History of horror cinema

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The feminine appeal of British horror cinema

The feminine appeal of British horror cinema

The promotional material for Séance on a Wet Afternoon suggests that the film has ‘feminine appeal’ but in the seventeen pages of pressbook, it never reveals why. Arguably, the attraction of this horror film is that it is about women, for women, where the séances function as a space for women to explore emotion. Similarly, films such as Bunny Lake is Missing, The Innocents and Night of the Eagle explore cruel feelings and bad behaviour enacted by and experienced by women. – including bad, ambivalent, murderous feelings. These emotions are then frequently linked with motherhood, paralleling Lucy Fischer’s analysis on the end of Rosemary’s Baby where she argues ‘in accepting her loathsome progeny, Rosemary acknowledges her own demons – the fears of motherhood that society wants hushed’ (1992, 13). As noted earlier by Snelson, horror film in particular is associated with male address, and much academic scholarship has carved British horror film history through a presumed male audience and male pleasures. This article has sought to not only identify a cycle of horror films with an intended female audience, but also, through Séance on a Wet Afternoon, to illuminate how the textual address functions (particularly what makes the film frightening in a specifically female capacity). Drawing on Doane and feminist theory, I have explored how the origins of the text can be found in woman’s film (particularly maternal melodrama), and, using historical reception analysis, how the address was received by the critics (which complicates generic and gendered categorisation). By doing this kind of work, it hoped that this article could begin a reappraisal of how we write our film histories. And not least, how we include the horror films for the girls.
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Adapting to the dark : reflections of local culture in recent New Zealand horror cinema : a thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Media Studies at Massey Universit

Adapting to the dark : reflections of local culture in recent New Zealand horror cinema : a thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Media Studies at Massey Universit

Lilly, herself is an impeccable beauty in the Hollywood mould, but despite the alluring attractiveness of her appearance possesses much greater depth than any of the other characters. She is the only character about whose emotional past we really know anything, and the lack of history ascribed to other characters serves to accentuate the fact that Lilly herself has a deeply recollected history, represented by the photograph of the daughter whom she lost to influenza and for whom she still grieves. Her antagonism can therefore be seen as a struggle for the preservation of historicity as represented by memory. She has an unusually deep human awareness, fuelled by her sensitivity to mortality, that the brothers are able detect, due to their own uncanny sensitivity. There is a hint of ruefulness in the voice of Silus who as he contemplates Lilly recovering from Edgar’s bite after having saved her with his own blood, murmurs: “I think yours would be a good life to watch, Lilly.” While he enjoys supernatural visual and aural perception, as an immortal he cannot experience the reality of time. The strength of his fascination for Lilly drives a wedge between Silus and the Brotherhood, which has branded him a heretic. It seems that his conceptual construction of the perfect creature is in part constituted by Lilly, a possibility ironically supported by the exhortation of the church’s formal ritual: “Let the blood be one and the two races joined as a perfect creature.” Lilly also fascinates Edgar who has declared, “I shall have her again.” The taste of such painful mortality, of course, has always been irresistible to the screen vampire for whom immortality is a curse.
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Green Horror: The Use of Environmental Themes in Modern American Horror Cinema

Green Horror: The Use of Environmental Themes in Modern American Horror Cinema

The framing of horror used for this study comes from an understanding of modern America cinematic horror to largely be defined by the threat or showing of explicit and extreme violence done to the human body (Hantke, 2007). Although this fear of bodily injury or death is not unique to horror, the modern American horror film has tended to push the boundaries of brutality and graphic gore. Whereas in other genres violence is often discrete or implied, in horror the camera does not pan away when the blood begins to flow, but instead zooms in, compelling the audience to look (Poole, 2011). Each of the films included in the study has an overall tone of ongoing and often unpredictable and extreme threat to humans in the form of bodily violence. This ranges from intimate violence between spouses to mass casualty scenes with a presumed death toll of thousands. As such, there are films included here that are not widely listed as horror films (which in part might be due to the genre’s volatile history in film; Hantke, 2007), however they all have graphic depictions of violence that permeate their storylines. 2
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Screening genius

Screening genius

As demonstrated by the names and film titles listed at the beginning of this article, British artists do not figure greatly in either the canon of art history or the genre of artist bio-pics. J. M. W. Turner is perhaps the most notable exception to the absence of British artists in the litany of great art and with the release in October of Mike Leigh’s new film, Mr Turner, he now also joins the pantheon of artists who are the subjects of major feature films.

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The lion had wings: the invention of British Cinema, 1895 1939

The lion had wings: the invention of British Cinema, 1895 1939

E. A. Dupont was one such director whose career benefitted from the fluid international transactions of the 1920s. His career has often been seen as emblematic of the cultural links between British and Central European cinema in this decade, and his second production made in Britain, Piccadilly, is a key example of this. The film’s melodramatic exposé of London’s night-life, centred on a love-triangle between a Chinese dancer, a night-club proprietor and his girlfriend, was in keeping with much of the portrayal of urban life in British cinema up until that point. The star (although she was not billed as such on its initial release) was the Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong, and Dupont took every opportunity to emphasise her character’s ‘exotic’ Chinese background. This fascinating film suggested that deceit, violence and sex were all aspects of metropolitan life, and more importantly it explicitly linked these notions to foreigners, following in a tradition established by successful literary work such as Thomas Burke’s Limehouse Nights (1916), and the novels of its English screenwriter, Arnold Bennett, which had touched on similar themes previously. As in the 1910s, the foreign woman was the catalyst for these illicit activities, with the audience encouraged to take a voyeuristic pleasure from her story, before being offered the moral reassertion that came with her death at the end.
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Cosmic Topologies of Imitation: From the Horror of Digital Autotoxicus to the Auto Toxicity of the Social

Cosmic Topologies of Imitation: From the Horror of Digital Autotoxicus to the Auto Toxicity of the Social

This earlier work on digital culture discussed the significant role of contagion in virus writing cultures and online communication practices, where, in short, the tendency for codes and communication messages to spread like viruses on a network inspired an extremely profitable anti-virus industry and nascent viral marketing business. On one hand, biological analogies ushered in an anti-virus discursive formation that determined, to some extent, what people can and cannot do on a network by distinguishing between good and bad digital code in a similar way to which organic immune systems are assumed to exempt the threat posed by anomalous nonself cells from those of the self. On the other hand though, prediscursive forces were identified in the social spreading of biologically derived anxieties linked to these appeals to immunity and efforts made to trigger affective contagions associated with viral marketing practices. Indeed, in many ways the concept of horror autotoxicus was initially introduced as a way to explain how immunologic inspired digital systems become vulnerable to viral communication environments in which contagious anomalies are constituent rather than exempt. In this context, autoimmunity is a useful concept because it challenges the immunologic principles of the self/nonself binary relation and helps to identify discursive formations and prediscursive forces that arrange social relations by way of contamination rather than immunity. Indeed, taken forward to an all-pervasive corporate social media era in which a second wave of viral marketing has arguably come of age, this article revisits horror autotoxicus to argue that the virality of digital culture can now be grasped through a prevailing auto-toxicity of the social.
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The History of Italian Cinema: a Guide to Italian Film from its Origins to the Twenty First Century

The History of Italian Cinema: a Guide to Italian Film from its Origins to the Twenty First Century

Brunetta’s knowledge is encyclopaedic, even if he could have been better served by his editor at times, as his tendency towards lists (of directors, films, technicians), is a little overwhelming, and probably unhelpful for the casual reader. For example, page 301 is entirely composed of a list of debut films from the 1990s, and it would have been interesting to have fewer titles and some analysis. Brunetta’s style – his predilection for the colourful and elaborate metaphor - makes for a difficult translation task, but it has to be said that there are many infelicities here: the suggestion that the popular actors Aldo Fabrizi and Anna Magnani ‘break new air’ (p. 89) in a 1943 film is puzzling, as is the assertion that they were ‘ferryboat captains’ (p. 91), and there is a truly staggering passage which runs thus: ‘“Mamma mia, Italian cinema got smaller!” The average Italian moviegoer might say something like this if she or he were to awake after thirty years of hibernation’ (p. 255). Neither has Brunetta’s tendency to mix metaphors been resolved in the translation: Italian cinema ‘has breathed in and digested the surrounding atmosphere’ and ‘fed on contemporary political humours’ but it ‘was traversed by winds and currents that blew and flowed in more than one direction’ (p. 9). There are also many typographical errors, a shame from a publisher such as Princeton. The Berlusconi-owned holding company of which film production and distribution arm Medusa is a part is Fininvest, not Finivest; Fellini’s 8½ is inexplicably rendered as 8 throughout; De Sica’s Ladri di biciclette (‘bicycles’ plural) is given as Ladri di bicicletta (‘bicycle’) etc. It is to be hoped these errors will be corrected in a future edition. Finally, the question of the text’s addressee is interesting: of the voluminous secondary reading referenced the vast majority is in Italian, and therefore difficult to access for the undergraduate student of film or the casual reader, whilst the reader with a strong reading knowledge of Italian and access to Italian libraries will
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History and memory in Italian cinema: a virtual roundtable with Robert Gordon, Giuliana Minghelli and Alan O’Leary

History and memory in Italian cinema: a virtual roundtable with Robert Gordon, Giuliana Minghelli and Alan O’Leary

International events might finally make untenable all talk of Italian ‘anomalies’. At the time of writing, media (and social media) have been busy drawing parallels between the election and activities of Donald Trump and the political rise and demagoguery not only of Silvio Berlusconi but also of Benito Mussolini. These comparisons have not (or not only) been a reflex throwing-up-of-the-hands in exaggerated incredulity, but associations made by historians as authoritative as John Foot and Ruth Ben-Ghiat. The suggestion is that Italian conditions are not anomalous but innovatory: a vade mecum to the future elsewhere – and I intend that assertion as response to the cultural cringe I sense in the question, about both Italian politics and Italian cinema. I take from Robert Gordon’s answer to this question the hint that the particularity of Italy may reside less in its anomalies (which country is not anomalous: which does not have a unique geography, history, cultural and linguistic mix, and political ecology?) than in its commentators’ insistence on treating Italy’s particularities as aberrations from a notional – and normative – model of modernity, seen in Italy’s case to pitch all too soon into vulgar and unready postmodernity. So I agree with Robert that
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Cinematic Vision : Ek Doctor Ki Maut

Cinematic Vision : Ek Doctor Ki Maut

Major names associated with cinema include Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Mrinal Sen, Shyam Benegal, G. Aravindan etc. Satyajit Ray was the most flourishing of the art directors. His films were played to the audiences in the big cities or in the international market. In South India, art cinema was favorably supported in Kerala. Many other states followed the suit and likewise presented art films on myriad themes. The line between mainstream cinema and parallel cinema has been blurring as mainstream filmmakers are continuously working on and experimenting with new ideas and thoughts. Some of the popular films are Sholay, Zanzeer, Don, Devdas etc. Some of the well known art films include Pather Panchali, Salam Bombay, Chandni Bar etc.
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Exploring the Artistic Ossature of Nature and Function of Horror in Toni Morrison's Novels

Exploring the Artistic Ossature of Nature and Function of Horror in Toni Morrison's Novels

Consequential horror is another sort of horror that Morrison applies in her narratives. Unlike universal horror, incidents or events deployed in this horror do not have natural identification in the real world. It is very restricted in its operational field. Whereas the universal horror bases its foundation on what actually exists in the rational world and which is familiar to the audience and the environment around, consequential horror appears different in its artistic action. It originates from Morison’s free imagination of events which do not relate to the rational world. However, even though it resists the laws of nature, it does neither have connection with the fantastic world nor with the supernatural one. The magical nature of supernatural literature indicates a certain link with the rational world; we saw above this link with Beloved’s and Macon Dead’s ghosts which make irruption into the lives and environment of living human beings. This is not possible for consequential horror. Its usage does not require the natural identification of a referent in the real world. Furthermore this horror has been designated ‘consequential’ because, in most cases, its incidents arise from other pre-existing horror incidents, situations or events.
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Cinematic campfires : Australian feature film and reconciliation, 2000 2010

Cinematic campfires : Australian feature film and reconciliation, 2000 2010

Not only have entertainment genres eschewed indigenous stories, Australian national cinema in general, like national cinema worldwide, has avoided entertainment genres. It has been more concerned with a respect for realism (Gibson, “Formative” 52), and with the “dark and despairing” (Enker 225) than it has with experimenting with Hollywood-style light entertainment pieces. Film scholars regularly point to the few exceptions to this pattern in Australian screen history, such as the Mad Max trilogy (1970s- 80s), Crocodile Dundee (1986) and the low-budget bawdy comedies of the 1970s, including films by Tim Burstall and Bruce Beresford (see Dermody and Jacka; McFarlane, “Genres” 79; Murray 40-41, 737-79; Gibson, “Formative” 56; Adams 63, 67). In 2008 the President of the Screen Producers Association of Australia publically described Australian films as depressing and the “cultural equivalent of ethnic cleansing” (qtd. in Bodey, “Culture Wars”). However, an increasing number of transnational films, aimed at both Australian and global popular markets, have been made in recent years (McFarlane, “Genres” 80; McFarlane, “Groupings” 95), which are lighter in tone, and more interested in gaining broader audience appeal. Pam Cook calls this “the rise of the popular art film” (“Transnational” 25). They include a string of westerns (The Proposition [2005], Red Hill [2010], Ned Kelly [2003]) and a resurgence of comedies (e.g., Three Dollars [2005], The Square [2008], Strange Bedfellows [2004], Kenny [2006]). Not light, but a selection of popular horror films such as Wolf Creek [2005], Snowtown [2011] and Van Diemen’s Land [2009]) are credited with bringing this “oft maligned genre out of the cold into the warmth of the mainstream” (Swift, “In Genre” 10). Stone Bros., Bran Nue Dae and Australia are a part of this cultural shift to the embracement of genre filmmaking, but they are also unique by virtue of the indigenous stories that they bring to the realm of the popular.
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Article
                        
                        
                        The Horror of the Anthropocene

Article The Horror of the Anthropocene

It is possible, of course, that fantasy is exactly what these final five pages are – that we have not in fact moved away from the man’s focalisation but remain within it, experiencing with him his dying fantasy that his boy will be saved, that someone will come to his son’s rescue as he himself did not come to the rescue of the little boy they left behind. Such a reading is not impossible and this textual undecidability gives way to two mutually possible interpretations of the end of the novel. Either, the novel shifts genres at this moment because the author is seduced by the con- solations of fantasy, and/or the novel is self-consciously demonstrating the man’s refusal unto the very last to confront the full horror of his situation, to accept ‘that there is nothing to be done, that there is no cure to hand, no more story to tell, no deus ex machina, no statement that It Was All a Dream’ (Clute, 2014: 279). Either McCarthy cannot confront this possibility, and designs an ending – after the after- math – that holds on to precisely this hope, the nuclear family serving as the deus ex machina. And/or McCarthy is aware that humankind is unable, in the final instance, to confront and accept the ‘final gift of Horror’ – ‘to flash-freeze the future’ (Clute, 2014: 280) and tends instead to cling to a nostalgic and fantastical restitution of an imagined past.
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PoeBios

PoeBios

American short-story writer, poet, critic, and editor Edgar Allan Poe's tales of mystery and horror initiated the modern detective story, and the atmosphere in his tales of horror is un[r]

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Media Violence and Education: A Study of Youth Audiences and the Horror Genre

Media Violence and Education: A Study of Youth Audiences and the Horror Genre

Media Violence and Education: A Study of Youth Audiences and the Horror Genre.. by.[r]

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Online Full Text

Online Full Text

Furthermore, user interests may take multiple types. For example, a user may prefer movies of a certain actor. Other user may prefer movies whose genre is both comedy and horror, and this user would not highly rate the movie if it is horror only or comedy only. Third example is when the user prefers movies of a certain period of time, such as movies of seventies or movies of the 21 century. Finally, a user may not have interests but, on the other hand, have negative opinions toward certain movies, such as horror movies. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to extract user interests. This method is capable of detecting the actual user interests in its various types. Such method could be integrated into existing recommender systems to improve it in many aspects. We leave this step to future work. In order to evaluate the system, we use a synthesized dataset, because commonly used datasets in this domain do not give the actual user interests in the form of terms. To evaluate our method, we use both the rank given by our method to the real user interest and execution time. The contributions of this work are as follows.
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Autonomy, de facto and de jure

Autonomy, de facto and de jure

movie the woman we thought was the main character, the heroine, is dead. This changes the landscape of horror forever. We are the monsters and no one is safe. When put into historical context, Hitchcock's reasoning behind making this film seems obvious. The domestic bliss of the 50s was over and Americans were terrified of Communism. The suburban home and domestic life that had once seemed untouchable to Americans were being threatened. It is interesting to note that up until Psycho Anthony Perkins had been known as a leading man in romantic comedies. Thus, Hitchcock introduces to us Norman Bates, a seemingly innocuous boy who loves his mother and so the typical suburban home becomes a nightmarish setting for what is arguably the greatest horror movie ever made. That title became a catch-22 for Hitchcock and for the movie studios as no horror movie, Hitchcock's or otherwise, was able to live up the greatness of Psycho, thereby, opening the door for independent film (Phillips, 2005).
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Notes on Cinema

Notes on Cinema

In spite of earlier beginnings, it is mainly since the early 1960s that Senegalese cinema has started to define itself through the works of directors such as Vieyra , Moma[r]

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Workplaces in the cinema

Workplaces in the cinema

This study aims to explore how work and workspace have been represented in film and how such analysis might inform facilities management research. Most, if not all films contain representations of workplaces to some extent and clearly an exhaustive treatment of the subject would be a vast undertaking. The approach taken has been to select three films for detailed analysis. These have been selected on the basis of two main criteria; firstly that they have aspects of work or the workplace as central themes and secondly because they have been particularly influential as archetypes or seminal influences on a genre of cinema.
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The Impact of Education Decentralization on Education Output: A Cross Country Study

The Impact of Education Decentralization on Education Output: A Cross Country Study

environment. This verbal communication is analogous to the dialogue existing for centuries which allowed groups to share their beliefs and practices. This dialogue has been identified by various names including the oral tradition, tall tales, proverbs, myths, legends, and personal experiences, and was sometimes seen as the way Christians connected to their historical roots. This dialogue sometimes went on to become the myths, the legends, and even the movies of today. But for most of human existence, communication existed solely through speech. When the written word did emerge, it had the potential to change the one-on-one relationship existing between the story teller and the listener. The process of making written thoughts available to others became a turning point in human history. For centuries the stopping and/or controlling of the dissemination of the written word was important to the church in order to maintain authority. In the late 20 th century, this control was lost. Even Pope John Paul II acknowledged
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A star of the airwaves: Peter Lorre master of the macabre and American radio programming

A star of the airwaves: Peter Lorre master of the macabre and American radio programming

http://otr-site.com. These collections have been stored in digital format (usually MP3 files) and can either be purchased via on line download, or by buying recordings saved onto disc. Potentially, many more Americans heard Peter Lorre star in radio broadcasts than paid to see the actor on the cinema screen. Although Lorre cannot be considered a major creative player within the wider history of American broadcasting, he nonetheless remained a frequent and prominent presence within radio programming during the height of the medium’s popularity within American culture. Lorre made repeated guest appearances on many of the most prominent comedy variety radio shows that dominated the monthly ratings between 1937 and 1953 and he also performed in a significant number of radio dramas and popular genre shows.
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