History of Women's Studies

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WGS 210 Summer Online: Introduction to Women s Studies

WGS 210 Summer Online: Introduction to Women s Studies

Teaching Philosophy: It is often easy to assume that in a college course you will be bombarded with facts and figures that you will eventually have to regurgitate for an exam. I, however, believe that teaching requires much more than just the transmission of facts and exam preparation. Instead, I seek to design courses that help you gain insights and meanings that are relevant to your current needs and concerns. In Introduction to Women’s Studies (WGS 210), we will use gender as a category of analysis in order to explore the lives of men and women from diverse races, cultures, and socio-economic backgrounds throughout history. By approaching the course material in this way, we can assess and appreciate the powerful role gender plays in modern society. To assist you in this endeavor, I will provide a learning environment that promotes free expression, open dialogue, and collaboration through various pedagogical methods and techniques. From discussion boards to personal reflections, you will better understand and appreciate the gendered world around you and the influence it has on your life.
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APPLIED WOMEN S STUDIES

APPLIED WOMEN S STUDIES

Linda M. Perkins, Ph.D is University Associate Professor and Director of Applied Women’s Studies at Claremont Graduate University. She holds an interdisciplinary university appointment in the departments of Applied Women’s Studies, Educational Studies, Cultural Studies and History. Dr. Perkins is a historian of Women’s and African American higher education. Her primary areas of research are on the history of race and American women’s higher education, the education of African Americans in elite institutions and the history of talent identification programs for African Americans students.
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Whither History of Women in the Americas?

Whither History of Women in the Americas?

In the early 1970s, the chair of the Department of History in a small Pennsylvania college, eager for the enrollments he felt would come with a trendy new subject, drafted me to teach what I now realize was one of the first college courses in women’s history. As a young adjunct with a BA from a small Catholic women’s college and a master’s degree in European diplomatic history, I was an unlikely pioneer and an even less likely feminist. But, quite simply, the experience changed my life. The class read Abigail McCarthy’s autobiography, Private Faces/Public Places, Julia O’Faolain’s Not in God’s Image: Women in History from the Greeks to the Victorians, and Miriam Scher’s Feminism: the Essential Writings. I managed to stay one-step ahead of students eager to learn more of a history that seemed to be in a daily process of excavation. When the job ended there was no doubt in my mind that I would return to graduate school to learn more about the subject I was teaching and, with few interruptions, have been teaching and writing about ever since. As our director of women’s studies recently said to me in a faux reverential tone, “you are history.” In forty years, the green shoots of women’s history have grown, blossomed, and matured. Any concern for the health of the field can be assuaged by looking at the scholarship in terms of sheer numbers: thousands of monographs, multiple journals devoted to the field, and numerous books reviewed in major academic journals. Each issue of the American Historical Review and the Journal of American History contain pages of book reviews whose titles indicate that while the archeological excavation of women’s history continues, historians continually find new subjects and new approaches—the work of revision is well underway as young Turks mount critical responses to foundational texts in the field. By any index—journals, graduate programs, books, conferences, anthologies, and faculty positions—the field of women’s history has become institutionalized. 1 Or has
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Public History, Invisibility, and Women in the Republic of Ireland

Public History, Invisibility, and Women in the Republic of Ireland

The extent of gender inequality within Irish academia is actively debated. The recent failure of four higher education institutions to achieve Athena Scientific Women’s Academic Network (SWAN) accreditation for gender equality practices highlighted a systemic issue in Irish higher education, and it followed an academic promotions controversy at the National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway in 2014 . 23 The UK-based Athena SWAN Charter addresses work in most academic disciplines in terms of representation, work environment, student progress into academia, and the journey through career milestones. The most recent nationwide surveys under- taken by the Higher Education Authority (HEA) in 2013 and 2016 revealed that the ratio of men to women at full professorial rank across the university sector averaged at 81 percent male to 19 percent female, with a much more encouraging ratio of 50 percent male and female at the entry level. 24 Within academic history depart- ments we can trace a similarly clear pattern of female ‘‘juniority’’ across multiple departments. This, of course, does not neatly connect with questions of women’s history in public per se. After all, not all female historians should be thought to have an interest in women’s history, but their positions as historians in the public eye is nevertheless relevant to our survey. Within the academy women’s history is repre- sented by a revitalized Women’s History Association of Ireland (founded in 1989 ), which is connected to the International Federation for Research in Women’s His- tory. Trinity College Dublin (TCD) has an active Centre for Gender and Women’s History, while University College Dublin (UCD) has a more contemporary-focused Centre for Women’s Studies, attached to the School of Social Justice. Some impor- tant student-led initiatives have emerged from both centers in recent years, with the Irish Feminist Network emerging from TCD in 2010 . Women’s history itself con- tinues to be studied almost entirely by female historians.
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Women s and Gender Studies

Women s and Gender Studies

Through  the  HORIZONS  Scholarship,  WID  encourages  women  to  pursue  careers  related  to  U.S.  national  security  and   defense  and  to  provide  development  opportunities  to  women  already  working  in  national  security  and  defense   fields.  The  scholarship  is  designed  to  provide  financial  assistance  to  further  educational  objectives  of  women  who   are  U.S.  citizens  either  employed  or  planning  careers  in  defense  or  national  security  areas.    Preferred  fields  of  study:   security  studies,  military  history,  government  relations,  engineering,  computer  science,  cyber  security,  physics,   mathematics,  international  relations,  political  science,  and  economics.  Others  will  be  considered  if  the  applicant  can   successfully  demonstrate  relevance  to  a  career  in  the  areas  of  national  security  or  defense.    The  amount  of  the   awards  varies  according  to  applicant  need  and  available  funds.    Deadline:  July  1.  
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Cultural Studies, History and Cosmopolitanism in UK

Cultural Studies, History and Cosmopolitanism in UK

In contrast to the US and elsewhere in Europe, sex and marriage between dif- ferent cultural groups are now commonplace in UK cities. Although the figures are inevitably contested, it is estimated that about 62% of young males of Afro- Caribbean origin under 30 and in a relationship are with white partners or some- one from another ethnic group. The figure for young Afro-Caribbean women is about 50%. There is a similar tendency among other ethno-religious and ‘racial’ groups though the figures are lower. It is now estimated that an astonishing 10% of all children born in Britain as a whole (not just in London) come from a ‘mixed’ family (Platt 2009). The cultural mixing phenomenon operates across the class spectrum and includes the Queen’s cousin who is married to a Nigerian. Di- ana and Dodi are another instance (Nava 2007). These figures are many times higher than in US or elsewhere in Europe.
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From the Valley to the Summit: A Brief History of the Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women s Work

From the Valley to the Summit: A Brief History of the Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women s Work

women in female-intensive majors and the fraction of women in male-intensive majors use 1970 weights. The definition employed for “female-intensive” and “male-intensive” is about 0.5 standard deviations above the mean in 1970. A “female intensive” major = 1 if the fraction female in 1970 > 0.552 and a “male intensive” major = 1 if the fraction male in 1970 > 0.701.) If no data existed for a major in 1970, data from the first available year were used. In most cases these majors were too small to matter. Out of the 53 majors given, 11 were female-intensive, 31 were male-intensive, and 11 were neither. The female-intensive majors are: anthropology, arts & music, non-science education, English & literature, foreign languages, health technologies, linguistics, other life sciences, social services professions, sociology, and vocational studies & home economics.
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Managing Uncertainty: Women and Cancer in Contemporary History

Managing Uncertainty: Women and Cancer in Contemporary History

The persistence of the association of breast cancer genes with ethnic groups in the US, however, points to further directions making the one analysed by Löwy and the Jewish community merely a start. Observation that Hispanic-Latino women in the US have a higher mortality rate compared to white women, led to population studies seeking to elucidate the ethnic profile that helps explain differences in breast cancer outcomes: they found that Latinas have a higher incidence of advanced stages of the disease, tumours of a larger size, developed at a younger age, and with a higher incidence of triple-negative breast cancers (are negative for hormone therapy, and have a poorer prognosis), and a higher incidence of pathogenic BRCA1 mutations.(6) These studies have prompted the analysis of the genotype of breast cancer in Latino woman, currently being investigated by a multi-site study sponsored by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure® – the world’s largest charity devoted to the fight against breast cancer – the National Cancer Institute and five Latin American countries. Other studies, on the contrary, have pointed to the existence of health inequalities as an essential factor behind differences in health outcomes. More specifically, Latino women leaving in the US have higher poverty rates, are less educated, are largely uninsured and in many, their undocumented status prevents them from access to health care at all compared to white women.(7) If, as Löwy has noted for the case of Ashkenazi Jewish women ‘the relative wealth of this population, its elevated level of education, and its high level of health consciousness, made it an excellent target for the marketing of tailored services [BRCA test]’ (p. 192), one may presume that the same will apply to a selected group of Latino women, while in the vast majority it may lead to an increase in health inequalities. In addition, the impact on
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The results of the Women s Health

The results of the Women s Health

of various nonhormonal agents in reducing menopausal hot flash symptoms. Data for these therapies are limited, and most of the studies have been conducted in women with a history of breast cancer. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine have been shown to reduce hot flashes by 19 to 60 percent and were well tolerated by study participants. Soy isoflavones reduced hot flashes by 9 to 40 percent in some trials, but most trials showed no difference com- pared with placebo. Black cohosh and red clover also have had inconsistent results, with some trials showing benefit and some no difference compared with placebo. Soy isoflavones, black cohosh, and red clover were well tolerated in clinical trials. Other agents that have been used to alleviate hot flashes include belladonna/ergotamine tartrate/phenobarbital combination, dong quai, evening primrose oil, gabapentin, ginseng, mirtazapine, trazodone, vitamin E, and wild yam, but few data regarding their effectiveness have been published. Further randomized controlled trials are needed. (Am Fam Physician 2006;73:457-64, 467. Copyright © 2006 Ameri- can Academy of Family Physicians.)
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Haunting History: Women, Catholicism, and the Writing of National History in Sophia Lee's 'The Recess'

Haunting History: Women, Catholicism, and the Writing of National History in Sophia Lee's 'The Recess'

historiography may also be hagiographic, where se cular history demands a transcendence of ‘fact’ and the fluidity of speculation and probability. Lee’s text demonstrates a sophisticated awareness of the goals of historiography, particularly the Enlightenment-driven emphasis on positivistic methods and frameworks. In an age of reason, scepticism, and Protestant common – sense, Lee’s fictional editor submits a manuscript dredged up from the age of ‘Romance’ that demands faith in truths that are beyond history’s purview: those “partialities and prejudices” tha t determine the “ be st and worst actions of princes.” 10 The Recess is both reliant on history and insulated from
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ZENTIVA S HISTORY. Zentiva s transformation over time...

ZENTIVA S HISTORY. Zentiva s transformation over time...

IN 1998, THE MANAGEMENT OF ZENTIVA TOGE THER WITH THE PRIVATE GROUP WARBURG PINCUS FUNDS ACQUIRED A MA JORIT Y SHAREHOLDING IN THE COMPANY. THIS S TAR TED A NE W PHASE IN THE COMPANY ’S DE VELOPMENT BASED ON A BR ANDED GENERICS S TR ATEGY. INVES TMENTS WERE MADE IN S TATE- OF-THE-AR T

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the Women s Impact at duane morris WOMEN S IMPACT NETWORK FOR SUCCESS

the Women s Impact at duane morris WOMEN S IMPACT NETWORK FOR SUCCESS

“We want to inspire, motivate and empower our women to enjoy the same career that I have had – really the privilege of having – at Duane Morris. Our women are terrific, but it’s challenging to raise a family, be a professional, work very hard for your clients and be a leader in your practice area and in your community. The aim of WINS is to give our women attorneys the tools to effectively manage their careers and lives.”

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Island women : an oral history, 1910 1960

Island women : an oral history, 1910 1960

Another work offering insights into the generation of Australian women born in the first half of the twentieth century is Jane Bradhurt's, study of 40 women born in the late 1920s and ea[r]

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S inverse numeric Enrollment History

S inverse numeric Enrollment History

T Transferable/Credit-Degree Applicable - (CB05 = A or B, CB04 = D and CB08 = N). D Not Transferable/Credit-Degree Applicable - (CB05 = C, CB04 = D and CB08 = N). C Not Transferable/Credit-Not Degree Applicable - (CB05 = C, CB04 = C and CB08 = N). S Basic Skills/Not Transferable/Credit - Not Degree Applicable –

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History. Kennedy s Colonial Travel

History. Kennedy s Colonial Travel

Cambridge University Press has long been a pioneer in the reissuing of out-of-print titles from its own backlist, producing digital reprints of books that are still sought after by scholars and students but could not be reprinted economically using traditional technology. The Cambridge Library Collection extends this activity to a wider range of books which are still of importance to researchers and professionals, either for the source material they contain, or as landmarks in the history of their academic discipline.

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Hannah Arendt''s sense of history

Hannah Arendt''s sense of history

human procreation and emotions are set in the private realm. Political action takes place in the public realm. The public realm is like a stage upon which men show and pronounce themselves to their fellows and where deliberation occurs. Action characterizes free men: by action men establish and confirm their freedom and in action men feel their power. Action preserves the framework that makes free action possible: the play defines the stage. Dialogue between men starts from the diversity amongst them and accommodates that diversity. By their actions men create history, as words and deeds are remembered. By acting in concert man creates a world that is more lasting than the products of the working artisan or the labouring peasant. And yet, acting men cannot create the world according to their own design. The results of action are unpredictable. Uncertainty is compensated by the human capacities of promise and forgiveness. The plurality of society and the unknown future are consequences of natality, by which Arendt means the continuous entry of new people into the world, human initiative and ingenuity.
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Present Studies and History of Burning in Greece

Present Studies and History of Burning in Greece

Certainly, livestock people do not realize that burning alone, without the application of a rational and proper plan for the specific area management-use and improvement, [r]

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A brief history of the Association of Adaptation Studies

A brief history of the Association of Adaptation Studies

After founding the Association, I contacted Oxford University Press and asked them if they would be interested in a journal – which would be connected to the Association – and, although fully aware of the excellent Literature/Film Quarterly, we wanted something that would broaden the field of adaptation studies, to include adaptations in a range of media, richly illustrated with articles ranging between 3-10,000 words. Timothy Corrigan, Imelda Whelehan and I were given a contract to edit Adaptation in 2008, a journal that has gone from two to three issues a year and is home to some of the most influential articles in the field. Among the most notable essays are the prize-winning, Clare Parody,
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History of children's services : the history of the Carlton Refuge from the 1850's to 1920

History of children's services : the history of the Carlton Refuge from the 1850's to 1920

Two nice rooms next to the committee room were provided for the matron, then followed a long corridor, with sleeping accommodation for the inmates.. An enclosed ramp connectea tne bui[r]

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Lifestyle and health status in a sample of Swedish women four years after pregnancy: a comparison of women with a history of normal pregnancy and women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus

Lifestyle and health status in a sample of Swedish women four years after pregnancy: a comparison of women with a history of normal pregnancy and women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus

In a Canadian prospective observational cohort study, women with a history of GDM reported lower pre- pregnancy leisure and sport activity than a control group of women without GDM. One year after childbirth, no difference between groups regarding leisure or sports ac- tivity is reported, indicating that women with a history of GDM increase their postpartum PA in the year following birth [24]. A similar pattern was found in our study; the significant pre-pregnancy difference disap- peared during pregnancy and after childbirth, which might indicate increased PA among women with a history of GDM. Despite this observed increase in PA, almost half of the participants with previous GDM in our study did not perform regular PA, a finding that differs from some international studies. An Australian study of women with a history of GDM show that 26.5% have a sedentary lifestyle [25]. Our findings are more similar to those reported in a Danish follow-up study of 121 women with previous GDM, where 36-40% of women do not exercise after childbirth [10]. As previously men- tioned, a Cochrane review shows that the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in high-risk populations may be decreased by interventions that increase PA and improve diet [8]. Despite some improvements in performance of PA noticed in our study, most women with previous GDM do not seem to change their lifestyle according to recommendations.
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