History and Humanities

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From postcard to book cover: illustrating connections between medical history and digital humanities

From postcard to book cover: illustrating connections between medical history and digital humanities

In December 2018, VT Publishing released Viral Networks both in a print version, available in black and white or full color, and in an electronic open- access version [11, 12]. Publishing the volume in the latter format was—and remains—consistent with the missions of the partner organizations to make knowledge at the intersection of medical history and digital humanities widely and easily available to all. The photograph of the Illinois Training School for Nurses, therefore, circulates as the book cover in both digital and print versions, including copies sent to medical history libraries to add to their circulating collections.
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Recursion, Rhythm and Rhizome. Searching for patterns in the history of the humanities

Recursion, Rhythm and Rhizome. Searching for patterns in the history of the humanities

All this being said I still believe the work is a positive contribution to the science studies. A strong case is made for the existence of patterns in the his- tory of the humanities. Bod presents no new discoveries but by putting an enormous amount of patterns and regularities together he casts serious doubts on the existence of a strict demarcation between the sciences and the humani- ties. The history of the humanities certainly deserves more attention than it now receives. A strong asset of the book is the cross disciplinary and compara- tive form in which the attention to the humanities is poured. This focus enables wider questioning and concluding generalisations than usual and has also led to surprising analytical results. It may also help to overcome the great danger of disciplinary historiography which is that is turns out to be no more than an exercise in self-definition. The study of language has proven to be central in the whole of the humanities. Especially in the Early Modern Period philology with its strong empirical pull and elaborate source criticism is seen as the cen- tral discipline relating to and deeply influencing history, poetics, linguistics and many other fields of study. The interrelations of all these disciplines, among themselves but with the natural sciences, the social sciences and the areas of philosophy and theology as well promise to be fruitful directions for future research.
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A humanities of resistance: fragments for a legal history of humanity

A humanities of resistance: fragments for a legal history of humanity

The downgrading of the role of the Humanities in legal education is program- matic, global, and somewhat ironic if not cynical. Lawyers and legal academics are gladiators (rhetors) out to win battles (arguments) with different audiences. They are motivated by a strong prescriptive urge. Other disciplines are useful to lawyers only as aids to victory. This premise determines their cognitive and political function: legal philosophy’s role is to help legitimate the legal system and clarify its main concepts; legal history provides useful data for making normative legal and political arguments (pp 175 – 6 ). Interdisciplinary studies are admitted to the extent required by the prescriptive nature of legal scholarship and a professional, results-oriented pedagogy. Knowledge of economics helps the lawyer’s quest for scientific authority and rhetorical persuasion. As Justice Holmes apparently would have put it, “reading literature or engaging in the humanities [does] not have edificatory effect” (p 186 ). Only the study of rhetoric is useful because it improves the forensic skills of litigators. I have neither the expertise nor the brief to defend American legal education against this portrayal. I would be surprised if American legal theorists would rec- ognize (or approve) the image of law and education presented here as an amoral, gladiatorial, results-driven enterprise that colonizes other disciplines. The authors could claim that this is a realistic depiction and not their own preference. After all, they aver in passing that they carry out research in law and poststructuralism, that they promote law and the humanities, and that they have launched a new field called law and the performing arts. Yet their own claim is that legal academics see them- selves as legislators or judges. Lawyers describe in order to prescribe; our authors are lawmakers because they are legal academics; because they are interdisciplinary (one has a Ph.D. and the other is a poststructuralist and reads Derrida, ‘a literary theorist,’ and Deleuze and Guattari); and because, finally, they teach in prestigious universities.
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Improved Transcription and Indexing of Oral History Interviews for Digital Humanities Research

Improved Transcription and Indexing of Oral History Interviews for Digital Humanities Research

The paper is organized as follows. In section 2. the Fraun- hofer IAIS Audio Mining system is described. Also the workflow of the audio analysis is presented that automati- cally segments and transcribes audiovisual media data. The research on Oral History at the Institute for History and Bi- ography is described in section 3. where the main focus is put on the Oral History database. Furthermore we de- scribe the advances and new opportunities offered by the Audio Mining system for Digital Humanities Research us- ing Oral History. In section 4. we describe the challenges that have to be met in order to achieve reasonable results for the automatic transcription of Oral History interviews. We also present the approaches taken to face these chal- lenges. Training and evaluation of sophisticated acoustic models using these approaches for robust speech recogni- tion are presented in section 5.
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TEACHING DEMOCRACY. Cal Humanities & The California History-Social Science Project

TEACHING DEMOCRACY. Cal Humanities & The California History-Social Science Project

Teaching Democracy is a partnership between the California History-Social Science Project (CHSSP) and Cal Humanities. Teaching Democracy seeks to both deepen student understanding of the history of American democracy and promote an engaged and knowledgeable citizenry. Our partnership hopes to invigorate K-16 educators to formulate new ways to help students make connections between ideas upon which the United States was founded and its governance.

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Faculty of Arts & Humanities Plymouth University. Master of Research (M.Res) History. Programme Specification

Faculty of Arts & Humanities Plymouth University. Master of Research (M.Res) History. Programme Specification

 full access to Plymouth University’s libraries and electronic resources, which for History include Historic Books Online (incorporating Early English Books Online, Eighteenth Century Collections Online and Nineteenth Century books from the British library), Empire Online, Grand Tour,

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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY/ DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY/ DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION.

The Basel Mission (Basler Evangelische Missionsgesellschaft) participated in Cameroon educational development from 1886 to 1966 following an invitation by the German [r]

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Shauna MacKinnon Research and Publication History. Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

Shauna MacKinnon Research and Publication History. Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

“Inner city voices, community-based solutions.” In State of the inner city report 2006.Winnipeg, MB: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Mb.. CCPA-Mb Research Summaries?[r]

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Andrew A. Wiest. Charles W. Moorman Distinguished Chair in the Humanities, History Department, University of Southern Mississippi ( ).

Andrew A. Wiest. Charles W. Moorman Distinguished Chair in the Humanities, History Department, University of Southern Mississippi ( ).

"Vietnam and its Enduring Legacy: Views and Treatment of Combat Shock and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder," with Dr. Leslie Root, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Conference on the History of Medicine and Science, University of Southern Mississippi, February 1999.

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College of Humanities

College of Humanities

The Department of History offers three majors: (i) history (ii) history and archeology and (iii) tourism studies. The history major provides students with a broad background in the historical trends which have shaped the modern world in general and the particular forces which have led to the development of contemporary society, culture and politics in the Islamic world and the United Arab Emirates. Students are expected to learn not only basic historical facts, but also the contemporary methodologies historians use to reconstruct and interpret the past in order to better understand the present and the future.
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College of Humanities

College of Humanities

The Department of Philosophy teaches rigorous skills in thinking, analyzing, reasoning, academic research and writing, and applies these skills to the work of the world’s deepest thinkers. Courses are offered in the history of philosophy, history and philosophy of science, ethics, value theory, political thought, epistemology, metaphysics, Islamic philosophy, philosophy of language, logic, contemporary western philosophy, cognitive science, and modern Arabic thought. The skills gained in philosophy are applicable to every career where high-level analysis, reasoning, logic, writing and creative thinking are required. Majors are currently organized into three streams: (i) general, (ii) citizenship and civil society, and (iii)
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Digital Humanities: Centres and Peripheries

Digital Humanities: Centres and Peripheries

It also sent an important message that the first chapter in this section be a history of humanities computing itself, taking its place along more traditional disciplinary practices. Susan Hockey was commissioned to write this chapter. Hockey’s Electronic Texts in the Humanities had recently been published by Oxford University Press. It was the first monograph in English to capture a subfield of digital humanities comprehensively and historically. It is telling that in her preface Hockey reminds the reader that her monograph is not about the Internet. ‘It is about tools and techniques which ought to be available via the Internet, but at present are not.’(v). The internet present in 2000 for texts encoded in TEI/SGML was via proprietary software called DynaWeb. DynaWeb was, compared to database-driven solutions available today, a heavyweight solution with limited display possibilities. Moreover, only very few higher education institutions owned a copy. My Thomas MacGreevy Archive originated in DynaWeb at the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virgina. And even when it was converted to TEI/XML several years later it still retained traces of the DynaWeb look, as does several of the projects that followed the same migration path.
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Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity

Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity

to the Underworld in The Odyssey. But Aeneas’ visit is quite different from Odysseus’. Aside from the more highly developed picture of an Underworld that Virgil presents, there is another significant differ- ence. Odysseus, on his visit, learns much about himself—about his role in his mother’s death, about his ultimate fate, and about his way home to domestic bliss. Aeneas learns about the doctrine of reincarnation and is told about the future history of Rome. All that is important here is the future of Rome, and the only indication that Aeneas has any important individuality comes when he sees the ghosts of the Greek warriors, who flee before him, and when he sees the ghost of Dido, who rejects his attempts at explanation and also flees from him. Oth- erwise his individuality is entirely subordinated to the cause of Rome. Another interesting aspect of Book VI is the way it encapsulates the whole poem. It unites the human and the superhuman, and it even includes one character, the Sibyl, who entered the Roman Catholic liturgy in the hymn called the “Dies Irae.” Book VI, like the poem as a whole, focuses on Aeneas’ duty and on his fate. It proclaims the future of Rome in glorious terms, and it tempers that glory by culminating in a description of the sadness of human life. This mixture of glory and melancholy typifies The Aeneid. In Book VI, Aeneas’ father An- chises describes the great heroes of Roman history—Romulus, Numa, Caesar, Augustus (a bit of flattery there)—but then Aeneas notices one despondent spirit and Anchises explains that this is the ghost of Marcellus, Augustus’ nephew, who, despite his many natural gifts and the promise he holds for Rome, is destined to die young. As always in The Aeneid, the promise of Roman glory is suffused with an air of sadness, of promises that cannot be fulfilled.
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Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Gabriela Glăvan graduated from the Faculty of Letters, History and Th eology in 2001, at West University of Timisoara, Romania, before studying for an MA in Literature and Mentalities (2001-2003), and becom- ing a teaching assistant (2002-2007) and junior lecturer (2007-present). Gabriela’s PhD in Literature, awarded in 2007, was entitled Particular Aspects of Modernity in the Romanian Literature between the Wars . She is the author of various studies published in literary reviews and cultural magazines, and has participated in international research grants and projects (Academic Fellowship Program, Open Society Foundation, 2004-2005, Curriculum Resource Center Budapest, 2007-2008, Volkswagen Foundation  – Technical University in Warsaw - Th ird Europe Foundation Timisoara, 2005), and has authored studies published in collective volumes. Her areas of academic interest include comparative literature, cultural anthropology, cultural studies and discourse analysis.
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Replicability and replication in the humanities

Replicability and replication in the humanities

In response to this objection, I think it is important to note that there is a wide variety of methods used in the humanities. Among them are: more or less formal logic (in philosophy, theology, and law), literary analysis (in literary studies, philosophy, and theology), historical ana- lysis (in historical studies, philosophy, and theology) and various narrative approaches 36 (in historical studies), constructivism (in art theory, for instance), Socratic questioning (in philosophy), methods involving empathy (in literary studies and art studies), conceptual analysis (in philosophy and theology), the hermeneutical method (in any humanistic discipline that involves careful read- ing of texts, such as law, history, and theology), inter- views (e.g., in anthropology), and phenomenology (in philosophy). This is important to note, because, as I pointed out above, I only want to argue that replication is possible in the humanities to the extent that they are empirical. Replication may not be possible in disciplines that primarily use a deductive method and that do not collect and analyze data, such as logic, mathematics, cer- tain parts of ethics, and metaphysics. This leaves plenty of room for replication in disciplines that are empirical, such as literary studies, linguistics, history, and the study of the arts.
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Swedish Digital Humanities

Swedish Digital Humanities

This last point is the main tenet of book historian Kristina Lundblad’s subsequent chapter. It is an elegantly written, thought-through and provocative critique of digital humanities, firmly based on Lundblad’s profound familiarity with media history. She criticises both the label itself and the claims many of its proponents make. I guess quite a few DH’ers would admit to feeling slightly uneasy with the DH name, while also acknowledging its pragmatic benefits, not least when it comes to attracting funding. Lundblad explores this uneasiness and turns it into sharp criticism, reminding us that the discourse not only risks devaluat- ing other fields of humanities research but could even lead to unjust redistribution of funding for the humanities.
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Digital humanities and tourism history

Digital humanities and tourism history

Tarn Hows is an ideal focus for considering the Lake District’s status as a cultural landscape. The history of the site affirms the continuing relevance of historical ways of looking at and appreciating the region in the present day. The site, moreover, reminds us that many of the Lake District’s most iconic locations are the product of specific aesthetic and functional interventions that have taken place within the last 150 years. The way these sites have been viewed and understood has often changed substantially.

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The Humanities and the Public Soul 1

The Humanities and the Public Soul 1

working women read Jane Addams. The clubs had a strong self- help orientation, striving to make women “more active agents” on behalf of themselves and their specific communities. At the same time, Gere writes, club members defined poetry “as the language of the soul and the inspiration of humankind”, in other words, as universal. “Effective benevolence” linked to identity politics was central to the clubs, but these were understood to be fueled by the engine of efficacious greatness. Regardless of race, religion, or class, almost all women’s literary clubs promoted the practical power of contagious eloquence by reading Shakespeare, Milton, Longfellow, and the Bible. The social place of eloquence—especially in poetry—is being reclaimed as the both–and logic of earlier eras returns in new forms. That logic held that poetry reflected the union of genius and history, that it served both progressive social reform and personal expressive needs, and that it was simultaneously universal, personal, and supportive of group identities. WEB Dubois framed black Americans’ commitment to “developing the traits and talents of the Negro” as a program of “intellectual commerce” conducted by “co-worker[s] in the kingdom of culture”. For Dubois, empowering the “Negro soul” in twentieth century US and international domains while also pursuing “time-glorified methods of delving for Truth”, including those contained in the writings of canonical white writers, was a plausible agenda.
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Faculty of the Humanities

Faculty of the Humanities

The Programme for the Arts cultivates integrated or specialised understanding of the arts. Its variety of certificate, diploma and degree programmes offer informed access to the worlds of arts and culture. Instruction by specialists in the media of Fine Arts, Music, Drama and Theatre Art, as well as teaching in the history and theory of Fine Arts, Drama and Music, stimulate creative discernment, which is an asset in all cultural spheres.

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Entangling the medical humanities

Entangling the medical humanities

Let us, in closing, propose an equivalent manœuvre for the critical medical humani- ties. What difference would it make for us to remain agnostic about what does and does not count as a medical intervention or apparatus? What would happen if we remained open about where (or what, or who) the thinking, feeling subject is within medical mise-en-scènes? What if disease were not a bodily fact that needed fi ner inter- pretation, but a way of describing a relation between a body, a history and an environ- ment? What if, across such interpretive labours, we could think more radically about the role that everyone (practitioners, writers, experimenters and patients of different stripes) might play? What possibilities might open up for the medical humanities, for example, if we discerned a world of awkward, lachrymose, over-involved clinicians, on the one hand, and cold, pragmatic, resolutely scalpellic poets on the other? Indeed, it is precisely in the opening up of such questions that we see the promise of the critical medical humanities.
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