporary Irish literature

A brutalized culture : the horror genre in contemporary Irish literature

Most of the cultural artifacts mentioned in his plays, however, are not Irish: they are British, Australian, or American. In Beauty Queen of Leenane, Pato expresses his fondness for the 1980’s Australian soap Sons and Daughters, in which “Everybody’s always killing each other and a lot of the girls do have swimsuits” (52). Though Maureen calls such stuff “Australian oul shite,” Ray responds: “Sure, that’s why I do like it. Who wants to see Ireland on telly” (75-6). A Skull in Connemara references a wide range of American cop shows from the ‘70s and ‘80s: Hill Street Blues, Quincy, McMillan and Wife, and Starsky and Hutch. The Lonesome West adds references to Alias, Smith and Jones as well as the British women’s publications Take a Break and Woman’s Own. The main plot device of The Cripple of Inishmaan is the filming of an American movie on the island. The kids on Inishmaan also spend their time pining after foreign candy not usually available in Aran. In all of these cases, entertainment is not located within a traditional Irish culture: it is foreign and imported. As Ray says, “All you have to do is look out your window to see Ireland. And it’s soon bored you’d be. ‘There goes a calf’” (75). If Ireland is associated with anything, it is boredom, and imported entertainment offers an escape from that boredom. Whether such escape is
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Literature Review Chinese American: Culture and Care Needs

Literature Review Chinese American: Culture and Care Needs

(ABSTRACT) This paper provides a brief review of the literature on traditional Chinese medicine in both China and the United States and presents observations from a preliminary study of Chinese practitioners in the Chinatown section of Los Angeles, California. The dualistic health care system in Chinese culture is described as comprising both scholarly and folk traditions, and the roles of both styles of practitioners in dealing with physical and socio-psychological problems are explored. Based on observation of medical professionals and herb specialty shops, interviews with traditional doctors and acupuncturists, and perusal of ads in local Chinese American newspapers, it is concluded that several types of alternative health care providers currently practice in Chinatown: (1)"Chinese-style doctors," mostly elderly, who rely on pulse diagnosis and treat patients with herbal medicines and dietary advice; (2) acupuncturists; (3) Chinese chiropractors or bone setters; (4) dispersers of herbs, tonics, and patent medicines; and (5) psychics. It is suggested that the continuing influx of Chinese immigrants, as well as the Chinese's tendency to seek to enhance their health status, contributes to the maintenance of the traditional health care sector in Chinese American communities.
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GERMAN 1001 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE, LEVEL I

GERMAN 1001 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE, LEVEL I

Extra credit (max. 10% added to your final score): Attend a German cultural event, research German websites or German language software, or view a German film (you choose the topic, but please see your instructor for prior approval), and write a 200-300 word account in German on the experience (due 3 weeks before the final oral exam). Do expect some corrections to your written part. Submit your corrected written version (2 weeks before the final). You present on the same topic orally during 3-4 minutes (with a 3-4 slide powerpoint) in front of the class (due ca. 2 weeks before the final or in consultation with your instructor). Written and oral parts add up to 100 points. Limit one extra credit assignment per student per course.
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Positive Value of Ancient Indian Culture and World Literature

Positive Value of Ancient Indian Culture and World Literature

T.S. Eliot, who was born in St. Louis, Missouri, studied at Harvard, the Sorbonne and Oxford and received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1948, drew his intellectual sustenance from Dante, Shakespeare, the Bible, St. John of the Cross and other Christian mystics, the Greek dramatists, Baudelaire, and the Bhagavad Gita. Over and over again, whether in The Wasteland, Four Quarters, Ash Wednesday or Murder in the Cathedral, the influence of Indian philosophy and mysticism on him is clearly noticeable.

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Entrepreneurship Development, Culture and Practice: A Theoretical Analysis of Literature

Entrepreneurship Development, Culture and Practice: A Theoretical Analysis of Literature

The supply of entrepreneurship is affected by many factors, not all of which can easily be controlled or changed. In many countries market regulations limit the incentives that could encourage would-be entrepreneurs to start their own enterprises. For example, price ceilings that are set below market equilibrium lower the amount of revenue that an entrepreneur could earn in a certain industry. If the anticipated economics benefits are lower than the opportunity cost, than the would-be entrepreneur will not start his own enterprise. Thus, in many countries policies should be implemented to increase and improve the incentives for entrepreneurs. Additional policy possibilities include tax incentives for entrepreneurs (Choi, 2008). The government can also increase the supply of entrepreneurs through providing the necessary support networks which will go a long way in establishing appropriate entrepreneurial culture in the country.
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Antisthenes’ Odysseus: its context in ancient literature and culture

Antisthenes’ Odysseus: its context in ancient literature and culture

The speeches are a significant contribution to postHomeric presentations of Odysseus and Ajax in an intellectual context as opposed to poetic, which has been recognized by Montiglio in h[r]

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Gender and Organizational Culture: A Literature Review of Past Theories

Gender and Organizational Culture: A Literature Review of Past Theories

In place of Ulysses, this study proposes Xena warrior princess as a "mythical" figure who breaks into the male appropriation of leadership in the following ways. First, the name Xena is the feminine form of the Greek word xenos meaning a stranger, suggesting a woman who has existed for some time but, like the women executive, is not recognized by the dominant culture as one of them. Second, the Xena warrior princess character is an entirely modern invention of the entertainment industry who is, nevertheless, depicted as a classical leader of an often disparate band of women who rival men in their heroic exploits while providing a quintessential female form and image.
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[X442.Ebook] Fee Download German Men Sit Down To Pee And Other Insights Into German Culture By Niklas Frank James Cave.pdf

[X442.Ebook] Fee Download German Men Sit Down To Pee And Other Insights Into German Culture By Niklas Frank James Cave.pdf

German men sit down to pee’ is a tongue-in-cheek guidebook to German culture that highlights the rules Germans consciously and unconsciously follow, while trying to make a little sense of it all along the way. Why, for example, mowing your lawn on a Sunday will mean getting an earful from your neighbour, but lie naked in the middle of a public park and nobody will bat an eyelid.

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Strategies for an Effective Safety Culture and Prevent Errors in Nursing: Literature Review

Strategies for an Effective Safety Culture and Prevent Errors in Nursing: Literature Review

31 The critical reflection is considered essential in the search for the improvement of the quality of health and in the implementation of a safety culture, such as Araújo et al (2017) stand for. In what concerns the supervision and the existence of standards, Silva and Rodrigues (2016), reinforce that these strategies are strong points for the safety of the patient. The same authors relate that conflict management is essential to the maintenance of a positive safety culture. Emphasize the importance of leadership on the part of senior managers to avoid moments of tension and confusion among colleagues. Finally, Silva and Rodrigues (2016, p. 141) reinforce the importance of focusing the patient as the focus of care, stating that “The complexity of health is the ability to understand the parts easier to understand the whole. (…) From this look, the care breaks down barriers and exists when it is understood and accepted by its actors: client, family and nurse, putting focus on the customer and considering the history of life, experiences, values and contexts.”Two of the things that became very clear after the reading and analysis of the articles were: the direct relationship between the existence of a safety culture with the reduction of adverse events; as well as the greater effectiveness in the reduction of adverse events to change the system, making it more secure, instead of changing the human condition, such as stressed byMendes and Barroso (2014, p. 204): "(…) the patient safety is not an individual problem nor a professional category, but a process that involves a transformation at the institutional level."
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Reconstructing the Wilderness: Finding Identity, Culture and Values in Filipino Children’s Literature

Reconstructing the Wilderness: Finding Identity, Culture and Values in Filipino Children’s Literature

Through time, environmental concepts and their elements utilized in literature dynamically expand in terminology and in meaning as the disciplinary boundaries of ecocriticism still try to find the right foothold in the field of literary ecology. As such, this paper initially attempts to trace how the wilderness is understood and employed as an environmental trope throughout the years. Traditionally, the wilderness literally represented untamed landscapes. This conception also figuratively highlighted the contrast between culture and nature. The term wilderness dates back to the agricultural revolution, some 10,000 years ago. It emerged then because “it is only with settled agriculture that a distinction is made between cultivated and uncultivated land, savage and settled, domesticated and wild animals” (5). The context of this emergence of wilderness may be connected to its old definitions. For example, “[i]n Hebrew, one definition of wilderness is unsown land, in ancient Greek it meant not cultivated and, in Latin, barren waste. In English, the expression may come from the old English term, wildeoren, referring to wild beasts” (5). In other derivations of the term, wilderness may also be associated with “the word Anglo-Saxon ‘wilddeoren’, where ‘deoren’ or beasts existed beyond the boundaries of cultivation” (Garrard 60). Of all these, the principal state of wilderness that comes into view, as transformed continually according to its significance to human interaction, is the concept of ‘wildness’.
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Producing/Reproducing Ideology: Unearthing Multiple Perspectives on Literature and Popular Culture

Producing/Reproducing Ideology: Unearthing Multiple Perspectives on Literature and Popular Culture

In addition, the students also managed to identify gender issues prevalent in the series. For example, based on the first question - What systematic body of ideas or philosophy was articulated by the characters in Friends in relation to their social aspirations and daily activities? – and the second question - What masking, concealment or distortions are present in relation to the characters’ social relationships – e.g. family, work, society as well as romantic relationships? - they unearth the fact that Friends, in a covert way, also supports homosexuality as part of the American way of life. This is because, according to the students, homosexuality is often portrayed in the series. Though at times homosexuality is ridiculed and becomes a source of comic relief, it is projected as harmless thus reflecting the growing acceptance of homosexuality into the dominant culture. Nevertheless, issues relating to masculinity and femininity are also put forth in the series. One student identified masculinity/femininity as a source for the writers to create humour. In saying this, the student also said that the most common outcome of raising issues of masculinity/femininity is the fact that American society, as portrayed in the series, values physical beauty thus promoting the preoccupation with vanity. Therefore, at the end of the session, the students found that their careful analyses show Friends is more than just about how six friends go through life in a big city. They succeeded in challenging the claim that Friends was championing mainstream American lifestyle by uncovering the ideological project, the realisation and the unconscious of the text.
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Human culture and science fiction: a review of the literature, 1980-2016

Human culture and science fiction: a review of the literature, 1980-2016

This article aimed to uncover the foci, themes, and findings of research literature that utilized science fiction content or concepts to describe and illustrate human culture. To capture a representative range of research, the PRISMA process was applied to database searches across a range of disciplines, not restricted to science fiction journals. Findings revealed that science fiction literature has been used in research across disciplines including theology, semantics, natural sciences, and education. Two characteristics of the use of science fiction in research became evident in the review: its role as a tool for advocacy and cultural insight and its effectiveness as an aid to learning and teaching. An unclear boundary between real science and science in the public imagination is problematic for research success, but the purposeful integration of fictional representations of science (both natural and social) into the research story has demonstrable benefits. To address the limited application of objective methodologies, adoption of increasingly robust quantitative analysis into research in the fields of literature and culture is recommended. This would assist in bridging the two cultures divide between the humanities and natural sciences.
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