Harry Potter and the chamber of secrets

Top PDF Harry Potter and the chamber of secrets:

Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets pdf

"But you're Muggles!" said Mr. Weasley delightedly. "We must have a drink! What's that you've got there? Oh, you're changing Muggle money. Molly, look!" He pointed excitedly at the tenpound notes in Mr. Granger's hand. "Meet you back here," Ron said to Hermione as the Weasleys and Harry were led off to their underground vaults by another Gringotts goblin. The vaults were reached by means of small, goblin-driven carts that sped along miniature train tracks through the bank's underground tunnels. Harry enjoyed the breakneck journey down to the Weasleys' vault, but felt dreadful, far worse than he had in Knockturn Alley, when it was opened. There was a very small pile of silver Sickles inside, and just one gold Galleon.
Show more

205 Read more

The currency of heroic fantasy : The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter from ideology to industry : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English at Massey University

The currency of heroic fantasy : The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter from ideology to industry : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English at Massey University

Hermione and her mentor Minerva McGonagall insist that the gift be treated with caution. They rightly suspect the stick is from Sirius Black who is believed at that time to be plotting to kill Harry; any present, therefore, could endanger the young wizard. Within the wizarding world the risk of being hurt by a gift is an accepted possibility. In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Mr Weasley remonstrates with his daughter for using what turns out to be Voldemort’s childhood diary: “Haven’t I taught you anything? What have I always told you? Never trust anything that can think for itself if you can’t see where it keeps its brain … A suspicious object like that, it was clearly full of dark magic!” (242-3, italics in original). Material objects in the wizarding world are much more than
Show more

493 Read more

Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial
practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

This fantasy series consists of seven books published between 1997 and 2007. It begins with Harry as an infant, who is left in the care of his ‘Muggle’, or non-magical, relatives, Aunt Petunia and Uncle Vernon. In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (1997), Harry joins Hogwarts boarding School of Witchcraft and Wizardry as a first-year student at the age of eleven; here he meets his friends Ron and Hermione. The second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (1998), follows Harry’s struggle to save Ginny, who is kidnapped and taken into the Chamber of Secrets by Lord Voldemort. The third novel, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1999), follows Harry’s third year in the school, where he meets some faithful old friends of his parents, including Sirius Black, and some traitors who betrayed his family, such as Peter Pettigrew, who was Lord Voldemort’s servant. In his fourth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2000), Harry takes part in a dangerous competition called the Triwizard Tournament; by the end of this book Lord Voldemort has regained his full strength. In his fifth year at Hogwarts, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003), Harry and his friends encounter and nearly defeat Lord Voldemort’s Death Eaters. In the sixth book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), Harry discovers that Voldemort became immortal through his creation of six ‘horcruxes’ where parts of his soul are kept within objects. Two of these horcruxes have been destroyed: one by Harry in the events of the Chamber of Secrets and the other by Dumbledore, Hogwarts’ headmaster, before the events of Half-Blood Prince. The final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007), follows Harry’s development and maturation to the age of 17. With the help of his friends and supporters, Harry finally defeats Lord Voldemort and his followers and saves the wizard world.
Show more

509 Read more

Frazer, Wittgenstein and Harry Potter: an approach to the ritual manipulation of images

Frazer, Wittgenstein and Harry Potter: an approach to the ritual manipulation of images

I want to suggest that Harry Potter can help to focus the issue. I have in mind the episode at the opening of the second book in the series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. As usual, the book opens in the household of the Dursley family, Harry's unwilling guardians. An argument has broken out about the nocturnal disturbances created by Harry's owl, but the thread is broken by his cousin Dudley's demands for more bacon for his breakfast. He tells Harry to pass the frying pan and Harry replies «You've forgotten the magic word». The result is uproar in the household and Harry quickly clarifies «I meant "please"!», but it takes some time for the fuss to die down 25 . In the context of the book this is simply a joke, playing on Harry's ability to do «real» magic and the conventional English witticism naming «please» a «magic» word. But I want to suggest that it is a productive passage. The rituals of human societies, including the image rituals of Giuliano Guizzelmi, are much more like saying «please» than they are like the magic of Rowling's wizards. Indeed, as I have argued
Show more

12 Read more

The Harry Potter Effect: Understanding the Crossover Appeal of Bestselling  Young Adult Literature

The Harry Potter Effect: Understanding the Crossover Appeal of Bestselling Young Adult Literature

Word-of-mouth praise about Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone began flying soon after the book’s 1997 publication in the U.K. (where it went by the title Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone). American readers sought out the British version of the second volume of the series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, before it became available in the U.S. (Maughan, 1999, pg. 92). The instant popularity of the books among both children and adults led certain members of the literati to bemoan “the infantilization of reading culture” (Cart, 2009, pg. 74; see Safire, 2000; Byatt, 2003; Travis, 2005), though this additional publicity may only have served to increase the profile of the series. British publishers have simultaneously released editions of the books for young and adult readers; the adult editions have covers that are less likely to embarrass their readers on the subway or in line at the post office (Cart, 2009, pg. 74). American publishers, in addition to the major chain bookstores, insist the approach of simultaneous publishing won’t work here to address the problem of how to reach both adult and young adult audiences (Cart, 2009, pg. 75).
Show more

50 Read more

Narrative Brought to Life: The Wizarding World of Harry Potter

Narrative Brought to Life: The Wizarding World of Harry Potter

In addition to the mediated experience of film, many viewers also crave an embodied environment that can further enhance the experience of understanding a text or filmic narrative. Although I’ve already noted that many readers of The Chamber of Secrets would like to step into the more embodied environment of the narrative, this desire is not limited to those reading Harry Potter books, as similar desires have been seen throughout history. Various forms of immersive spaces have facilitated the desire to be transported to a different place, to witness history, or to see a story come to life. Film and television have attempted to fulfill the desire for a new mode of mediated experience in the past century, yet these modes focus on the visual sense and do not fully immerse viewers in the world of the story. In this respect, they are physically passive experiences, despite the fact that they can “feel” physically immersive. For example, IMAX theatre technology allows viewers to sit motionless, but feel as though they are part of a different environment. IMAX means “Image Maximization,” and the IMAX theatre “immerse[s] spectators in the represented space and give[s] them a heightened sensation of moving out of the immediate and into the hyper-real.” 8 The IMAX and cyber-technology in video games are forms that virtually transport viewers into a new space that is perceivably real.
Show more

103 Read more

Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

“Males are represented more often, but they are also depicted as wiser, braver, more powerful, and more fun than females” (ibid.). Female powerlessness is most evident in the portrayal of Hermione, who often shows signs of fear. As an example Heilman cites the attack of the mountain troll when the boys have to save Hermione because she is merely crouching helplessly under the sink and screaming (Rowling 1999, 132). Heilman argues, somewhat inaccurately, that Hermione is supposed to be exceptionally intelligent, but not brave or daring. Further, her knowledge is only of use to the boys while she does not know how to use it or cannot use it. This can be explained through the understanding of Harry Potter as a mythic hero. Both Hermione and Ron are only helping Harry since he is the principal protagonist of the story (Nikolajeva 2003, 127). Although Heilman draws attention to such instances as the Polyjuice Potion which helps the boys to sneak into the Slytherin House, it does not work on Hermione so she has to stay behind; or when Hermione becomes ‘petrified’ but still manages to aid Harry and Ron with the help of a note in her hand which reveals the secret of Salazar’s successor. It is important to stress that in the final battle Harry always fights alone because Ron also fails half way. This happens at the end of each book: in The Philosopher’s Stone Ron sacrifices himself on the chessboard and Harry confronts Squirrel alone; in The Chamber of Secrets the ceiling of the tunnel collapses and Ron remains trapped; in The Prisoner of Azkaban Hermione helps Harry rescue Black and Buckbeak while Ron rests injured in the infirmary; in The Goblet of Fire Harry confronts Lord Voldemort while Ron and Hermione watch the competition from the stands for the spectators; in The Order of Phoenix Harry has several helpers, among them Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Neville, and Luna; in the sixth book, The Half-Blood Prince, Ron and Hermione stay at Hogwarts while Harry joins Dumbledore in his search for a part of Lord Voldemort’s soul. Another proof of Hermione’s bravery and daring is the scene in The Chamber of Secrets when she tries to convince the boys they should make the Polyjuice Potion:
Show more

12 Read more

2016-Potter

2016-Potter

(3) The middle Holocene culture associated with notched bifaces is broadly termed the Northern Archaic tradition (Palisades, Portage, Taye Lake, and Aishihik phases), and variants include Minchumina and Brooks Range traditions and Tuktu complex (Esdale 2008; Holmes 1986; Schoenberg 1995). Microblades have been variably assigned to this complex (Ackerman 2004; Anderson 1988; Dixon 1985; Esdale 2008; Holmes 1986; Potter 2008b; Schoenberg 1995; Workman 1978). While some have argued for a “pure” (i.e., nonmicroblade) Northern Archaic (Palisades complex) and a “mixed” Northern Archaic (with microblades) (Tuktu complex) (Ackerman 2004; Anderson 1988; Clark 1994), recent analyses of large site samples suggest a single cultural tradition with variable presence of micro- blade technology (Esdale 2008; Potter 2008b). Associated artifacts include notched, stemmed, and lanceolate projectile points, large asymmetrical semilu- nar bifacial knives, notched cobbles (presumed net- sinkers), and wedge- shaped and tabular microblade cores. The Annie Lake complex (defined by concave- based lanceolate points) may be related to this middle Holocene group (Greer 1993; Hare 1995). The Northern Archaic is geographically distributed throughout interior regions of northwest North America as well as coastal sites in northern and northwest Alaska. Associated artifact types extend across the Northwest Territories, Canada, linked with the Taltheilei tradition (Gordon 1996) and per- haps with Pointed Mountain and Mackenzie complexes (Morrison 1987). Thus, the Northern Archaic tradition is geographically isomorphic with the preced- ing Denali complex/ Paleoarctic tradition, except for absence of the former in southern coastal areas. There appears to be more regional variation than with the preceding traditions; variants include Palisades and Portage phases in north- west Alaska (notched and oblanceolate points respectively along with absence of microblades), Taye Lake phase in southwest Yukon (with tabular microblade cores and notched bifaces), and Julian complex in Northwest Territories (with blade cores, notched and triangular points).
Show more

26 Read more

AN ANALYSIS OF SPEECH ACT USED IN HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE MOVIE

AN ANALYSIS OF SPEECH ACT USED IN HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE MOVIE

There are some genres of movie namely action, adventure, animated, comedies, drama, tragedies, family, horror, romantic, thrillers, fantasy, etc. Based on its history, the first movie commercially published in 1895 and nowadays there were lots of movies have been produced. In this study, the researcher interested to analyze speech act used in a fantasy movie entitled Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire movie was published in 2005 which directed by Mike Newell and produced by Warner Bros. Pictures. This movie was the fourth sequel of the Harry Potter movie series which is actually adapted from J.K. Rowling’s novel with the same title. The script of this movie is written by Steve Kloves.
Show more

11 Read more

Mixing memory and desire: recollecting the self in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

Mixing memory and desire: recollecting the self in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

represents the intense human struggle for both power and wisdom, recognition and introspection, grandeur and honour” (Pharr 54, italics in original). Very few of us are able to reach the balance of such dualisms, but they endure as goals to guide us towards our Possible Selves. This is because “the economical function of myth is to represent in liveable form the structure of the complexities through which we must find our way” (Bruner, On Knowing 33). The hero‟s story has the „thousand faces‟ made famous by Campbell‟s work, but it is still a story, that is, a narrative progression by which things happen to produce, to influence, and to demonstrate the hero in action. In this sense, the story always educates the hero, but when the story is also about the specific education of the hero, as in Harry Potter, it touches “one of the archetypal patterns of fantastic children‟s literature” (Maguire qtd. in Pharr 54). And when a work of what is primarily deemed as children‟s literature strikes a chord with readers of all ages, everyone joins in the pattern. The concept of Jungian archetypes will be discussed in various places in this chapter in an attempt to offer a possible, but by no means exclusive, interpretation of these patterns.
Show more

122 Read more

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

There are two different types of place names that occur in the Harry Potter movies, British existing places and British fictional places. British existing place names that are mentioned in the movies are, for instance, London, Bristol, King’s Cross railway station, Surry, Yorkshire, Little Whinging, etc. The subtitling strategy that is most often used to deal with place names is direct transfer ‘preservation’. The Arabic translator did not change the British setting. All the English names of existing places are transliterated, without adding any explanation about the location. As most of the action takes place at Hogwarts, the existing place names are not of much relevance. Therefore, there is no need to provide the target audience with additional information. However, most Arab audiences, especially children, have never heard of these English places, and this might add to their knowledge of British topography.
Show more

112 Read more

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

The primary data for this study is the Harry Potter movies (produced from 2001 to 2011) containing Arabic subtitling, i.e. for which there is an international version on DVD subtitled into Arabic. The data consists of all CRs collected in the whole series with their Arabic subtitles. The CRs are divided into groups and subgroups: names of major and minor characters, animals, magical objects, spells and potions, food, neologisms and other CRs. In the analysis, the main focus will be on CRs that are important and significant for the purpose of the study. Each category will be discussed in detail, supporting the analysis in the conclusion. The method used in the analysis is descriptive, however, in some cases more explanation analysis is provided. Also, in the analysis, the suggested typology of CRs will be used. Because the data contains several semantically loaded or meaningful names and other CRs, a central question in the analysis is whether they are understandable to the target audience, especially if they are retained in their original form, i.e. transliterated.
Show more

194 Read more

2002-Potter-APUA

2002-Potter-APUA

This effort to correlate the different stratigraphic profiles generated by various researchers at the Gerstle River over the past 25 years underscores the importance of producing detailed excavation reports. Further excavation at the Upper Locus will probably answer questions regarding artifact distribution and may shed light on the stratigraphic and dating problems of earlier researchers, but may not be able to reveal the actual stratigraphic position of the radiocarbon dates obtained during the 1983-1985 excavations. Soil auguring between the 1983-1985 excavation blocks and the 1996 test pits could resolve some of the stratigraphic problems. A number of new radiocarbon dates on precisely provenienced samples would help reconcile the various interpretations of the stratigraphic sequence in the Upper Locus; the resulting data would then in fact replace (rather than help reconstruct) the previous interpretations of radiocarbon dates and strata. As noted above, these correlations are provisional and should be tested as new analytical data in the form of testing, radiocarbon assays with good provenience, and new stratigraphic profiles become available. Lithic, faunal, spatial, and sediment analyses are ongoing for the Lower Locus, and preliminary results indicate significant spatial patterning of artifacts, features, and fauna that probably delineate activity areas (Potter 2000). The plan-view data for the Upper Locus (A and G-grids) indicates that similar artifact clusters were encountered there, especially within Component III. The vertical distribution data from both loci suggests very little post-depositional disturbance and the coincidence of radiometrically dated
Show more

32 Read more

Portraying the Protagonists: A Study of the Use of Adjectives in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Portraying the Protagonists: A Study of the Use of Adjectives in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Thus, the present study was conducted to gauge the validity of whether character portrayal in the Harry Potter series could be the main reason in seizing the readers’ attention instead of marketing techniques done by global corporations. This study is done by analyzing three main protagonists in the final novel of the Harry Potter series which is the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. It incorporates two concepts which is stylistic analysis and corpus analysis, where the corpora of the final Harry Potter novel is analyzed based on these two approaches to study one linguistic feature, which is adjectives that was used by Rowling in describing the three main protagonists in the final novel. The results of the adjectives analyzed are then categorized into three smaller segments for easier scrutiny which are features, emotions and traits. Finally, from these results, the researcher analyzeswether the usage of the frequently recurring adjective could contribute to the depiction of protagonist as heroic characters.
Show more

6 Read more

The crucifixion of consumerism and power and the resurrection of a community glimpsed through  Meylahn’s wounded Christ in conversation with Rowling’s Christ discourse in the  Harry Potter  series

The crucifixion of consumerism and power and the resurrection of a community glimpsed through Meylahn’s wounded Christ in conversation with Rowling’s Christ discourse in the Harry Potter series

It is because of the actions of Dumbledore and Snape that Harry understands the depth of these men’s integrity, helping him to completely accept who they were, and the pivotal role they had in who he has become: this also allows Harry the courage to accept who he is, to truly know himself and his self-worth. All these aspects of the other characters narratives (including the sacrifices of Dobby and Lily), have been woven into Harry’s personal narrative, becoming a part of his identity and thus his spirituality. These aspects of narrative have served to keep Harry humble, as he now knows that great men are not born, but struggle to wisdom. Dumbledore was devastated by guilt, but once he has confessed to Harry at King’s Cross he is free of that guilt. Ironically this burden that each is carrying also makes them the exceptional people they are. In other words, suffering and overcoming that suffering may lead to Christ-like actions. The humility gained by Harry shows the reader that by accepting others as they are and by them accepting you as you are, the opportunity presents itself instantaneously to truly know Christ through another person without being
Show more

7 Read more

Fred Zacharias and a Lawyer's Attempt To Be Guided by Justice: Flying With Harry Potter and Understanding How Lawyers Can Prosecute the People They Represent

Fred Zacharias and a Lawyer's Attempt To Be Guided by Justice: Flying With Harry Potter and Understanding How Lawyers Can Prosecute the People They Represent

In fact, in the final two books of the Harry Potter series, readers are confronted with the aims of two concrete systems of justice. The first of these to be discussed can be found in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. 27 In that book, Harry is called upon to judge his friend Ron Weasley by a forest pond. Ron has just returned to Harry and their mutual friend Hermione Granger after Ron abandoned his two friends in the midst of a desperate mission all three shared. 28 Left alone without Ron’s help, Harry and Hermione were almost killed. 29 Now, confronted with this task of judging Ron, Harry creates a justice system that allows for Ron’s redemption and facilitates a way for him to be restored to his friendships with Harry and Hermione.
Show more

19 Read more

Potter

Potter

monitoring techniques and analytical methods, including forest health data (Smith and Conkling 2004), soils as an indicator of forest health (O’Neill and others 2005), urban forest health monitoring (Cumming and others 2006, 2007; Lake and others 2006), health conditions in national forests (Morin and others 2006), crown conditions (Schomaker and others 2007, Randolph 2010, Randolph and Moser 2009), sampling and estimation procedures for vegetation diversity and structure (Schulz and others 2009), ozone monitoring (Rose and Coulston 2009), establishment of alien- invasive forest insect species (Koch and others 2011), spatial patterns of land cover (Riitters 2011), changes in forest biodiversity (Potter and Woodall 2012), and the overall forest health indicator program (Woodall and others 2010). For more information, visit the FHM Web site at www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/fhm.
Show more

11 Read more

Of language, limits, and secrets

Of language, limits, and secrets

365 365 365 365 defacement? Does it destroy the secret, or further empower it? For are not shared secrets the basis of our social institutions, the workplace, the market, the family, and the state? Is not such public secrecy the most interesting, the most powerful, the most mischievous and ubiquitous form of socially active knowledge there is… Defacement is like Enlightenment. It brings insides outside, unearthing knowledge, and revealing mystery. As it does this, however, as it spoliates and tears at tegument, it may also animate the thing defaced and the mystery revealed may become more mysterious, indicating the curious magic upon which Enlightenment, in its elimination of magic depends… Defacement works on objects the way jokes work on language, bringing out their inherent magic nowhere more so than when those objects have become routinized and social… (p.2-5, emphasis in original)
Show more

15 Read more

“We Are Only as Strong as We Are United, as Weak as We Are Divided” a Dynamic Analysis of the Peer Support Networks in the Harry Potter Books

“We Are Only as Strong as We Are United, as Weak as We Are Divided” a Dynamic Analysis of the Peer Support Networks in the Harry Potter Books

Contact between the 64 Hogwarts students was coded as peer support when one of the four types of peer support, described in Tardy’s model, were found: 1) Student A supports student B emotionally, e.g., in Book 1: Harry, Ron and Hermione assure Neville that he is definitely a Gryffindor when he doubts he is not brave enough to be part of the house; 2) Student A gives students B instru- mental help; e.g., in Book 1: Fred and George Weasley help Harry Potter to get his trunk into the compartment of the Hogwarts Express; 3) Student A gives student B certain information to help student B, e.g., in Book 1: Hermione Granger helps Harry Potter with his homework and; 4) Student A praises student B, e.g., in book 5: Terry Boot praises Hermione Granger, for doing a Pro- tean Charm, which is advanced magic.
Show more

12 Read more

Trade Secrets and Whistleblower Protection in the European Union

Trade Secrets and Whistleblower Protection in the European Union

variations on whether there are rules at all about whistleblower protection, whether these rules refer to the public and private sector as well as whether they apply to all policy fields. Furthermore, whereas whistleblower protection is recognized to have an essential accountability role, its significance for the better functioning and competitive- ness of the internal market is not emphasized. The debate about the Trade Secrets Di- rective and critical discussions before its adoption focused mostly on juxtaposing trade secrets protection and whistleblower protection. In light of arguments in Section 2 of this Insight, indeed it is clear that there are tensions between these two regimes. How- ever, it is argued here that their rationales are not necessarily as opposed and their functionality could be ensured if both legal frameworks are well established in the EU. Since trade secrets protection implies concealing information and whistleblowing means disclosing it, it seems self-evident that they are opposed to each other and it would be difficult to imagine how both regimes can be ensured concurrently. However, another important aspect to examine about these protections is not only how they function, but also why they are utilised and in this latter aspect, they do not necessarily have conflicting rationales. Namely, trade secrets were described by the Commission to be valuable for providing incentives to growth and innovation in the internal market. Similarly, although whistleblower protection is focused at protecting an individual, its contribution is to also establish a working environment that encourages exposure of acts that would be damaging for a company.
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...