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Supporting healthful lifestyles during pregnancy: a health coach intervention pilot study

Supporting healthful lifestyles during pregnancy: a health coach intervention pilot study

In this remote health coach intervention pilot study, we found that we can recruit very effectively, that the interven- tion was acceptable, and that participants reported high sat- isfaction. Although it remains to be tested with a larger study population, the efficient recruitment, remote methods of intervention delivery, and modest research expenses sug- gest scalability of the intervention. Based on the relatively unsuccessful trials using lifestyle interventions during preg- nancy, there is recent interest in targeting at-risk women prior to pregnancy. We feel that some of the lessons learned from this pilot study could be applied to behavioral studies with pregnant women or to pre-pregnancy designs [45, 46]. We propose that future interventions targeting women of reproductive age with excess weight include a supportive, integrated health coach intervention that includes the rest of the health care team to provide one coordinated front to educate and motivate patients. Future interventions should be personalized not only in the approach and content, but also to the women’s preferences in mode of communication and technological tools to support goals tracking.
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Protocol of an ongoing randomized controlled trial of care management for comorbid depression and hypertension: the Chinese Older Adult Collaborations in Health (COACH) study

Protocol of an ongoing randomized controlled trial of care management for comorbid depression and hypertension: the Chinese Older Adult Collaborations in Health (COACH) study

Methods: The Chinese Older Adult Collaborations in Health (COACH) Study is a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the hypotheses that the COACH intervention, designed to manage comorbid depression and hypertension in older adult, rural Chinese primary care patients, will result in better treatment adherence and greater improvement in depressive symptoms and blood pressure control, and better quality of life, than enhanced Care-as- Usual (eCAU). Based on chronic disease management and collaborative care principles, the COACH model integrates the care provided by the older person ’ s primary care provider (PCP) with that delivered by an Aging Worker (AW) from the village ’ s Aging Association, supervised by a psychiatrist consultant. One hundred sixty villages, each of which is served by one PCP, will be randomly selected from two counties in Zhejiang Province and assigned to deliver eCAU or the COACH intervention. Approximately 2400 older adult residents from the selected villages who have both clinically significant depressive symptoms and a diagnosis of hypertension will be recruited into the study, randomized by the villages in which they live and receive primary care. After giving informed consent, they will undergo a baseline research evaluation; receive treatment for 12 months with the approach to which their village was assigned; and be re-evaluated at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after entry. Depression and HTN control are the primary outcomes. Treatment received, health care utilization, and cost data will be obtained from the subjects ’ electronic medical records (EMR) and used to assess adherence to care recommendations and, in a preliminary manner, to establish cost and cost effectiveness of the intervention.
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INSIDE THE BECOME A HEALTH COACH 6-MONTH CERTIFICATION PROGRAM BECOME A HEALTH COACH IN 6 MONTHS! (877) PAGE 1

INSIDE THE BECOME A HEALTH COACH 6-MONTH CERTIFICATION PROGRAM BECOME A HEALTH COACH IN 6 MONTHS! (877) PAGE 1

One of the gifts of becoming a health coach is that the possibilities for what you can do are infinite! Many of our graduates work with clients 1-1 over the phone or in a local office or even on Skype which means that you can see clients all over the world! Other graduates choose to work in a chiropractor’s office or with a Naturopathic Doctor or in a wellness center with other

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Health system context and implementation of evidence-based practices—development and validation of the Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool for low- and middle-income settings

Health system context and implementation of evidence-based practices—development and validation of the Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool for low- and middle-income settings

has been no tool readily available for use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where contextual issues influencing efforts to implement EBPs might include other aspects than those in high-income settings [28, 29]. The objective of the Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) project was to develop and psychomet- rically validate a tool for LMICs to assess aspects of context influencing the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP) [30] that could be used to achieve better insights into the process of implementing EBPs. The name of the tool was chosen to reflect the focus of the project in terms of understanding how health systems context relates to the provision of care to community members. The purpose of the tool is to (1) enhance the opportunities to act on locally identified shortcomings of the health system to in- crease effectiveness, (2) guide planning and promote adap- tation of implementation strategies to the local context and (3) link contextual characteristics to outcome indica- tors of healthcare interventions. Out of the three devel- oped tools developed for high-income settings, the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment [17] assesses all three components of the PARIHS model, i.e. evidence, facilitation and context, and the Context Assess- ment Index [18] has a stronger focus on the individual health worker. Thus, the ACT, which has a stronger focus on assessing organizational aspects of context were per- ceived to be a suitable tool to depart from. Also, similarly to the ACT, we aimed to develop a tool that focused on modifiable aspects of context, i.e. that could be intervened upon [19].
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Peer Health Coach Training Practicum: Evidence from a Flipped Classroom

Peer Health Coach Training Practicum: Evidence from a Flipped Classroom

Health coaching is widely used in worksite, commercial and clinical applications to help individuals adopt and sustain healthy lifestyles. The popularity of health coaching has led to an increased demand for individuals that can effectively provide this service to clients in different settings and contexts. Thus, there is a need for academic programs and coursework to provide this training. A new flipped classroom practicum course was developed to offer undergraduate students the opportunity to learn the important skill of motivational interviewing (MI) commonly used in health coaching. The 16-week, 2-credit course (led by three trained, graduate student health coaches) consists of online video lectures, in-class activities, experiential training, and supervised practicum experiences in health coaching, similar to and based on previously
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Safety Events during an Automated Telephone Self-Management Support Intervention

Safety Events during an Automated Telephone Self-Management Support Intervention

termed “safety triggers” from here forward. The 13 categories for safety triggers included symptoms like pain or side effects, high or low self-reported blood glucose values (i.e., <60 or >300), difficulty with obtaining or adhering to medications, and needing appointments and/or supplies. Whenever a safety trigger occurred throughout the course of the intervention, protocol instructed a lay health coach to follow up with live patient calls to check in about their diabetes self-care and management and to refer serious issues for additional attention. For this analysis, we reviewed the health coach notes for every safety trigger and removed all records that were falsely triggered, such as those that represented an error in entering numbers through the phone. Because every call was recorded in our database, we were able to assess the exact nature of the call and the follow-up recommendations provided by the health coach.
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Foundations of Behavioral Health

Foundations of Behavioral Health

Each youth is informed the Health Coach service will involve the following information gathering and service activities: (1) sociodemographic (e.g., age, living arrangement); (2) alcohol and other substance use (Texas Christian University Drug Screen V (Institute of Behavioral Research, 2014)) as well as collecting a urine specimen for substance use analysis; (3) split testing of the urine specimen for STD testing (i.e., chlamydia and gonorrhea) with free confidential follow-up treatment by the DOH if indicated; (4) screening for HIV, with follow-up, DOH confirmatory testing and treatment; (5) completion of a screen to identify a need for hepatitis C testing and treatment of all positive youth is available; (6) sexual behavior; (7) depression (Melchior, Huba, Brown, & Reback, 1993); (8) linking youth with a primary healthcare physician, if they do not have one, at a local family healthcare center; (9) completion of an online sexually transmitted disease risk-reduction intervention; (10) follow-up phone calls by Health Coaches to monitor their health behavior and need for additional services; and (11) randomly selected youth will receive a 6-month follow-up assessment. Youths testing positive for any drug or with an elevated depression score (7+) are promptly referred to an on-site therapist for follow-up care. Each participating youth is informed he/she will be eligible for one of five $100 gift cards to be determined before Christmas each year.
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A technology-assisted health coaching intervention vs. enhanced usual care for Primary Care-Based Obesity Treatment: a randomized controlled trial

A technology-assisted health coaching intervention vs. enhanced usual care for Primary Care-Based Obesity Treatment: a randomized controlled trial

coach would be able to follow the same two or three participants throughout the intervention in order to en- hance rapport between participant and health coach and facilitate continuity of conversation. Some volunteers had difficulty committing to a regular weekly schedule and the one-year requirement while others finished their commitment to the program in the middle of the study. Challenges with scheduling affected continuity of coaching, sometimes necessitating multiple health coaches per partici- pant, while reducing the total number of calls conducted. During phase 2, we placed greater emphasis on the align- ment of schedules between the assigned health coach and GEM participant and calls were monitored daily to ensure completion. These changes increased the number of calls completed in phase two and decreased the number of coa- ches needed per GEM participant. For future studies, we have instituted weekly health coach meetings with the health coaching team to review quality and fidelity of recorded counseling sessions as well as to discuss difficult cases. Given the high correlation between coaching calls and weight loss, health coaches now work in pairs to increase call completion with one coach designated as the primary coach and the other as the secondary to cover calls when the primary coach is unavailable. We also standardized and improved the health coach training which we anticipate will lead to improved weight loss outcomes. We added 15 additional hours of training (40 h total) to include more role-play and mock coaching sessions under the supervisor of a lead health coach. Health coaches are now required to pass a coaching exam before being assigned GEM participants.
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We Constructed Goals (2004) 4/24/2014. Wellness Adventure: The Journey of the Town of Mount Pleasant

We Constructed Goals (2004) 4/24/2014. Wellness Adventure: The Journey of the Town of Mount Pleasant

 Goal: Accentuate Care from PCP with Health Coach NP Employee Wellness Center. (2009)[r]

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Improving the 'Arm Usage Coach'

Improving the 'Arm Usage Coach'

Every year, fifteen million people suffer from a stroke worldwide, making it a global problem. [1] One of the more common disabilities that results from stroke is a paresis of half the body. After intense rehabilitation, 50% of stroke survivors can make a functional recovery. However, after a recurrent appointment, it is often concluded that the regained motor function has attenuated. In order to provide on-body feedback to stroke patients, Peter Bartels has developed a system called the "Arm Usage Coach". This system can be used to make stroke patients aware of the fact that they need to keep using their affected limbs. The original system worked fine, but came with some shortcomings.
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Coaches\u27 Impact on Youth Athletes\u27 Intentions to Continue Sport Participation: The Mediational Influence of the Coach-Athlete Relationship

Coaches\u27 Impact on Youth Athletes\u27 Intentions to Continue Sport Participation: The Mediational Influence of the Coach-Athlete Relationship

associated with participation in organized youth sport including positive youth development, increased physical fitness and health benefits, positive social relationships, interpersonal skills, and emotional growth and development (Côté & Fraser-Thomas, 2007; Fraser-Thomas, Côté, Deakin, 2005; Zarrett et al., 2008). Despite the numerous benefits of youth sport participation, around 70 percent of youth athletes drop out of sport by age 13 (National Alliance for Youth Sports, 2016). Attrition can be difficult to measure as it necessitates longitudinal research to track participation rates over time; however, another way to measure attrition is by examining one’s intentions to continue sport participation, as behavioral intentions have been shown to predict attrition in an adolescent sport population (Gardner, Vella, & Magee, 2017).
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Using Stories in Coach Education

Using Stories in Coach Education

While some coaches provided only a list type summary, several went on to generalize from the storyteller’s experience by summarising a lesson or interpretation which they thought would apply to other golfers. For example, one coach responded to the discovery story with the following words: “Enjoys life and living. It’s important to believe that you cannot control the result you can only control the process. This person enjoys life and uses golf to fund it” (male, 40). Here, the italicised sentence summarises a more general psychological point which was, for this coach, inherent in the story. Other individuals summarised a story in such a way that they anticipated future problems and some went on to make recommendations concerning what might be done to help, support, or cater for the storyteller. For example:
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The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Diabetes Mellitus Outcomes: A Systematic Review

The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Diabetes Mellitus Outcomes: A Systematic Review

Orem’s theory assists with closing self-care deficits through the identification of barriers that prevent the patient from complying with the prescribed treatment plan (Shahady, 2013). Incorporating the concepts of Orem’s self-care deficit theory in chronic care management programs will be essential in empowering the patient and providing the necessary resources for self-management of chronic diseases. Patients that take a more active role in their health care through self-management have improved outcomes (Shahady, 2013). Scholars typically use Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory when opportunities to improve patient outcomes are identified. Practitioners and health care providers have a responsibility to empower and educate the patient on how to manage their health and chronic conditions effectively. Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory framework is strikingly similar to the nursing process of assessment, planning,
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Motivational Interviewing as a tool to enhance access to mental health treatment in adolescents with chronic medical conditions and need for psychological support (COACH MI): study protocol for a clusterrandomised controlled trial

Motivational Interviewing as a tool to enhance access to mental health treatment in adolescents with chronic medical conditions and need for psychological support (COACH MI): study protocol for a clusterrandomised controlled trial

The study will be conducted in accordance with the principles of good clinical practice, the Declaration of Helsinki [42] and all current ethical standards. Written informed consent will be obtained from study participants and their legal representatives or guardians prior to enrolment. Consent can be withdrawn at any time during the trial without giving reasons. The study protocols have been approved by the ethics committee of the University of Düsseldorf (COACH-MI study, reference 6244R). The ethics committee, trial registry and trial participants will be informed of any protocol modifications. The COACH consortium will be advised by an external data and safety monitoring board. We will report the progress of the project to the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). No physical risks are anticipated with study participation; however, participants and parents will be provided travel insurance for the second counselling appointment with MI-educated physicians.
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Vol 7, No 1 (2014)

Vol 7, No 1 (2014)

The results from the present study should be an important contribution to the field of sport coaching. However, this study has several limitations and further studies need to be conducted before clear conclusions are made. One limitation is the probability that sample size has influenced the results. Both the factor structure of the ACS and SDT should be verified with larger samples. Another limitation is that the principles from the work of Carl Rogers have not been tested extensively in the educational domain, and in sport coaching especially. More studies are needed before clear conclusions can be made. A third limitation is that the ACS is yet not tested in other cultures than Norwegian. Also, the ACS should be considered as a preliminary scale measuring coaching competence. We consider that the four dimensions constituting the ACS may apply to all coaches but other possible dimensions of coach competencies should also be explored in future research.
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STUDENT-STUDENT ONLINE COACHING AS A RELATIONSHIP OF INQUIRY: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY FROM THE COACH PERSPECTIVE

STUDENT-STUDENT ONLINE COACHING AS A RELATIONSHIP OF INQUIRY: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY FROM THE COACH PERSPECTIVE

Teaching presence in an online community of inquiry involves both peer-to-peer teaching, and instructor teaching. This expansion of the notion of teaching presence beyond the instructor does not apply in this one-to-one relationship of inquiry. However, items scores did demonstrate reliability and the theoretical categories of organization, direct instruction and facilitation are identified as separate categories with significant differences between means. The category organization yielded the lowest mean and the highest standard deviation. This seems reasonable given the short-term engagement between coach and coachee; the organization and preparedness is invisible to the coachee. The mean score of the statement “Students are coached regarding the use of time as it applies to learning” (M = 3.18, SD=0.80) was one of the lowest; coaches are less involved in the larger developmental structures related to time management and meta-learning. The invisible nature of the organization activities coaches prepare as a foundation to the coaching session. Direct instruction and facilitation center around discussion, engagement and feedback, and all are relevant and valuable in this online coaching setting.
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Enneagram - A Journey In Self Discovery

Enneagram - A Journey In Self Discovery

Certified Breakthrough Coach; Certified Coach on Enneagram in Business, Practitioner in Appreciative Inquiry; Certified on Psychometric Testing Tools Training – TVRLS; Certified Trainer for GE on three Training modules, including Situational Leadership and Train the Trainer ; Certified Trainer for Belbin’s Team Roles; Trained for Managerial Grid Program; Lead Trainer on Mentoring; Certified on CPR for the Soul, a program on Resilience; Trained on the Hoefsted model on culture diversity; Assessor Training Certification by SHL; Certified NLP Practitioner …
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Preliminary study of coach verbal behaviour according to game actions

Preliminary study of coach verbal behaviour according to game actions

In terms of content of the messages, results obtained were close to those reported in studies of a similar nature (Bloom et al., 1999; Trudel et al., 1996; Zetou et al., 2011), being instructions the more repeated behaviour in all cases (54.9% in Bloom at al., 1999; and 45.72% in Zetou et al., 2011) followed far behind by the praise and scolds, matched to the categories identified in this study as "positive feedback" and "negative feedback”. Other items related to type of behaviour, as organization, showed similar results to those obtained in other works studying verbal behaviour of coaches in competitive situation (Trudel et al., 1996). It calls attention how frequently the coach did not specify the object of behaviour (201 interventions, which represent 26.6% of total), not being founded similar results in the studies reviewed. This kind of interventions is given, for example when coach performed encouragement and when they were contingent to a good or bad action, but without making reference to it.
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Coach burnout: A scoping review

Coach burnout: A scoping review

41 Stebbings, J., Taylor, I. M., Spray, C. M., & Ntoumanis, N. (2012). Antecedents of perceived coach interpersonal behaviors: the coaching environment and coach psychological well-and ill- being. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 34(4), 481-502.

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