Hermeneutic Phenomenology

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Existentialist-Informed Hermeneutic Phenomenology

Existentialist-Informed Hermeneutic Phenomenology

qualitative research, however, it is not suited to answer questions about relationships between variables or about cause–effect relationships. It is not designed to generate predictive models of behaviour nor does it allow us to generalize findings or to draw conclusions about the experiences of those who did not take part in the research. How- ever, it does aim to generate insights into the nature of human experience which means that it is interested in particular individuals’ subjective experiences only in so far as they shed light on the phenomenon of interest. In other words, existentialist-informed phenomenological research is primarily concerned with experiential phenomena (e.g., the phenomenon of suffering, of loss, of joy, etc.) rather than with the individuals whose accounts help the researcher to illuminate the phenomenon. Whilst its focus on individual subjective experience means that this type of research may appear to fail to provide us with much information about the wider social, cultural and historical contexts within which such experiences are located, it could be argued that in order to fully understand the meanings participants create and to fully appreciate their sig- nificance, the phenomenological researcher would need to locate them within their wider contexts (see also Chapter 8; Langdridge, 2007). This argument chimes with Gadamer’s (1989) view that hermeneutics involves the study of texts in their widest sense (i.e., as tissues of meaning and signification) and that ‘meaning takes place when a particular tradition – that is, the language of a group of people – is interpreted by a speaker’ (Cohen et al., 2000, pp. 5–6). In other words, meaning is not created out of nothing, it is not conjured by individuals from meaninglessness; rather, meaning is made out of cultural resources (including language) whose availability depends upon socio-historical conditions. Thus, as Cohen et al. (2000, p. 6) conclude, ‘the individual and the tradition must both be considered in hermeneutic phenomenology’.
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Open, trusting relationships underpin safety in rural maternity a hermeneutic phenomenology study

Open, trusting relationships underpin safety in rural maternity a hermeneutic phenomenology study

Open, trusting relationships underpin safety in rural maternity a hermeneutic phenomenology study RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Open, trusting relationships underpin safety in rural maternity a hermene[.]

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Language, prejudice, and the aims of hermeneutic phenomenology: terminological reflections on “mania”

Language, prejudice, and the aims of hermeneutic phenomenology: terminological reflections on “mania”

In this paper I examine the ways in which our language and ter- minology predetermine how we approach, investigate and con- ceptualise mental illness. I address this issue from the standpoint of hermeneutic phenomenology, and my primary object of in- vestigation is the phenomenon referred to as “mania”. Drawing on resources from classical phenomenology, I show how phe- nomenologists attempt to overcome their latent presuppositions and prejudices in order to approach “the matters themselves”. In other words, phenomenologists are committed to the idea that in our everyday, natural attitude, we take for granted a num- ber of prejudices and presuppositions that predetermine how we conceive of and understand what we experience. In order to properly approach the phenomena themselves, we need to find ways of neutralising our presuppositions and prejudices in order to develop new (and hopefully more accurate) accounts of the phenomena under investigation. One of the most popular examples of such an attempt at neutralisation is what Edmund Husserl calls the epoché, which is the practice of bracketing out or suspending presuppositions. However, later phenomenolo- gists developed alternative approaches. Martin Heidegger, for instance, engaged in etymological analyses to discover latent meanings in our language and terminology. Hans-Georg Gad- amer also engaged in historical analyses of how our traditions sediment into latent prejudices. After discussing the various ways in which phenomenologists have attempted to neutralise presuppositions and prejudices prior to engaging in their inves-
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Transition into teaching – The lived experience of De La Salle Lipa education graduates: A hermeneutic phenomenology

Transition into teaching – The lived experience of De La Salle Lipa education graduates: A hermeneutic phenomenology

The study was anchored on hermeneutic phenomenology which is a variant of qualitative research. Kafle (2011) in his article “Hermeneutic Phenomenological Research” exploited Smith’s definition of hermeneutic phenomenology as a “research methodology aimed at producing rich textual descriptions of the experiencing of selected phenomena in the life world of individuals that are able to connect with all human beings collectively”. Further, he said that hermeneutic or the art of interpretation necessitates the understanding of the stories told by people about their experiences. Kakkori (2009) discussed how Heidegger showed the link between hermeneutics and phenomenology known as hermeneutical phenomenology and defined as “the research of the meaning of the Being as a fundamental ontology”. Kafle (2011) concluded in his article that hermeneutic phenomenology as a method “within the interpretive design” aims to unleash the understanding of a phenomenon in order to have a better view of the world. As applied in the study, hermeneutic phenomenology was used to unearth the lived experience of the respondents through their written accounts. The world view of the new teachers was expressed in themes in order to have a full grasp of the essential meaning of their lived experience.
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Co-creation of value model for E-service system of Malaysian E-government using hermeneutic phenomenology approach

Co-creation of value model for E-service system of Malaysian E-government using hermeneutic phenomenology approach

2012. Guidelines for UNPAN Partners. Division for Public Administration and Development. An Empirical Assessment of the Influence of Customer Emotions and Contact Employee[r]

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‘The Why and What of Philosophy of Religion: Towards a New Hermeneutic Phenomenology for Pedagogical Practice’

‘The Why and What of Philosophy of Religion: Towards a New Hermeneutic Phenomenology for Pedagogical Practice’

Abstract: This essay seeks to question the typical approach taken by philosophy of religion, and offers a new one in its place. This new approach differs by letting the religious be heard on its own terms, rather than simply judging it on philosophical ones. Employing the thought of Martin Heidegger, it begins with an exploration of the word ‘why’ in philosophy according to Leibniz’s Principle of Sufficient Reason. This is contrasted with the mystical thought of Angelus Silesius, also known as Johannes Scheffler. Again through Heidegger the second part explores the meaning of the word ‘what’ in philosophy, and shows how the nature of philosophy was circumscribed as speculative knowledge. The third part examines what it means to do philosophy of religion, and explains why as it stands this is inadequate. Finally, drawing on my own classroom practice I offer an arguably more fruitful phenomenological hermeneutic approach to philosophy of religion.
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Derrida on the history of phenomenology

Derrida on the history of phenomenology

exclusion of the transcendental to define itself. Transcendental and empirical exist only through a dynamic relation of differance and iterability, as the transcendental is and is not the empirical, their difference translates into sameness. This is because the transcendental and empirical remain separated and distinguished by nothing, as demonstrated in the Husserl papers. Were the transcendental separable from the empirical, no phenomenological reduction would be able to take place, hence the difference between the transcendental is an illusion as the transcendental does not exist outside the dynamic relationship of iterability to the empirical. Were the empirical separable from the transcendental, this would also translate as a paradox as the radical empiricists we discussed throughout this paper have taken the transcendental as a point of contention and exclusion. Heidegger deliberately excludes Christian Theology from his philosophy, just as Levinas and Ricoeur privilege the Other and embodiment over the Self, excluding the Absolute in their phenomenology. Likewise, Merleau-Ponty and Blanchot emphasize corporeality and Other-directed phenomenologies, which I have argued are negative or inverse phenomenologies, and take the transcendental as a point of dissociation from their philosophies. I have demonstrated that this separation of the transcendental and empirical is thus not coherent as these phenomenologists require the transcendental as a site of exclusion to define their philosophies. Hence, defining the empirical in absence of the transcendental does not make sense. As we have demonstrated through readings of transcendental idealism and radical empiricism, both are repetitions of the same through iterability. Heidegger’s radical empiricism does not differ from Husserl’s transcendental idealism, because their ontological structure is essentially the same. Metaphysics and post- Metaphysics are doublings rather than negations of each other, as we see Christian theology and Heidegger’s post-metaphysics share the same ontological and metaphysical structure, because reversed Platonism remains
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Phenomenology from SIDIS and e+e− multiplicities: multiplicities and phenomenology - part I

Phenomenology from SIDIS and e+e− multiplicities: multiplicities and phenomenology - part I

Abstract. This study is part of a project to investigate the transverse momentum dependence in parton dis- tribution and fragmentation functions, analyzing (semi-)inclusive high-energy processes within a proper QCD framework. We calculate the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) multiplicities for e + e − annihilation into two hadrons (considering different combinations of pions and kaons) aiming to investigate the impact of in- trinsic and radiative partonic transverse momentum and their mixing with flavor. Different descriptions of the non-perturbative evolution kernel (see, e.g., Refs. [1–5]) are available on the market and there are 200 sets of flavor configurations for the unpolarized TMD fragmentation functions (FFs) resulting from a Monte Carlo fit of Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) data at Hermes (see Ref. [6]). We build our predictions of e + e − multiplicities relying on this rich phenomenology. The comparison of these calculations with future experimental data (from Belle and BaBar collaborations) will shed light on non-perturbative aspects of hadron structure, opening important insights into the physics of spin, flavor and momentum structure of hadrons.
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ELEMENTS TO A PHENOMENOLOGY OF VIOLENCE

ELEMENTS TO A PHENOMENOLOGY OF VIOLENCE

Centre for Thought of John Paul II (Warsaw)I. - International Academy of Philosophy (Granada).[r]

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Phenomenology in Particle Physics

Phenomenology in Particle Physics

Compared with the 7 GeV/c CERN r- counter experiment, recent experiments, with both counter and bubble chamber techniques, We present a have improved resolution but indicate "no-split" f[r]

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Phenomenology as a resource for patients

Phenomenology as a resource for patients

face of the world, a wonder that is suppressed by the natural attitude (Merleau-Ponty 1964, p.xiii). Merleau-Ponty says that illness “slackens the intentional threads which attach us to the world and thus brings them to our notice” (Ibid.). As soon as we withdraw from our fallen immersion in the everyday world, we can reflect on it philosophically. In illness such withdrawal becomes possible, or is even imposed. This can be an opportunity to philosophically re-examine one’s being in the world. Phenomenology is committed to making explicit aspects of experience that are overlooked by other approaches and may be poorly understood. An adequate approach to the experience of illness requires what Husserl calls the phenomenological reduction: a suspension of a ‘natural attitude’ of implicitly accepting the background sense of belonging to a world and various interpretive dogmas along with it. Bracketing the natural attitude is a withdrawal from the ordinarily implicit
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Derrida’s reconfiguration of phenomenology

Derrida’s reconfiguration of phenomenology

In other words, Kockelmans, as with most other Husserlian scholars, posits the transcendental as the a priori condition of possibility as the empirical. With our subsequent readings of Derrida on Husserl, we will show that the condition of possibility of phenomenology is differance, rather than the transcendental. It is the distinguishing movement of the trace that produces the transcendental and empirical through the movement of iterability, rather than solely the transcendental. Traditionally the transcendental is thought to constitute the empirical, but this paper will show that it is differance which produces both transcendental and empirical, through the distinguishing movement of the trace. Derrida‟s phenomenology posits differance and the trace as the meta-condition that produces transcendental genesis and the retrospective division of transcendental and empirical as such - which Derrida acknowledges as an illusory distinction. This is because differance or the trace distinguishes nothing and separates nothing. The rigid distinction between the transcendental and empirical which many scholars of Husserl such as Kockelmans hold, is thus shown to be an illusory distinction, and a theatricality, which produces the illusion that transcendental and empirical as distinct when they are in fact, the same. The transcendental is nothing outside the empirical and the trace or differance distinguishes nothing and separates nothing as a priori difference.
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MD pathophysiology. Phenomenology of movement disorders and gait disturbances. Phenomenology in MD. Hyperkinetic movements.

MD pathophysiology. Phenomenology of movement disorders and gait disturbances. Phenomenology in MD. Hyperkinetic movements.

Deep brain stimulation for PD Born: 1950 PD: 1981 STN DBS: February, 2006 Preop February, 2006 Postop February, 2006 Postop August, 2009 38 Gait disturbances 39 Importance of gait[r]

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Demystifying a Hermeneutic Approach to IS Research

Demystifying a Hermeneutic Approach to IS Research

interview transcripts.  To some, hermeneutics is more than a data analysis technique or method.  It  can instead be treated as both an underlying philosophy and specific  mode of analysis (Myers  and  Avison 2002). Common  to  all  forms  of  hermeneutics  is  the  concept  of  the  hermeneutic  circle  or  spiral.    This  concept  encapsulates  the  idea  that,  in  an  attempt  to  understand  the  true  meaning  of  something,  one  seeks  a  pre-existing  understanding  of  the  article  under  study  from  oneís  own  experience.    This,  in  turn,  enhances  and  expands  knowledge  and  understanding  of  the  article  and  leads  to  greater  understanding  (Mallery,  Hurwitz  and  Duffy  1987).    To  gain  perspective  on  hermeneutic research, Table 1 provides a brief chronology of its prominent scholars. 
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An Analogical Hermeneutic Approach to Bioethics

An Analogical Hermeneutic Approach to Bioethics

This notion must be subject to constant reinterpretation because the social and biological sciences that bioethics These basic features would be the following: 1 Mortality; 2 Human body;[r]

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Visual Arts as a Tool for Phenomenology

Visual Arts as a Tool for Phenomenology

interviews? Perhaps. Yet I saw across all interviews with each participant that additional comfort, ease, and feeling were provided only after offering the chance to create a drawing. Creating drawing allowed participants to access their voice, speaking about their feeling and articulating their experiences in nuanced and subtle ways not previously mentioned. For others who are considering additional phenomenological tools, it appears that visual arts methods can provide a valuable benefit to encourage participant voice and understanding. In the future, additional studies could explore further aspects of integrating visual arts methods within phenomenology, such as the timing of when to elicit a drawing, using other art forms, having the researcher analyze the artwork, and the potential limits of the method. [59]
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Showtime: the phenomenology of film consciousness

Showtime: the phenomenology of film consciousness

However, it behooves to clarify the notion of the 'real' in terms of realist film and with it the difference between film as fact and film as fiction, since it has a bearing on the 'manu[r]

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Molyneux’s question and the phenomenology of shape

Molyneux’s question and the phenomenology of shape

Reichenbach would insist as follows: it is possible for a measuring rod to give the result that the lines d and e are equal in length, and that they are shorter than any other distances between their ends. (Perhaps we can imagine that a rod, when measuring d, grows slightly longer than when measuring e, and shrinks when placed anywhere else. Then the rod would measure d and e as shorter than any other distances between their ends.) Reichenbach’s empiricist view entails that we will become accustomed to such prima facie incorrect measuring, and so that it will seem to us as though there are two straight lines between two points. Hopkins does not answer to Molyneux’s Question, that the newly sighted man, without further experiences, could come to think that he could have perception as of an additional part congruent with a located between A and B. If a ruler behaves in such a way that it measures such an additional part as congruent with a, he would come to take it as congruent with the part a (as perceived). Reichenbach would also deny that Molyneux’s subject could come to take the parts b and c in Figure 2 (as perceived) to be congruent. For example, further experiences with a measuring rod might make him take the part b (as seen) to be shorter than the part c (as seen). The newly sighted man could not derive any conclusion as to congruence from the phenomenology until he adjusts his eyes to a certain kind of congruence by looking at what would serve as a measuring rod.
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Phenomenology and the perceptual model of emotion

Phenomenology and the perceptual model of emotion

A qualified version of the perceptual model was canvassed in the early 20 th century by the classical phenomenologists, most explicitly by Scheler and Sartre.5 It was qualified in the se[r]

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Low energy hadron phenomenology

Low energy hadron phenomenology

One can push this phenomenology further, by considering radiative transitions [23]. The multipole (low-photon energy) expansion may be an adequate approximation for transitions between hybrids and the ground state or first excited q q ¯ mesons. Photon emission has both quark spin-flip and non-flip components. The former is a relativistic effect O(1/m) and it is suppressed for emissions from heavy quarks. Indeed, the measured radiative decay widths of the leading, M1 quark-spin flip transitions between q q ¯ states, e.g. J/ (1 −− ) → c (0 −+ )) are of the order of a few keV’s, while for the non-flip
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