Hidden Curriculum in Higher Education

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The role of music in higher education: cultural perpetuation in hidden curriculum

The role of music in higher education: cultural perpetuation in hidden curriculum

A study conducted in Australia examining the pedagogical practices and curriculum content of Contemporary Popular Music guitar programs in Australian higher education institutions found approaches toward cultural perpetuation present in hidden curriculum. No implications are being made regarding positive or negative connotations of the finding. By building on existing cultural capital and engaging with historic cultural practices, current pedagogies are continuing to develop historically founded cultural palimpsests. By engaging with globalization, current education practices are also continuing Australian CPM guitar ethno-aesthetic development in a similar fashion to its founders, yet with a 21 st century
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Transformative pedagogy : knowledge construction and effective curriculum delivery in a competitive higher education

Transformative pedagogy : knowledge construction and effective curriculum delivery in a competitive higher education

Theorists of education assert that these practices are equally as influential as any structured curriculum (14, 15). Therefore, adopting transformative pedagogy and its underlying concepts of critical pedagogy and the hidden curriculum in higher education can help educators interpret the relationship between knowledge and power, between themselves and their students. The assumption here is that knowledge in any educational setting always reinforces certain ideologies, values, and assumptions about the real world so as to sustain the interests of some groups and their values at the expense of others. In this respect one must admit that educational settings—whether studios, laboratories, lecture halls, or classrooms—are not neutral sites (16); they are integral to social, cultural, and political relations that can be found in real life. Transformative pedagogy is about understanding how knowledge is produced, what the components of such knowledge are, and what are the learning processes and social practices that can be used to transmit it. Transformative pedagogy is centered on critical inquiry and knowledge acquisition, assimilation, and production in a manner that encourages students and educators to critically examine traditional assumptions and to encounter social and environmental issues (13,17).
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The Relationship between Hidden Curriculum Perception and University Life Quality in Sports Education

The Relationship between Hidden Curriculum Perception and University Life Quality in Sports Education

As in all educational institutions, two programmes, the formal and hidden, are effective in performing educational activities in higher education institutions. That is to say, universities also have a hidden curriculum (25). Although the curriculums of the same faculties and departments in different universities are largely alike, these programmes mostly differ from each other in university life quality created by their hidden curriculums. Hence, in all societies, the place of some universities in the society and the quality of the students they educate is regarded to be different and more significant when compared to others. If it was not so, the students of the same faculties and departments of different universities would graduate with the same qualifications. This can be regarded as the most important indicator of the fact that formal programme is not only effective itself at universities.
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Enabling the classroom and the curriculum: higher education, literary studies and disability

Enabling the classroom and the curriculum: higher education, literary studies and disability

With the problem of normative positivisms and non-normative negativisms in mind I turn to the third part of the tripartite model, which pertains to affirmed deviations from socially accepted standards – that is, non-normative positivisms that depart from ableism and disablism. In Australia, for example, although official professional and public discourses about disability and rehabilitation are predominantly negative, many potentially positive discursive and narrative factors are hidden beneath ableist if not disablist ways of knowing, being, acting, and describing in academic, policy, and practice settings (Sunderland et al., 2009). It is not enough to recognise disability along a continuum of difference that defines human variation; it is important to consider how the ideology of neoliberal inclusiveness profits from the instability of previously fixed identities (Jordan, 2013). Disability is now more apparent in Higher Education than ever, a state of affairs that, in part, has resulted from so-called tolerance, or inclusionism (Mitchell and Snyder, 2015). However, there is a need for non-normative positivisms because the fight for equality is both limited and limiting in its very scope, while empowering and progressive potential is offered by the profound
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Innovation in higher education: Diffusion of democracy in education

Innovation in higher education: Diffusion of democracy in education

cohesion. This framework is an educational policy that must be followed to create a democratic education. Perry (ibid) considers these five concepts a criteria for designing, analyzing, evaluation and comparing different education policies. The first concept is equality; it is considered significant in maintaining that the social mobility is dynamic. It refers to the educational policy in giving all people equal opportunities to study and equal outcome in the educational process in teaching and evaluation. Additionally, on the micro- level the concept of equality is a critical criterion. Regardless of the student' nationality, gender and religion, they must be treated equally by their teachers. This must be manifested in students' relations, the status of the teacher and the status of the students. Equality must also be apparent in the must be given all students equally (Dewey 1938;McAninch 1999;Hansen, 2002; Sorensen, 1996). The second concept is diversity; it isan important concept as many societies confront the immigration issue. This concept refers to variations in opinions, lifestyles and modes of thinking. This can be seen in the students' various interests and academic characteristics. The concept of diversity can also be seen in the educational policy as it provides diverseeducational services. In the educational micro-level, diversity can be seen in the students' diverse cultural backgrounds, different academic needs, and different personal interests. This diversity must be fostered by the teachers in class to consider all opinions and avoid treating different opinions s outsiders and show respect for all views. Diversity provides academic richness and intensifies the academic standards. Teachers must be trained to reach this level of considering diversity in their teaching (Schultz 2007; Perry 2009; Kymlicka, 1995; Strong Boag, 1996; Giroux and McLaren 1986). The third concept is participation.
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Using Software Agents for Improved e-Governance Model Using Data Mining

Using Software Agents for Improved e-Governance Model Using Data Mining

It is important that, the University need to facilitate the students by giving the most current information regarding course selection, educational history and as well as current and future educational and career demands. At present most of the Universities maintain the database of the student performance for many years and have terabytes of data. Using these information systems, the student can select the courses based on the approved curriculum. Few Universities also implemented E-advising systems at certain level. These systems lacks proper decision making. If data mining is used in this decision making process, it helps the student in preparing effective educational plans. This is the appropriate time for the Universities to apply data mining in their data and retrieve useful knowledge and share it with all the stake holders [6].
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Europeanisation and Higher Education: Towards a Core Curriculum in European Studies?

Europeanisation and Higher Education: Towards a Core Curriculum in European Studies?

For many scholars, the arguments in favour of interdisciplinarity in curriculum development are growing stronger. Boyer (1994: 118) has suggested that: ‘In the coming century, there will be an urgent need for scholars who go beyond the isolated facts; who make connections across the disciplines; and who begin to discover a more coherent view of knowledge and a more integrated, more authentic view of life’. The existing organisation of universities, structured around disciplinary boundaries, encourages students to think in ‘boxes’. An alternative approach would be to focus courses around themes or issues that would require academics to bridge disciplines because no single discipline would be able adequately to handle such a course. The study of European Integration provides a good example of such an issue, with its cultural, economic, legal, political and social aspects. Moreover, greater European cooperation on this issue provides an opportunity to transcend the disciplinary boundaries that are deeply embedded at national level, rather than reproduce these restrictive intellectual boundaries on a grander scale.
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Towards a framework for higher education curriculum for small family business

Towards a framework for higher education curriculum for small family business

In today’s environment, the design of University curricula is shaped and formed by stakeholders with competing interests and agendas including students, external and internal academic advisers, QAA, businesses senior university management and governors. If family business interests are to be reflected in curriculum their voice has to be heard in this milieu. At the micro-level of the institution, each university will have its own ways of engaging businesses in curriculum design. One of the most common mechanisms is the use of Industrial Advisory Boards (or similar) where middle and senior management representatives from several relevant organisations influence the design process helping to provide industry and sector insights, a sounding board for new ideas, gather feedback on modules and medium term curriculum developments or inform the design of pedagogy including work placements. If the interests of small family businesses are to influence curriculum design through this mechanism, family businesses themselves need to be willing to engage and participate in such activity. Universities need to invite them and more probably proactively target engagement activity to encourage them to enter into the world of higher education whilst at the same time family businesses will need to open their doors to university interests. Through establishing dialogue, family business issues and recurring themes likely to have a bearing on curriculum design such as socio-emotional wealth, familiness, survivability capital (Wilson et al, 2013), and the social and psychological implications of ownership and transition (Pierce et al, 2005) may start to feature in specialised courses or become part of mainstream curriculum. Many of the distinctive features of family businesses rest on the nature of the relationship within and between the family and the business. Understanding, explaining and accounting for the complexities of this relationship is what would set a family business learning programme apart and mark it out as distinctive from other generalist business courses
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Repositioning Guidance And Counselling And Curriculum Innovation In Higher Education In Nigeria

Repositioning Guidance And Counselling And Curriculum Innovation In Higher Education In Nigeria

One major aspect of Nigeria higher education that has been quite often criticized is the curriculum. Phelps stoke commission and advisory commission who submitted their separate reports in 1925, observed that education generally had not been adapted to the needs and aspirations of the people, particularly Nigerian higher education. The students in Nigerian higher education, on graduation, are after white collar jobs that are cognitive-oriented instead of affective and psychomotor-oriented, that is showing students in higher education care and skill learning which will make them self-independent, self-reliant, and self-actualized. Onyiliofor (2012) is in support of the above assertion and opined … “learning experiences does not merely mean the cognitive, the intellectual components, but also mean affective and psychomotor role.” Curriculum change at institutions of higher education seems to be slow and irrelevant. The researcher is of the view that the slowness of the curriculum needs to be repositioned by stakeholders reviewing curriculum periodically and it will meet not only the needs of both the communities, society and country at large, but also the need of the graduates of higher education to be independent and have their own companies, workshop for engineers, private hospitals for the doctors, orphanages for the social workers and guidance counselors, and so on. National Economic Empowerment and Development Strategy (NEEDS) as cited by Balarabe (2012) asserted that the Federal Government laid bare its concern that the education system in higher education emphasized theoretical knowledge at the expense of technical, vocational, and entrepreneurial education. School curricular need urgent repositioning to make them relevant and practice oriented.
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Promoting Digital Change In Higher Education: Evaluating The Curriculum Digitalisation

Promoting Digital Change In Higher Education: Evaluating The Curriculum Digitalisation

esearch indicates that today’s technologies offer powerful capabilities for creating high-quality learning resources, such as visualization, simulation, games, interactivity, intelligent tutoring, collaboration, assessment and feedback (Expanding Evidence Approaches for Learning in a Digital World U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Technology Report, 2013, p.7) Within the last decade, universities have experienced significant phases changes in making technology a transformative part of education, including efforts organize distance and online education (Parker, Lenhart, Moore, 2011). The effectiveness of a university can be evaluated from several program (for instance, its contribution to industry, developing creative individuals, contributing to political and social life). Major universities and research institutes in many countries are currently evaluating the effectiveness of their investments in technology. However, Keller argues that ‘the larger question is whether the impressive investments in people will be sufficient to propel these countries to a global leadership position in innovations and economic development based on information technology’ (2008 p.101), suggesting that expectations concerning higher education have been rapidly changing in the last two decades.
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THE NEEDS FOR SUSTAINABILITY BASED ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM IN INDONESIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

THE NEEDS FOR SUSTAINABILITY BASED ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM IN INDONESIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

Agency theory explains the relationship between the principal (stockholders) and agent (management). At least there are two main problems in the relationship, managerial compensation and asymmetry information (Jensen and Meckling, 1976). The first problem appears because management desires higher managerial compensation in the form of a bonus while stockholders want a higher dividend. To reduce the risk of opportunistic behavior by managers, companies give them profit sharing plans are generally which based on accounting indicators. This reasoning leads to the hypothesis of compensation that executives in firms with high capital dilution must focus on accounting methods that increase income (Watts & Zimmerman, 1978). Hence, sustainable disclosure could be used as a tool to mitigate the agency problem by monitoring, supervising, and reporting the firm‟s short-term and long-term interests and goals (Ntim, Lindop, & Thomas, 2013).
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DISTANCE EDUCATION IN NIGERIA AND GENDER DIFFERENCE ON THE EXPERIENCE OF HIDDEN CURRICULUM USING MOBILE PHONES

DISTANCE EDUCATION IN NIGERIA AND GENDER DIFFERENCE ON THE EXPERIENCE OF HIDDEN CURRICULUM USING MOBILE PHONES

prevalent among the youths irrespective of their gender differences. Hidden curriculum was variously defined by diverse of authorities. Otewa (2016) and Abbott (2015) define hidden curriculum as unwritten, unprinted, unofficial, and unintended experiences, values and perspectives that the students learn in schools.Alsubaie(2015) referhidden curriculum to unspoken or implicit values, behaviors, procedures, and norms that exist in the educational setting. For Jerald (2006) hidden curriculum is an implicit curriculum that expresses and represents attitudes, knowledge and behaviors that are conveyed or communicated unconsciously by words and actions that are parts of the life of everyone in a society. According to Giroux and Puperl (1983) in Hashemi, Fallahi, Aojinejad&Samavi (2012), the concept of hidden curriculum was variously described with terms such as unstudied, covert, latent, unwritten, unintended, invisible curriculum, nonacademic outcomes of schooling, by products of schooling, residue of schooling and everything taught in school. Anderson (2011) described hidden curriculum as covert knowledge and practice with unstated rules that is useful for successful completion of formal taught curriculum. Hidden curriculum is unintended knowledge, values and beliefs that are learnt in schools and classrooms, however not officially stated in the curriculum (Horn, 2004). For Gordon (1998) it is unintentional learning outcomes and messages. This means that hidden curriculum is unspoken, unwritten and untaught experiences by a teacher, but is learnt in the educational environment unconsciously. The interest cultivated for the use of mobile technologies facilitates spending considerable time unconsciously on their usage. Hidden curriculum experiences are self-tutored learning that are often
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The hidden architecture of higher education: building a big data infrastructure for the ‘smarter university’

The hidden architecture of higher education: building a big data infrastructure for the ‘smarter university’

In combination, Heidi Plus, Tableau Server, Civica Digital and Analytics Lab operationalize the practices of the ‘ control room ’ within HE institutions. Infrastructure studies tend to emphasize the hidden and invisible aspects of infrastructure, as being ‘sunk into, inside of, other structures, social arrangements, and technologies’ (Bowker & Star, 2000: 35). However, the data visualization and dashboard technologies developed to support Data Futures act as highly visible and legible interfaces to the new data infrastructure of UK HE. In addition, they act as bearers of visualized standards and as graphic portals to standard datasets which are able to apply agreed-upon rules and definitions to the analysis of the social realities of the things and people that inhabit universities. Understood in this way, the data dashboards and visualizations developed as part of Data Futures act as control room technologies for monitoring institutional progress toward key performance indicators as defined by the Higher Education and Research Act (HERA). As political indicator systems, the Data Futures dashboards both enable institution to experiment with data and its presentation, while also allowing insti- tutional data to be visually represented for policymakers, publics and regulators, and thereby to shape decision-making and other forms of action and intervention.
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Enterprise Placements: factors which support learning and prolonged attainment in students.

Enterprise Placements: factors which support learning and prolonged attainment in students.

This article investigates the learning and academic attainment of undergraduate education students on enterprise placement projects in a longitudinal mixed methods study. By observing the placement learning and analysing previous and subsequent attainment of a second and third year group it adds to the ontology of purpose for enterprise in education and concurs with the growing body of work identifying placements with sustained academic improvement. The qualitative investigation identifies five key learning factors from the placements which support improved academic attainment. These are: pressure to learn; critical personal learning events; seeing the setting as a learning environment; professional attachments, and having space to learn. These factors support the transfer of learning from one context or situation to another and using concepts of transformative learning (Mezirow 2000; Jones, Matlay, and Harris 2012) or transitional learning (Illeris 2007) contributes to a cycle of increasing self-esteem and motivation and a sustained improvement in academic attainment. It concludes that a praxis curriculum, using self-assessments, continuous short (micro) reflections and taught awareness of the placement as a place to look for and recognise learning, would underpin these five factors and contribute to the academic processes
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Validation of a Screening Model for Referrals to Support Students with Hidden Disabilities in Higher Education

Validation of a Screening Model for Referrals to Support Students with Hidden Disabilities in Higher Education

Assessment of the reliability and internal conformity of the variants of the screening model Questionnaire for students in higher education and the insight into the obtained matrix of intercorrelations of manifest variables found that 15 variables of the assessment considered as a complete instrument have satisfacto- ry reliability and internal agreement and can be used as a recommended screen- ing model. Zygouris and associates (2015) [15] state that a screening instrument can only indicate whether a student needs to be referred to a special needs coor- dinator, does not mean that the student will be diagnosed with a certain difficul- ty. The primary aim of the screening validation is to first consider whether a student needs a psycho-education evaluation, and to identify the student, where the ultimate goal is to improve the effectiveness of the support service [16]. In this research, our intention was to develop and validate a screening model for identifying and referring to a further process for support in higher education in- stitutions, whereby the model aims to identify students requiring further careful analysis or assessment. Quality assessments are costly, difficult to attain, and may be perceived as negative and intrusive by some students [2], so with this model we want to prevent the negative experience of most students, and reduce the costs that the assessment itself requires.
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Quality Teaching & Higher Education System in...

Quality Teaching & Higher Education System in...

Indian Colleges and universities are facing major changes as they navigate the 21scentury and make decisions that will not only impact higher education but will also contribute to our country’s future competitiveness in the global marketplace. This article examines various influences on institutions of higher learning as they move toward a customer-oriented focus. It also stresses the importance of balancing the needs of various customer groups while continuing to serve as purveyors of educated human resources in a global economy. This article identifies and evaluates outcomes from efforts to modify quality standards in higher education. While change is unavoidable and higher learning faces difficult choices, we can choose to make proactive decisions and become agents of change. The financial obligations of running an institution today are a major concern. While not a new concept, there is a trend for public institutions to redefine their identity as service organizations and businesses.1
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Effects of curriculum characteristics on achievement in science and technical higher professional education

Effects of curriculum characteristics on achievement in science and technical higher professional education

To investigate the examination characteristics the curriculum variables “number of conditional exam activities” and the “number of final grades” were used. The “number of final grades” is directly related to the size, measure in study load (EC), of the course in a programme, because each year contains 60 EC. The mean for the “number of conditional exam activities” (NoCEA) is 19.20 (SD 4.89), while the mean for “number of final grades”(NoFG) is 16.63 (SD 2.73) in the 40 curricula of the 1st year curricula. Differences between the domains are observed. For “number of final grades” (NoFG) in the Applied Science domain the mean is 14.95 (SD 2.74), while the mean in the Engineering domain is 18.38 (SD 1.36) and in the ICT domain 18.00 (SD 1.63). The average size of courses in the Applied Science domain was 4 EC, while in the Engineering domain the sizes of the courses were smaller with an average course size of 3.27 EC. The maximum average course size was 5.46 EC for the BML, CH and CT curricula in 2013 and the minimum average course size of 3.0 EC was found for MT and ME (WB) in 2015, EEE (ELT) in 2013/14 and ACS (TI) in 2012. The mean values for “number of conditional exam activities” (NoCEA) also showed domain differences. The mean value for the Applied Science domain is 15.25 (SD 2.61), Engineering domain 22.19 (SD 2.16) and ICT domain 27.00 (SD 3.37). The variables “number of final grades” (NoFG) and “number of conditional exam activities” (NoCEA) reflect differences in administrative approaches in the domains. In the Engineering domain, especially in the largest programme ME (WB) all exam activities are recorded in the central results database BISON and no records are kept elsewhere. In other programmes, the partial results are administrated in the Blackboard learning system, or are kept elsewhere
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The Hidden Curriculum of Sustainable Development: The Case of Curriculum Analysis in France

The Hidden Curriculum of Sustainable Development: The Case of Curriculum Analysis in France

“What is the most valuable knowledge to be taught?” This seems a commonplace question but it is one that clearly raises the issue of the value of the knowledge taught, and which can be considered central to any political analysis of education. In this regard, what counts as legitimate knowledge at school is clearly a social construct (Bernstein 1996; Forquin 2008; Young 1971; Young 1998), that is to say, the product of a selection. This implies the existence of agencies whose purpose is to select, to prioritize and to justify specific contents, i.e. academic knowledge, which differs from other types of knowledge available in society due to its social status and the ways it is constructed. Young (1971), developed the idea of the stratification of academic knowledge and argued that school curricula and the criteria for deciding what knowledge should legitimately be included in them reflect the relations between education and society as a whole. Thus, a curriculum is a set of knowledge and skills selected by interest groups and must, therefore, be interpreted as a stakeholder in an ideological process. In this context, ideology is a set of ideas, beliefs, and values that emerge from an identified interest group. White (1983) pointed out in this regard that there was no “ideologically and politically innocent curriculum”, and that any curriculum definition is inextricably linked to issues of social class, culture, gender and power
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Curriculum development and career decision making in higher education: credit bearing careers education

Curriculum development and career decision making in higher education: credit bearing careers education

The University has a policy that all undergraduate courses deliver Career Management Skills (CMS). We have academic colleagues who are champions of careers education around the university. Many have been around for a long time. If tutors leave, there is a big issue of meeting new ones and training them. Careers advisers will deliver some sessions and help with some assessment. We can co-mark 10% to give tutors an idea of what we are looking for. There are three ways of delivering CMS. Route A is where tutors receive a webCT unit from us for them to teach. With Route B we work on the unit together, enhancing activities they are already doing. Route C enables tutors to show by means of the quality template that all learning outcomes are met within their curriculum – few choose this option.
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The hidden curriculum : an introduction to Ruth Crow's curriculum vitae, 1991

The hidden curriculum : an introduction to Ruth Crow's curriculum vitae, 1991

life, and thus the need for opportunities to exchange ideas. 3) A recognition of the importance J political action in the arena of State Government and Local Government (this is in cont[r]

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