Gypsies Roma and Travellers

Top PDF Gypsies Roma and Travellers:

Construction training course for Gypsies, Roma and Travellers. December 2013

Construction training course for Gypsies, Roma and Travellers. December 2013

With regard to the area of apprenticeships, pre-apprenticeships and routes into sustainable employment for not only Irish Travellers, but also for all of the Traveller communities (including Gypsies and Roma from Eastern Europe). The routes and opportunities are often limited, Gypsies, Roma and Travellers are some of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable ethnic groups – frequently encountering barriers to employment that are around, education, opportunity, skills, racism and prejudice. The Process

10 Read more

‘It’s in their culture’: working with automatic prejudice towards Gypsies, Roma and Travellers during care proceedings

‘It’s in their culture’: working with automatic prejudice towards Gypsies, Roma and Travellers during care proceedings

Automatic prejudice is a term that could be used to describe the processes and phenomena of unwitting discrimination towards the ‘conceptual Gypsy’. Where specific education and training has not been provided, there exists evidence to suggest that some decisions made during care proceedings can be informed by unreflected presuppositions. In these cases, decisions are often justified against pathologising or cultural relativist reactions toward a conceptual ‘Gypsy’ culture. In an attempt to reduce the opportunities for automatic prejudice, this paper will briefly show how socio-political discourse has cemented automatic discriminatory attitudes towards Gypsies, Roma and Travellers as a socially acceptable bastion of racism. In specific relation to care proceedings, this paper will argue that the potential influence of automatic prejudice on the decision making process requires children’s guardians, family court advisors and social workers to ensure that any order given, or placement type considered, accurately reflects the realities and lived experiences of the child, and is not influenced by recommendations which might otherwise be indicative of unreflected examples of reciprocated fear between professionals and the community of Gypsies, Roma and Travellers themselves.
Show more

12 Read more

Becoming Visible: Gypsy Roma Travellers in Prison

Becoming Visible: Gypsy Roma Travellers in Prison

41. I discuss such issues in the following articles: Drummond, A. (2007) ‘The Construction of Irish Travellers (and Gypsies) as a Problem’, pp: 2 - 42, in, Migrants and Memory: The Forgotten “Postcolonials”, (Ed. Mícheál Ó hAodha), Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Drummond, A. (2007) ‘Keep on Moving, Don’t Stop Now: Anti-trespass Laws on the Island of Ireland’, (Eds. Micheal Hayes & Thomas Acton) p; 37 - 53, in, Travellers, Gypsies, Roma: The Demonisation of Difference, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle-Upon- Tyne. Drummond, A. (2006), ‘Cultural Denigration: Media representation of Irish Travellers as Criminal’, P: 75 - 85, in, Counter- Hegemony and the Postcolonial “Other” (Eds. M, Hayes, T, Acton), Cambridge Scholars Press, Cambridge.
Show more

6 Read more

Roma, gypsies, travellers and infant feeding

Roma, gypsies, travellers and infant feeding

The sample size of a total of 30 interviews (ten interviews with mothers and grandmothers from each of the three target communities) was designed to be feasible within the time scale and financial resources of the project, and to yield sufficient data to explore the subject in depth. Ritchie et al (2003) emphasise the need for small samples in qualitive research in order to ensure in depth analysis of the data, while recognising that when more than one sample are included within a study for reasons of comparison, that this will increase the sample size overall. Mothers were recruited with children aged three years or younger in order to ensure that feeding experience was relatively recent and grandmothers were included as they are known to have an influence upon how babies are fed (Ingram & Johnson 2004, Ingram et al 2003). A small financial incentive was offered for participation. Recruitment was carried out by link workers who were familiar with the three Gypsy- Traveller groups and worked among them on a regular basis. Link workers identified potential participants and introduced them to the researcher who then explained the consent procedure. An information sheet was circulated in advance of the project by link workers to ensure that potential participants understood the project sufficiently to make an informed choice about participation. Non-English speaking Roma were offered the information sheet translated into Romanian and interpreters were available to answer questions about the project. The researcher was accompanied by a link worker or interpreter for at least part of all interviews. Consent was sought for participation, audio recording, and use of direct quotations in the final report and subsequent publications. All written materials were submitted to the University of the West of England ethics committee who found no ethical objections to this project. Confidentiality and anonymity was addressed in the information leaflet (see appendix 1) which was discussed with the participant prior to the interview taking place.
Show more

40 Read more

Fair Access for all? Gypsies and Travellers in Sussex, GP Surgeries and Barriers to Primary Healthcare. Photo FFT

Fair Access for all? Gypsies and Travellers in Sussex, GP Surgeries and Barriers to Primary Healthcare. Photo FFT

temporary patient with local GP Surgeries and some have reported racism and prejudice directed at them, which leads many people being forced to travel to A&E Departments and Walk in Centres in urban areas or register with a GP Surgery further away from their home. This highlights the need for more Walk in Centres across Sussex, in particular rural Sussex, and improved access to GP Surgeries that currently exist. Friends, Families and Travellers (2010)

17 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

Racism towards most ethnic minority groups is now hidden, less frequently expressed in public, and widely seen as unacceptable. However, that towards Gypsies and Travellers is still common, frequently overt and seen as justified. Abusive media coverage and overtly racist statements from local and national politicians add to the ignorance and prejudice of many members of the settled population, while those in authority frequently fail to challenge them. Complaints abound from members of the communities included in this review: of services being not welcoming or refused; of employment offers being withdrawn; and of people being harassed in or dismissed from
Show more

53 Read more

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE IMPLEMENTATION AND HARMONIZATION OF NATIONAL POLICIES ON ROMA, SINTI AND TRAVELLERS: GUIDELINES FOR A COMMON VISION

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE IMPLEMENTATION AND HARMONIZATION OF NATIONAL POLICIES ON ROMA, SINTI AND TRAVELLERS: GUIDELINES FOR A COMMON VISION

b) Mr. Claude Cahn (ERRC) on crisis issues related to the right of adequate housing in Central& Southeastern Europe c) Mrs. Anne-Marie Cukovic (Serbia and Montenegro) on how to regulate the property and legal status of housing facilities, and finalise urban planning regulations in Roma settlements

5 Read more

Housing Gypsies

Housing Gypsies

“I was brought up on Rover Way Caravan Site and when I was sixteen my mother [a single parent] died and although I had a brother of eighteen, I was in charge of the whole family – five of us. Neither my brother nor me were old enough to stay on the pitch, so we had to move. We went to my Gran’s in Crewe in a house for a few months and then went onto my Auntie’s pitch for a while, but we couldn’t stay there because there were too many vans on the one pitch. Then we had a private house but the landlord didn’t pay his mortgage so we were evicted. We went through homelessness and we were put in Roundwood for a while but someone tried to break in so we wanted to move. [X] from the Sites Group got us this house here and we’ve been here for three years. It’s okay but I really want to move back to the Caravan Site. I am waiting for a pitch on Shirenewton to come up but we’ve got to wait until someone moves or dies. We didn’t travel a lot before when we lived on the site, but we knew that we could if we wanted to and if people can’t do it, they’ll want to do it even more. I don’t think they’ll ever get Gypsies into houses.”
Show more

38 Read more

The impact of discourses of authenticity on the development and application of statutory definitions of gypsies and travellers; A study of their legal access to accommodation in England and Wales since 1959

The impact of discourses of authenticity on the development and application of statutory definitions of gypsies and travellers; A study of their legal access to accommodation in England and Wales since 1959

due  to  the  spiritual  practices  of  some  of  the  older  generation.  They  are  not  classified  as   an  ethnic  minority  and  as  such  are  not  accorded  the  same  protection  as  ethnic  Gypsies   and  Travellers  under  the  RRA  1976  and  the  EA  2010.  There  are  now  2-­‐3  generations  of   New  Travellers  in  the  UK  and  abroad.  It  is  a  community  which  has  established  itself,  and   has  been  recognised  by  the  both  the  government  and  the  courts  (see  sections  8.4.1  and   8.5.2).  This  is  in  contrast  to  the  controversy  evident  in  the  media  in  the  early  nineties   noted  by  Halfacree,  (1996)  where  New  ‘age’  Travellers  were  seen  as  a  threat  to  the  moral   well  being  of  society,  and  something  which  the  state  should  act  against.  The  discourse  in   the  media  was  also  reflected  in  the  statutory  and  judicial  discourse  of  the  time,  and  the   Criminal  Justice  and  Public  Order  Act  1994  (CJPOA  1994)  and  the  case  of  Ex  Parte  Gibb   (see  sections  7.1.2  and  7.1.1)  are  representative  of  this.  Further  to  this,  the  majority  of   the  academic  work  with  regard  to  New  Travellers  was  produced  around  this  time.   Hetherington’s  (2000)  work  on  ‘New  Age  Travellers’  in  the  UK  carried  out  between  1990   and  1993  provides  a  romanticised  and  arguably  naïve  account  of  the  culture,  which  failed   to  take  into  consideration  some  of  the  realities  faced  by  the  community  with  regard  to   living  conditions  and  other  social  factors.  This  account  is  later  discredited  by  Martin   (1998,  2002),  who  argues  that  there  are  in  effect  two  generations  of  New  Traveller,  the   second  of  which  were  forced  onto  the  road  through  the  economic  circumstances  of  the   time  (for  example,  mass  unemployment)  as  opposed  to  the  account  of  Hetherington,   which  suggested  that  people  took  to  the  road  for  more  idealistic  reasons.  James  (2005,   2006,  and  2007)  has  produced  a  number  of  articles  detailing  the  interactions  of  New   Travellers  and  the  Police  with  regard  to  the  provisions  of  the  CJPOA  1994.  Halfacree   (1996),  has  produced  work  on  the  place  of  New  Travellers  in  rural  areas  and  has  
Show more

339 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

10.22 Local authorities should have an understanding of and be sensitive to the distinct ethos and needs of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. It is important that these families who are educating their children at home are treated in the same way as any other families in that position. Home education should not be regarded as less appropriate than in other communities. When a Gypsy, Roma and Traveller family with children of school age move into an area, they should be strongly encouraged to contact the local Traveller Education Support Service for advice if one is in place, or the authority’s admissions team for help to access local educational settings if school places are desired. Further guidance can be obtained from the DfE’s report: Improving the outcomes for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller’s pupils. The Advisory Council for the Education of Romany and other Travellers is another source of information. 184
Show more

79 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

10.22 Local authorities should have an understanding of and be sensitive to the distinct ethos and needs of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. It is important that these families who are educating their children at home are treated in the same way as any other families in that position. Home education should not be regarded as less appropriate than in other communities. When a Gypsy, Roma and Traveller family with children of school age move into an area, they should be strongly encouraged to contact the local Traveller Education Support Service for advice if one is in place, or the authority’s admissions team for help to access local educational settings if school places are desired. Further guidance can be obtained from the DfE’s report: Improving the outcomes for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller’s pupils. The Advisory Council for the Education of Romany and other Travellers is another source of information. 184
Show more

79 Read more

" I Even Met Happy Gypsies " : Life Satisfaction of Roma Youth in the Balkans

" I Even Met Happy Gypsies " : Life Satisfaction of Roma Youth in the Balkans

    The   purpose   of   this   paper   is   to   study   the   determinants   of   the   self-­‐reported   life   satisfaction  of  Roma  young  adults  living  in  settlements  and  to  investigate  whether  there  is   any  difference  in  the  well-­‐being  of  Roma  and  non-­‐Roma.  Our  empirical  study  is  based  on  an   usually  rich  household  survey,  the  fourth  global  round  of  Multiple  Indicator  Cluster  Survey   (MICS4   hereafter),   conducted   in   Serbia   in   2010   and   in   Bosnia   and   Herzegovina   (BiH   hereafter)  in  2011  by  the  United  Nations  Children’s  Fund.  In  the  context  of  The  Decade  of   Roma   inclusion   2005-­‐2015,   studying   the   perceptions   of   Roma   young   adults   versus   non-­‐ Roma   regarding   their   life   satisfaction   seems   particularly   relevant   for   policy   makers   in   understanding  on  what  matters  in  terms  of  well-­‐being 1 .  How  do  Roma  young  adults  living  in   settlements  perceive  their  current  life  satisfaction  compared  to  the  mainstream  population?   How  can  we  explain  their  life  satisfaction?  Are  the  Roma  young  adults  more  optimistic  or   pessimistic  about  their  future  than  non-­‐Roma?    
Show more

39 Read more

Is nomadism the ‘problem’? The social construction of Gypsies and Travellers as perpetrators of ‘anti social’ behaviour in Britain

Is nomadism the ‘problem’? The social construction of Gypsies and Travellers as perpetrators of ‘anti social’ behaviour in Britain

Coverage of sites has created, arguably, the worst excesses of racism in Parliament and the British national print and broadcasting press (Turner, 2002; Halfacree, 2006; Holloway, 2005), with The Sun’s ‘Stamp on the Camps’ campaign (2005) creating a furore both inside and outside Parliament. The campaign was prompted by a then draft Labour government circular which was depicted as evidence that the government (and John Prescott in particular, as Deputy Prime Minister) was ‘going soft’ on Gypsies and Travellers and giving them ‘special treatment’ to create ‘eyesores’ in the countryside (Barkham, 2005). Seemingly, the automatic equation in the minds of the public of the presence of Gypsies and Travellers with anti-social behaviour was revealed in an ICM poll for The Sunday Express (‘Cut council tax bill if Gypsies can live near our houses,’ Sunday Express 23 January 2005, 50). It suggested that almost three-quarters of ‘householders’ believed they should pay lower council tax if Gypsies ‘set up camp’ nearby and that they should get a reduction to compensate for any slump in their house prices caused by ‘gypsy blight.’ More than a third were ‘incensed’ at current government policy and law enforcement, believing ‘gypsies have more rights than others to set up home wherever they choose;’ while 63 per cent said ‘Labour’s stance on gypsies’ was ‘lacking in common sense’ and ‘ruled by political correctness and fear of accusations of racism.’
Show more

20 Read more

'You likes your way, we got our own way': Gypsies and Travellers' views on infant feeding and health professional support

'You likes your way, we got our own way': Gypsies and Travellers' views on infant feeding and health professional support

Given the poor health outcomes experienced by Gypsies and Travellers, it is important to explore their views on the services they receive from health providers and to establish their primary health needs. It has been noted that Roma women are often overlooked in health research due to dual discrimination, both eth- nic and gender, within and outside the commu- nity, 19 and there is currently little qualitative research exploring women’s views on maternal and child health and the health services pro- vided. The UK Healthy Child Progamme 20 stipulates that mothers should be visited ante- natally to support infant feeding and that post- natal visits should promote breast-feeding, with introduction of solids foods at around 6 months, as recommended by the World Health Organization. 21 Encouraging engage- ment with children’s preventive health services has been recognized as the starting place for reducing health inequalities among Gypsies and Travellers, particularly in the area of nutri- tion. 11 How a baby is fed in the first year of life has an impact upon health in the long and short term. 21–23 Breast-fed babies are less likely to experience morbidity in the first year of life 24 and to have a reduced risk of diabetes, hypertension and obesity in later life. 25 Health benefits for mothers who breast-feed include a reduced risk of breast and ovarian cancer and type 2 diabetes. 24
Show more

12 Read more

Civilising offensives and ambivalence : the case of British Gypsies

Civilising offensives and ambivalence : the case of British Gypsies

The academic debates played out in relation to the (de)civilising of punishment are helpful in highlighting the importance of the development of sensibilities and how this is reflected in public policy (see Garland, 1991). However, in terms of the focus here, that is the state’s civilising project against Gypsies, it is useful to turn to van Krieken’s (1999) work on the Australian state’s response to the indigenous population and what he terms ‘the systematic removal of indigenous Australian children from their families’ (this has also been cited as an extreme stance proffered with respect to Gypsy children in the nineteenth century in Britain (Vanderbeck, 2005, p.78)) which was made possible through legislation passed in the early twentieth century. The Australian state’s approach included the governance of Aboriginal movements and the ‘rescue’ of the rising generation by forcible removal from their families. Absorption and assimilation into the ways of civilisation were the key concepts around which this discourse was organized (van Krieken, 1999, p.307). For van Krieken the firm belief that this policy was contributing to the welfare of the indigenous population raises the possibility that civilisation and decivilisation interpenetrate so that ‘societies are barbaric precisely in their movement towards increasing civilization’ (van Krieken, 1999, p.297). Like Burkitt (1996) he argues that civilisation should be seen as an inherently ambivalent process with the potential to unleash barbaric forces on a large scale. This ambivalence is expressed and clearly discernible in the concept of the civilising offensive:
Show more

13 Read more

Preventing malaria in travellers

Preventing malaria in travellers

been recommended as second line prophylaxis. How- ever, it is contraindicated in those with glucose-6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, and this enzyme must be checked before the drug is prescribed. Although not currently recommended in the UK, primaquine may be useful for short trips in travellers who have contraindications to other antimalarials.

5 Read more

Health advice for travellers

Health advice for travellers

Many companies offer health insurance for travellers. You can often buy policies online and prices are very competitive. But it is always worth checking with your travel agent, insurance company or bank to see if the level of cover being offered is adequate. If you are travelling on business, your company will probably already have insurance that covers you – but again, you should check to see whether it is adequate and whether you need to take out extra insurance. Some credit and charge card companies provide some insurance cover for cardholders. If you have this, check carefully to see what’s covered and what isn’t.
Show more

68 Read more

Translators: Travellers, Not Tourists

Translators: Travellers, Not Tourists

One thing is certain: when translating (for children or any other reader), the translator no doubt needs a thorough knowledge of both the source and the target culture to re-create a text that enables the Slovenian readers to enjoy reading, and to gain some (inter- or cross-) cultural knowledge. Or, to round the article up with a metaphor: the TV chef Andrew Zimmern once advised his audiences to avoid being mere tourists, since looking beyond what’s right in front of one’s nose is “the key to understanding this amazing world we live in”. To be a traveller, not a tourist, is what’s of importance. In the rich landscapes of the texts, translators are definitely travellers.
Show more

14 Read more

Meteorology for travellers Title

Meteorology for travellers Title

Smoky is a frequent air traveller. As a reporter, she moves around Central Asia, South-East Asia and Australia. She knows all about the weather and has experienced more diversions and delays from low visibility at airports caused by smoke haze, fog and dust- storms than from the exciting weather many travellers worry about—such as thunderstorms, tropical cyclones, etc. Smoky’s next assignment will take her to Dhaka, Bangladesh, and then north to Central Asia.

7 Read more

Big Bang Localism and Gypsies and Travelers

Big Bang Localism and Gypsies and Travelers

In order to reveal the pitfalls of a localist approach in terms of increasing site provision and contributing to community cohesion the paper will look in depth at the localism policy which was introduced through Planning Circular 1/94. The lack of compulsion meant few local authorities initiated serious measures to provide sites. Instead, prejudice and fears, mainly articulated through public opposition, made many councils reluctant to help (Richardson, 2007). Councilors were often fearful that support for sites would lead to local electorates punishing them at the ballot box; those who were to some degree sympathetic bemoaned the fact that they were not being compelled to act by a statutory duty as this enabled them to direct the blame at central government and declare they had no choice. Another impediment to local authorities being proactive in increasing site provision was the fear of the ’honeypot’ effect, a belief that if they acted and neighboring local authorities did not then their authority would attract larger numbers of Gypsies and Travelers who would become an accommodation and service ’burden’ (ODPM, 2004). Clearly such fears are more pronounced under a localist planning regime as opposed to one where all authorities are compelled to act in unison.
Show more

19 Read more

Show all 576 documents...