Glass waste

Top PDF Glass waste:

Effect Of Sintering Rate On Glass Waste Composite

Effect Of Sintering Rate On Glass Waste Composite

In this study, glass waste composite is prepared from glass waste and SBE. This work will be initiated by preparing the raw materials needed in order to resume on sample preparation. The material must be on intended condition to ensure that the expected result is precisely meet. The glass waste is cleaned to avoid dirt and impurities exist beneath it. The glass waste composite will be prepared first by crushing the glass waste using crusher. Crushed glass obtained is then applied in planetary ball milling to finer the size to approximately 75 µm. SBE will be cleaned using sonication process. Ethanol will added and the mixture will be placed in ultrasonic bath. This process have to be done 6 times before dried from any excess liquid existence from it. The raw material is then mixed in ball grinding machine with the volume of 70% glass and 30% SBE in the composition of each samples.
Show more

24 Read more

Hospital Waste Characterization and Proposal of Management Technique for Onsite Disposal in Ujjain City

Hospital Waste Characterization and Proposal of Management Technique for Onsite Disposal in Ujjain City

First, we have done a survey on hospitals of Ujja in, There a re total 4 government and 53 ma in private hospitals approximately, we not includes small nursing homes and clinics of beds less than 10. Govern ment hospitals generate an average of 0.592 kg/bed/day of the waste and private hospitals generates 0.435 kg/bed/day of waste approx. The various type of biomedical waste generated in the hospital is collected by the all the me mbers of the hospital. Then we done a survey on the type of waste generation in each ward, quantity of waste generated, type as well as time of d isposal etc. We have collected the data of quantity of waste generation of hospitals of Ujja in city on the basis of color code system of diffe rent shifts for around 21 days alternatively and calculated the total waste collected according to the color coded bags or containers based on shifts. The yellow color is used for highly infectious waste collection, red is for plastic waste and blue bags are for all type of glass waste and for discarded o r outdated medic ines. We had started from mid day of weekend Thursday till the next 15 day, and the 15 th day is also Thursday. We collected the waste within four shifts like wise;
Show more

8 Read more

Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2013 Page 325

Volume 2, Issue 8, August 2013 Page 325

is released into the atmosphere [3]. Therefore, it is imperative that technologies be developed to reduce the production of Portland-cement clinker in rotary kilns while maintaining the target production of cements and meeting the demand of the construction industry [4]. The construction industry is required to adopt environmentally friendly practices and make judicious use of natural resources. Major contributions to sustainable development can be made by reducing the consumption of Portland cement through partially replacing it with supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs). The accumulation of waste glass in the plants represents two major problems: solid waste disposal and a negative impact to the environment. However, waste glass powder offers a highly desirable chemistry for use as a SCM [5]. Size reduction of glass to enhance its chemical reactivity is the key enabling step for converting the landfill-bound mixed-color waste glass into a valuable product capable of partially replacing cement in concrete. This highly promising concept has not, however, been picked up by the cement and concrete industry. The reason is that earlier efforts to recycle waste glass in concrete viewed crushed glass with dimensions of few millimeters as a replacement for sand in concrete [6, 7]. A coarse crushed glass used as concrete aggregate can cause alkali-silicate reactions (ASR) in hard concrete resulting in harmful expansion in the interface between the cement and glass surfaces [8, 9]. The ground glass particles (<75 μm) initiate pozzolanic reactions without harmful expansion deformations [10]. The coarse and fine aggregates can trigger ASR in concrete whereas glass powder can suppress the tendency to ASR and produce an effect similar to that of supplementary cementitious materials such as pozzolan [11]. In papers of other researchers [5-18] waste glass was ground in dry environments only. The present study is an investigation of the effects of increasing the fineness of glass powders by grinding in a wet environment and of the influence of the waste glass slurries obtained on concrete properties. The glass powders studied were borosilicate glass lamp waste (DRL), fluorescent lamp glass waste (LB) and glass cullet powders, which are used as a cement component in concrete.
Show more

6 Read more

Partial Replacement of Fine Aggregate and Coarse Aggregate by Waste Glass Powder and Coconut Shell

Partial Replacement of Fine Aggregate and Coarse Aggregate by Waste Glass Powder and Coconut Shell

In civil engineering construction, Economy of any construction project depends upon its construction, advancement and sustainability. Using alternative materials in place of natural aggregates in concrete production makes concrete as sustainable and environmental friendly construction material. Use of solid waste can achieve economy in construction. This study concluded that the utilisation of coconut shells and glass waste as aggregates in concrete not only helps in getting them utilized in concrete but also has numerous indirect benefits such as reduction in land fill cost and protecting environment from possible pollution effect. With increasing concern over the excessive exploitation of natural aggregates, this environmental waste compromising of coconut shells and waste glass is a viable new source of structural aggregate material. The study concluded that up to 10% replacement of coarse aggregates by coconut shells and up to (20-30) percent replacement of fine aggregates by waste glass, compressive strength increases. Also there is an increase in the flexural strength of concrete up to 10% replacement of fine aggregates in combination with replacement of coarse aggregates from 10% to 30%.Hence, Coconut Shell and waste Glass can be effectively used as coarse and fine aggregate replacement up to 20% to improve the strength of concrete. Among various mixes compressive strength is maximum for the mix in which fine aggregates are Mix ratio 7days
Show more

7 Read more

Carbon Filled Glass Ceramic: From Waste To Wealth

Carbon Filled Glass Ceramic: From Waste To Wealth

Glass is an amorphous solid. It used in plenty of applications such as in packaging, tableware, housing and building, electronic, industry and etc. Glasses can be categorized as brittle and typically transparent. Nowadays, the amount of waste glass is increasing due to increase in glass based products. Most of the waste is dumped into landfill and contribute waste management and lead to environmental problems. One of the efforts to overcome this problem is through recycling. Glass waste can be recycling into another product, which at the same time not only can reduce the municipal waste but reduce the cost of the product as the price as new product can be process at lower temperature. The most common type of glass is soda lime silicate (SLS), compose around 60-75% of silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ), 12-18% of sodium oxide
Show more

24 Read more

Behaviour of Concrete with Waste Glass Fiber Powder

Behaviour of Concrete with Waste Glass Fiber Powder

Abstract— Glass is basically used in the industries, for decoration purpose in building’s construction and also in our daily use items such as bottle, container and utensils etc. After the life span or use it is dumped anywhere as a waste that causes a disposal problem to environment because of its properties of non-biodegradable. Most of the glass waste are not being recycled and directly disposes to landfills. If this waste converted into aggregate after the recycling or grinding will results into the solution of disposal problem and reduces the supply of raw materials for construction. Glass can cause deleterious alkali- silica reaction problems because of alkaline environment. Due to this, it can be ground into a fine powder and used as a pozzolonic material in concrete. In laboratory experiments it can suppress the alkali-reactivity of coarser glass particles, as well as that of natural reactive aggregates. It undergoes beneficial pozzolonic reactions in the concrete and could replace up to 30% of cement in some concrete mixes with satisfactory strength development. There is a strong need in concrete industry to replace the raw materials with economic one. Most of the researcher have done experiments on the concrete by replacing constituents with waste glass powder or aggregate. After their conclusion it was found that there is strength regression and expansion in concrete mix if waste glass aggregate replaced with coarse aggregate. This was due alkali reactions. And strength loss was also found in fine aggregate substitution.
Show more

9 Read more

Beta rays affect on verification the nuclear waste in glass and glass ceramics

Beta rays affect on verification the nuclear waste in glass and glass ceramics

There has been considerably more research and technology development conducted on glass waste forms than any other waste form over the past 50 years. This is because their amorphous and relatively disordered structures can incorporate a wide range of chemical elements. Borosilicate compositions that include 30 to 40 different elements are used routinely for high level waist(HLW). Such compositions produce highly durable glasses[2-6]. Most elements play one of three basic roles in glass structures: network formers, network modifiers and intermediates. In borosilicate glass structures, the network is primarily formed of the chains of borate and silicate polyhedra, lithium, sodium and calcium are typical network modifiers that create non-bridging oxygens or provide charge balance for some HLW elements[7,8]. A commonality exists between the many different radioactive waste glass systems and the structural role components play in a glass. Compositionally, the glass forming elements in HLW glasses constitute 60 to 85 wt% of the glass structure; network modifiers make up 0 to 25% of the glass, while 15 to 40 wt% are intermediates[9].
Show more

5 Read more

Neutron radiation effects on the nuclear waste (Ce) vitrification in glass and glass-ceramics

Neutron radiation effects on the nuclear waste (Ce) vitrification in glass and glass-ceramics

Radionuclide's may occupy specific atomic positions in the periodic structures of constituent crystalline phases, which are as a dilute solid solution. The coordination polyhedral in each phase impose specific size, charge and bonding constraints on the nuclides that can be incorporated into the structure. This means that ideal waste form phases usually have relatively complex structure types with a number of different coordination polyhedral of various sizes and shapes and with multiple substitutional schemes to allow for charge balance with radionuclide substitutions (Ewing et al,1982).
Show more

6 Read more

Thermal treatment of simulant plutonium contaminated materials from the Sellafield site by vitrification in a blast-furnace slag

Thermal treatment of simulant plutonium contaminated materials from the Sellafield site by vitrification in a blast-furnace slag

The metallic PCM waste components, given in Tables 1 and 2, suggest that this fraction of the vitrified PCM wastes should consist predominantly of a carbon steel, except in the case of metal waste feed, for which a high Ni Cr steel incorporating trace Al, Pb and Cu could be expected. No additions to improve performance or capa- bility of the metal wasteform fraction were considered necessary (for example, additions of Zr in an effort to incorporate Pu in inter- metallics as noted by Keiser and Abraham [16,17]), since the aim was to effectively partition Pu/Ce into the slag fraction. This could potentially allow the metallic fraction to be disposed of as LLW, lic- enced waste, or even reused, thus drastically reducing the volume of higher activity waste requiring storage or disposal, leading to substantial life cycle cost savings. It should be noted, however, that in operando tapping of liquid slag and metal, to achieve separation of these components, has not yet been routinely demonstrated using currently available thermal treatment technologies. Post
Show more

15 Read more

Retail managers’ perception on coca cola company’s success of glass package recovery and recycling in Nairobi in Kenya

Retail managers’ perception on coca cola company’s success of glass package recovery and recycling in Nairobi in Kenya

The researcher randomly selected 50 retail managers of supermarkets in Nairobi’s central business district (CBD). The managers included in the study are those who had served in the respective stores for not less than one year and the supermarkets must have been in operation for not less than a year. The researcher used a questionnaire survey to gauge the perception of retail managers on the self-evaluated success of Coca Cola Company’s recovery and recycling of their glass bottles. The research was based in Nairobi’s CBD in Kenya. It is expected that almost all the managers of a retail store that handles Coca Cola Company’s products in a capital city would be well exposed to current issues such as the impact of packaging on the environment. To achieve this objective the researcher developed an online questionnaire using a 5-point likert. The questionnaire was administered to retail managers of supermarkets in the CBD. Cronbach’s alpha was used to test the reliability and validity of the questionnaire and obtained a coefficient of 0.71. The study used SPSS to analyze data and specifically descriptive statistics (mean, frequency and percentages) and correlation analyses.
Show more

7 Read more

The Reuse of Waste Glass as Aggregate Replacement for Producing Concrete Bricks as an Alternative for Waste Glass Management on Sichang Island

The Reuse of Waste Glass as Aggregate Replacement for Producing Concrete Bricks as an Alternative for Waste Glass Management on Sichang Island

Waste glass has competency to use as raw materials in building constructions [15]. Many research studies have been conducted on replacing sand (fine aggregate) with waste glass. Limbachiya [16] studied the surface area of clear and colored glass using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and reported that their surface areas were not different. Degirmenci et al. [17] also reported that colored glass has no influence on concrete properties, and using 10%, 30%, and 100% proportions of waste glass, they found that the 10% replacement resulted in the highest compressive strength. Tan and Du [18] and Hooi and Min [9] recommended the use of mixed glass; they compared the chemical compositions of clear and colored glass using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The main component was SiO 2 , and some compounds were similar.
Show more

16 Read more

Characterization of Household Waste in Kinondoni Municipality, Dar Es Salaam

Characterization of Household Waste in Kinondoni Municipality, Dar Es Salaam

The mean waste generation rate values were established to be 0.39 and 0.49 kg/cap/day with a mean value of (calculated by first averaging the daily weight of waste for each household, then dividing this by the number of people in each household, as reported in the household survey, and then averaging the daily per capita waste generation figures across the studied households for Midizini and Mkunguni, respectively. From these findings, an average of 0.44 kilograms of solid waste generated per person per day was computed. The rate is quite in line with World Bank Standard for developing countries which is 0.3 to 0.6 kg/c/d. Another, study on waste generation reported average domestic waste generation rates of 0.34 kg/day per person in low-income areas and 0.42 kg/day per person in planned areas in Dar es Salaam (Kaseva and Mbuligwe 2005). In Nairobi a study carried out by Kasozi and von Blottnitz,(2010), in low to middle income level households per capita generation rates varied from 0.24 – 0.82 kg/person/day, with a mean of 0.43 kg/person/day. A study in Accra Ghana, by Boadi and Kuitunen,(2004), found the specific waste generation rate in low income areas, was at 0.40 kg per capita per day and in middle income areas showed a specific waste generation rate of 0.68 kg per capita per day.
Show more

12 Read more

Compressive and Flexural Strength of Recycled Reactive Powder Concrete Containing Finely Dispersed Local Wastes

Compressive and Flexural Strength of Recycled Reactive Powder Concrete Containing Finely Dispersed Local Wastes

The main objective of this experimental study is to investigate the behavior of Recycled Reactive Powder Concrete (RRPC) developed from finely dispersed local waste raw materials. In this study, RRPC was developed by utilizing local wastes (finely dispersed waste glass powder, waste fly ash and waste ceramic powder) together with Portland cement, fine sand, admixture, steel fibers and water through full replacement of silica fume as well as quartz powder for sustainable construction practice. In this study, all raw materials for making RRPC were analyzed for X-Ray Fluorescence analysis. For sustainability of local construction works, this study employed standard curing method at am- bient temperatures instead of steam curing at higher temperatures. Moreover, hand mixing was used throughout the study. To evaluate the structural per- formances of the developed RRPC mixes, compressive and flexural strengths of RRPC were investigated experimentally and compared with the control mix. The experimental results indicated that replacing the silica fume fully by finely dispersed local waste glass powder (GP) and fly ash (FA) is a promising approach for local structural construction applications. Accordingly, a mean compressive strength of 62.9 MPa and flexural strength of 8.8 MPa were de- veloped using 50% GP-50% FA at 28 th days standard curing. In this study,
Show more

15 Read more

Study on Effect of Waste Glass as Partial Replacement for Coarse Aggregate in Concrete

Study on Effect of Waste Glass as Partial Replacement for Coarse Aggregate in Concrete

GLASS: The amount of waste glass has gradually increased over the recent years due to urbanization and industrialization where most of the waste glass end up in landfill while only small fraction can be recycled because of the high cost of cleaning and colour sorting . Since glass is not biodegradable, landfill is not an environmentally friendly solution. Recent studies have shown that the waste glass can be effectively used in concrete either as aggregate (fine or coarse aggregate) or as cement replacement. Being amorphous and containing relatively large quantities of silicon and calcium , glass is in theory pozzolanic or even cementitious in nature when the particle size is less than 75 micron. Finely ground glass as oppose to coarse waste glass does not contribute to alkali-silica reaction.
Show more

12 Read more

Briquetting of waste glass cullet fine particles for energy saving glass manufacture

Briquetting of waste glass cullet fine particles for energy saving glass manufacture

higher in the remelted briquette, cullet and cullet fines samples than the Base Line.. In the UV edge part of spectrum, there are strong UV peaks from Fe2+ centered.[r]

36 Read more

Recycling of Glass Fibers from Fiberglass Polyester Waste Composite for the Manufacture of Glass Ceramic Materials

Recycling of Glass Fibers from Fiberglass Polyester Waste Composite for the Manufacture of Glass Ceramic Materials

The thermolysis is a highly suitable method for recover- ing valuable products and energy from PFG. This process resulted in 68 wt% solid residue, the liquid (oil) and gas fractions accounted for 24 wt% and 8.0 wt% respectively. The solid residue consisted of 96 wt% glass fiber and 4 wt% carbonaceous material. The solid residue was ox- idezed in air atmosphere, obtaining a glass fiber free of organic matter. The recovering of glass fiber in the com- bined process thermolysis-gasification was 99%. The cleaning glass fiber was successfully recycled by a vitri- fication process. The glass devitrify through a surface crystallization mechanism because the crystallization depends of particle size (particle size fractions larger than 1000 µm are very stable to crystallization). The cry- stalline phases identified in the glass-ceramic materials obtained were wollastonite and plagioclase s.s.
Show more

8 Read more

Download
			
			
				Download PDF

Download Download PDF

Rossomagina et al [5] also concluded that the use of WG as fine aggregate in concrete creates a problem in concrete due to Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR). The reaction between alkalis in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and silica in aggregates forms silica gel. This gel is prone to swelling, because it absorbs water, which results to increase in its volume. Under confinement by cement matrix and aggregate, the swelling of the ASR gel generates hydrostastic pressure. If the reaction continues and internal pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the matrix, cracks will form around the reactive aggregate particle. Adaway and Wang [6] carried out a study on Recycled glass as a partial replacement for fine aggregate in structural concrete- Effects on compressive strength. They concluded that compressive strength increased up to a level of 30% replacement of fine aggregate with WG, at which point strength developed was 9% and 6% higher than control after 7 and 28 days respectively. This led to the conclusion that concrete containing up to 30% fine glass aggregate exhibits higher compressive strength development than normal concrete. Malik, et al [1] also carried out a study on the use of WG as partial replacement of fine aggregates. They replaced fine aggregates by WG powder at 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% by weight for an M-25 mix. The results also concluded that it was possible to use WG powder as partial replacement of fine aggregates up to 30% by weight for particle size range 0 – 1.18mm. Scivacharam, et al [4] observed that compressive strength of concrete made with WG was more than the referral conventional concrete at all levels of cement and natural fine aggregate.
Show more

8 Read more

Suppressing Hydrogen Sulfide Generation by Nitrate or Oxygen Addition in Column Percolation Experiment

Suppressing Hydrogen Sulfide Generation by Nitrate or Oxygen Addition in Column Percolation Experiment

a closed system, such as the column percolation experiment used in this study, the whole prepared air could be introduced by bubbling into the system. However, an actual landfill site is an open system. Assuming that air is bubbled into the H 2 S generating zone in the waste layer, it would

7 Read more

Partial Utilization of Waste Glass and Waste Paper Sludge in Cement Concrete

Partial Utilization of Waste Glass and Waste Paper Sludge in Cement Concrete

The effect of waste glass and waste paper sludge on the strength of concrete for M25 grade can be studied by varying the percentage of waste glass in concrete by replacing it with fine aggregate and waste paper sludge in concrete by replacing it with cement. Waste glass powder content is varied by 0%, 5%, 15%, 25%, and 35% of weight of fine aggregate and waste paper sludge by 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, of weight of cement. Compressive strength and tensile strength of concrete is determined by performing various tests in lab related to them. Cubes of size 150mmX150mmX150mm are casted to check the compressive strength and 300mm length and 150mm diameter cylinders are casted to check the tensile strength of concrete. All the specimens were cured for the period of 7, 14 and 28 days before crushing and thus compression test and split tensile test is performed.
Show more

12 Read more

SIMULATIONS OF THE INFLUENCE OF CHANGES IN WASTE COMPOSITION ON THEIR ENERGETIC PROPERTIES

SIMULATIONS OF THE INFLUENCE OF CHANGES IN WASTE COMPOSITION ON THEIR ENERGETIC PROPERTIES

Based on the data contained in Tables 1 and 2, the amount of waste taken into account in fur- ther analysis was estimated. It was determined by subtracting the weight of separately collected waste from the mass of waste generated in 2012, the quantities of waste analysed are presented in Table 3. For ease of calculations the waste was divided into four groups. Group I includes paper, cardboard, glass, metals, plastics, mineral waste, textiles, wood, multi-material waste, hazardous waste, other waste categories. Group II is kitchen wastes. Group III is a waste of grain size <10 mm, Table 1. Municipal waste generated in Lubelskie Voivodeship in 2012 (own calculations in the basis of [Szysz- kowski et al. 2012])
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...