Hospital Disaster Preparedness

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Evaluation and Analysis of Hospital Disaster Preparedness in Jeddah

Evaluation and Analysis of Hospital Disaster Preparedness in Jeddah

hospitals included in this study have tools and indicators in hospital preparedness but they lack both training and management during disaster. Weaknesses were apparent particularly in the following indicators: Emergency and Disaster plan; especially in Hazard map, Information, Committee, Preparedness, The Hospital Emergency Inci- dent Command System, and Stage of activation, Emergency operations center and Surveillance system. Hospit- als also have showed weakness in control of communication and coordination. Hospitals also have showed weakness in control of communication and coordination with its sub indicators (Transportation and Communi- cation, Cooperative arrangement with local emergency plan, Referral procedure and Health facility networking). This research has provided hospital disaster preparedness (HDP) assessment tool that help in improving progress and effectiveness of hospital disaster preparedness improvement. Although the results of this study have pro- vided new insights in recommendations, a continued research effort is still needed for greater hospitals disaster preparedness. The research shed light on HDP as being important in the preparedness in case of disasters. Therefore it is necessary for hospitals to understand that most of HDP is built in the hospital system itself.
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Hospital Disaster Preparedness: A Model for Hospital Disaster Preparedness Based on 2014 Flood in Kelantan

Hospital Disaster Preparedness: A Model for Hospital Disaster Preparedness Based on 2014 Flood in Kelantan

or environmental losses and impacts, which exceeds the ability of the affected community or society to cope using its own resources. The impact of a disaster is different depending on its intensity and coverage area. Major natural disasters like floods, earthquakes, landslides, and droughts affect the infrastructure, agriculture, and environment. Disasters also bring about long-term emotional and mental stress to those involved in the disaster, including victims’ families, the respond and rescue team as well as other civilians (3). To cite this article: Ahmad Zamree N, Said NA, Sibly S. Hospital disaster preparedness: a model for hospital disaster preparedness based on 2014 flood in Kelantan. Education in Medicine Journal. 2018;10(4):69–80. https://doi.org/10.21315/eimj2018.10.4.7
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Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Disaster Preparedness among Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Health Care Workers, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Disaster Preparedness among Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Health Care Workers, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Abstract: Back ground: Disasters are parts of human life; they will never ask for permission to occur in particular area. The world over, they have been caused disastrous complications, disrupting human lives, and exposing the world economy to untold cost. In times of disasters, hospitals are among the most crucial institutions as they are considered as sanctuaries where victims seek ministration. Although major disasters are always to be expected, past disasters and more recent events shows that communities are not yet fully prepared. Objective: The study was intended to assess current awareness, attitude, and practice of the health care workers regarding disaster preparedness and to find out what arrangements were in place should a disaster occur at the hospital. Methodology: The study utilized both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Data collection was made through self-administered questionnaires and semi- structured key informant interview. A total of 290 respondents were participated in the study. Data analysis: Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics with Epi-info and Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Qualitative data were analyzed after organizing into themes and summaries. Result: About half of (50.8%) health care workers had good knowledge about hospital disaster preparedness and its plan. The remaining 49.2%) had low knowledge. Their general attitude towards the issue was largely positive as 64.8% of respondents had favorable attitude. Low practice (8.3%) of disaster preparedness at the hospital was observed. Moreover, the hospital had neither nor disaster preparedness plan nor other forms of arrangements and preparations for occurrence of disasters. Conclusion and recommendations: The present study found that the health care workers at the hospital had fair awareness and largely positive attitude on disaster preparedness. As the national health policy has not given sufficient attention to hospitals disaster preparedness, there were negligible arrangements in place at the hospital. Therefore, much effort is still expected from all stakeholders including Federal Ministry of Health and managements of hospital.
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Disaster Preparedness Among Members of Staff at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi County, Kenya

Disaster Preparedness Among Members of Staff at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi County, Kenya

Disaster preparedness are activities and measures undertaken in advance to ensure effective response to the impact of hazards, including the insurance of timely and effective early warnings, temporary evacuation of people and property from threatened locations. Mitigation is a reduction in how unpleasant or serious an effect is (Hornby, 2010). Hence disaster mitigation is eliminating or reducing the threats of a disaster as much as possible and as appropriate. Health facilities can be affected by natural phenomena such as earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, and floods. They can also be damaged by anthropogenic (that is., man-made) events such as fires, gas leaks or explosions. (WHO, 2000).Disaster Mitigation in Hospitals includes many actions which include, improved design of new health care facilities, retrofitting of old healthcare facilities, national policy and guidelines, hospital Disaster Preparedness Plan, testing the plan, revising and updating the plan and vulnerability analysis. The various measures have different implementation methods and costs. The simplest and most economical have to do with nonstructural and administrative and organizational aspects; the most complex and costly are the structural measures. If an integrated hospital mitigation plan is carried out in stages, the use of resources can be spaced out over time, making it easier to keep the additional expenses within a reasonable margin of ongoing maintenance costs. (UNISDR, 2008)
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Applying Indigenous Knowledge to Natural Disaster Preparedness

Applying Indigenous Knowledge to Natural Disaster Preparedness

Similarly, some local communities have made their own efforts to study the relationship between earthquakes and animal behavior. For examples, some Chinese communities predicted the occurrence of Haicheng earthquake in 1975 by studying rats and snakes’ earlier coming out of hibernation as well as large animals’ (eg, horses, cows, pigs, and dogs) unusual behavior (Bhargava et al., 2009). A few communities in the United States summarized a list of animals’ abnormal behavior prior to the occurrence of earthquakes. Such behavior included dogs’ barking, bees’ swarming, cats’ jumping, rats’ running, birds’ screaming, among others. Nonetheless, this animal behavior has not been generally recognized as a means to improve disaster preparedness in the majority of other less-dangerous communities.
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Inventory Prepositioning and Evacuation Planning for Disaster Preparedness.

Inventory Prepositioning and Evacuation Planning for Disaster Preparedness.

Natural hazards like hurricanes and earthquakes can not be stopped from occurring. However, preparedness measures can reduce the economic and life losses caused by them. The need for disaster preparedness initiatives to reduce the negative impacts of disasters is unquestionable: the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, the Hyogo Framework for Action, the Sendai Frame- work for Disaster Risk Reduction as well as numerous UN General Assembly resolutions stress the importance of preparedness and risk reduction IFRC (2018). Preparing for disasters makes economic sense. OXFAM (2015) and many other organizations like the World Bank and the UN agree that every dollar invested in preparing for natural disasters today can save seven dollars in recovery costs. Hugenbusch and Neumann (2016) studied the effectiveness of disaster risk reductions measures for a wide variety of disaster types. They found that in 87% (102 out of 117) of case studies, the cost-benefit ratio supported the investment in disaster risk reductions. Designing disaster preparedness strategies is a difficult task as decisions are taken in a highly uncertain and resource-constrain environment. This dissertation develops mathematical models and solution methods to design disaster preparedness strategies and help disaster managers take well-informed decisions.
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Emergency Information Management & Disaster Preparedness on the Internet

Emergency Information Management & Disaster Preparedness on the Internet

"At 5.46 am local time on January 17, a massive earthquake hit Kobe in Japan. It was the country's biggest natural disaster for 60 years. Telephone lines across the city were immediately cut, and those that remained were overloaded in minutes. Soon afterwards, international telephone circuits into Japan were filled to capacity with frantic relatives calling the area to check on loved ones.

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Preparedness and disaster response training for veterinary students

Preparedness and disaster response training for veterinary students

environment by creating a disaster preparedness training program within our professional veterinary curriculum that could also be used as a national model to achieve a more inclusive OH paradigm. Veterinary colleges possess a tremendous resource: academically curious, well-rounded and mature students. Creation of a training program that was embedded as a part of the core curriculum with key strategic collaborative partnerships within government and academia will enable all veterinary students (not just a portion) to graduate with the skill sets and knowledge to contribute to disaster preparedness and emergency management thereby improving capacity and promoting OH within our profession. However, curricular/professional change of this magnitude is difficult to achieve. In order to implement a change of this order, it is useful to review the literature for examples of paradigm shifts within professions as well as the scholarly research on organizational change in order to identify the essential components of successful and unsuccessful change efforts. Through the analysis of this new OH paradigm and curricular change in veterinary medicine, I hope to gain practical insight into how to accomplish full implementation and evaluation of a paradigm shift that will be applicable to any
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Disaster Preparedness: Psychosocial Predictors for Hazard Readiness.

Disaster Preparedness: Psychosocial Predictors for Hazard Readiness.

one of the first major laws to allocate funding that would go directly to citizens for basic needs and sought mitigation rather than response and recovery. The DRA was still quite different than modern day disaster management, mainly because there was no central agency designated for dealing with disasters, since this was prior to the creation of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which was later created under the Carter Administration. However, under both the DRA and with the advent of FEMA, states and local governments were seen as the primary planners for hazards- with the federal level acting only with the ability to incentivize (through monetary funding) mitigation efforts. Even considering these major changes to the national structure of emergency management, it was not until 14 years after the creation of FEMA when the Stafford Act of 1988 could be seen as the beginning of “modern-era national disaster management” (Sylves, p. 60). One of the main provisions of the Stafford Act is that individual households are expected to have reasonable preparations in place for disasters, with government response as supplemental. Similarly, local government is expected to respond to disasters with the understanding that state government will supplement responses when local government has been overwhelmed and it needs additional resources, and the same holds true for state relying on federal aid. The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 was created to address some of the limitations to the Stafford Act and other Federal Hazard Mitigation Programs, “by creating the first nationwide stand- alone state and local multihazard mitigation planning process, yet it maintained the financial incentives approach” (p. 17, Schwab, 2010).
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THE RELATIONSHIP OF INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACILITIES TO STUDENTS' PREPAREDNESS IN THE FACE OF DISASTER AND THE ROLE OF NURSES IN PREPAREDNESS

THE RELATIONSHIP OF INFRASTRUCTURE AND FACILITIES TO STUDENTS' PREPAREDNESS IN THE FACE OF DISASTER AND THE ROLE OF NURSES IN PREPAREDNESS

According to Sakurai et al., [8] one of the most important means of improving student preparedness for disaster risk reduction is by EWS. The early warning system is one the disaster risk reduction efforts to prevent fatalities and reduce economic losses. A comprehensive and effective early warning system consists of four elements: (1) Risk awareness: prior knowledge of risk scenarios that the public may face, (2) Monitoring and warning services: rapid capacity monitoring for risk and reliable decision-making process for early warning, (3) Communication: the dissemination of understandable warnings, preparations, and information to those whose at risk, and (4) Responsiveness: knowledge of ability and readiness to act by all chain of information. [26] The nature of early warning is to use an empirical database and existing knowledge base to assess the probability of an emergency. A failure in one part of the chain could damage the overall system. This is due to the fact that the warning system has a strong connection between these four elements. [26-27]
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Development of Instruments to Measure Disaster Preparedness

Development of Instruments to Measure Disaster Preparedness

The next activity after the development of the instrument is to take several steps, namely: 1) conducting a trial of the research instrument; 2) test the validity and reliability of the instrument; 3) conduct analysis; 4) conducting consultations; 5) provide recommendations. Forty-four people, namely, followed the trial: 1) a total of 26 students; 2) lecturers and educational staff totaling 14 people; 3) elements of leadership four people. Selected students are Diploma 3 students who have received disaster management lecture material. The University preparedness level is cumulative from the five levels of preparedness parameters: Knowledge and Attitude, University Policy, resource mobilization, early warning systems, and emergency response planning. By referring to the Ministry of Education and Culture, the formula for determining the University preparedness index is as follows
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Disaster Preparedness: community preparedness & impact: 2013–2014 tropical cyclone season

Disaster Preparedness: community preparedness & impact: 2013–2014 tropical cyclone season

Across the region there are a number of groups on local and state levels involved in prevention, preparedness, and response and recovery strategies relating to natural disasters. Overriding, the aim is to ensure residents of Northern and Far Northern Queensland are well educated and well prepared, that effective and speedy response efforts are made and that security and normalcy is returned as soon and as safely possible. This project, funded by a Far North Queensland Hospital Foundation grant, focused firstly on the preparedness of community members for the 2013/2014 cyclone season. Of the 301 respondents, four (4) were non-North Queensland residents and 94% (n= 278) respondents had previously experienced a cyclone. It was these experiences and tacit knowledge gained from being raised in a cyclone prone region that provided the most valuable form of
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Disaster Preparedness in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

Disaster Preparedness in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

Hospital in Northern California developed a series of templates to assist in emergency operations, including staffing, bedside backpacks, mobile disaster boxes, and premade forms (‍eg, “go-kits”) to document patient care (‍available at: www. calhospitalprepar e. org/ continuity- planning). These hospitals also provide resources for testing equipment, rotating inventory, and training staff in developing response protocols. The St Louis Children’s Hospital has improved communication among physicians and families concerning bed availability and patient transport and has piloted a new computer- based bed management system to accelerate patient placement and service (‍BJC HealthCare, St. Louis Children’s Hospital; available at: www. stlouischildrens. org/ health- care- professionals/ publications/ doctors- digest/ january- 2012/ surge- plan- readies- hospital- perio.) Drills and exercises are important components of maintaining disaster readiness among NICU providers and staff, modifying scenarios and objectives for specific situations. The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Community Emergency Response Team drills and exercises (‍www. fema. gov/ media- library/ assets/ documents/ 27997) are an excellent resource. These full-scale exercises include a sample scenario, the use of volunteers from outside agencies to fill various victim roles, altered site logistics, and postexercise feedback for participants. These exercises could be tailored to include NICU patients.
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Advancing the multi hazard early warning systems for emergency preparedness and disaster risk management

Advancing the multi hazard early warning systems for emergency preparedness and disaster risk management

PowerPoint Presentation Advancing the Multi Hazard Early Warning Systems for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Risk Management 12th APEC Senior Disaster Management Officials Forum Kokopo 25 26th Sep[.]

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Knowledge, Attitude and Performance Associated with Disaster Preparedness in Iranian Nurses: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Knowledge, Attitude and Performance Associated with Disaster Preparedness in Iranian Nurses: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

The present study observed moderate levels of knowledge and performance and high levels of attitude associated with disaster preparedness in Iranian nurses. Nurses' inadequate knowledge of disaster preparedness is associated with the authorities’ failure to hold efficient training programs during their educational courses and working periods in hospitals. This deficiency is recommended to be resolved by paying a special attention to nurses as the largest group of healthcare providers with a key role in alleviating the harmful health consequences of disasters (11). Ibrahim et al reported acceptable attitudes and a lack of knowledge about disaster preparedness and poor performance in the study nurses (12). Educational systems in Iran and many other countries are not adequately developed to address the needs of nurses for disaster preparedness, leaving nurses undernourished in terms of knowledge and skills in disaster management (13). Ghanbari et al found low levels of disaster preparedness in nurses, and recommended implementing training programs to improve their preparedness for disasters (14). Research also suggests low levels of knowledge in other healthcare staff in hospitals, including medical record personnel, potentially due to a lack of planning and failing to implement disaster preparedness policies in hospitals (15).
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Evaluating Conceptual Framework for Landslides Natural Disaster Management using Feature Analysis.docx

Evaluating Conceptual Framework for Landslides Natural Disaster Management using Feature Analysis.docx

Several previous studies that proposed a framework for disaster management in various cases and objectives, have been widely discussed. As research conducted by Nazir et al. in 2006 [5], which proposed the development of a conceptual framework for earthquake disaster management systems using geographic information systems (GIS) in Quetta city, Pakistan, to minimize the effects of earthquakes. Patel et al. in 2008 [6], discussed the framework used to facilitate general practice to assess influenza pandemic planning in five countries i.e. Australia, United Kingdom, United States, New Zealand, and Canada. Kim et al. in 2018 [7], discussed the framework for assessing the resilience of disaster debris management systems. Fan and Mostafavi in 2018 [8], discussed the framework system of system for disaster management systems and the process for analyzing, designing and operating the systems that are heterogeneous, interconnected and distributed. As well as Mohd et al. in 2018 [9], which discusses the framework for distributing humanitarian aid for the management of natural disasters in Malaysia.
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The Current Crisis in Emergency Care and the Impact on Disaster Preparedness

The Current Crisis in Emergency Care and the Impact on Disaster Preparedness

States with a fully functioning trauma system are in a bet- ter position to respond because essential readiness ele- ments are already in place. The day-to-day operations of trauma centers are already structured to meet the strenu- ous demand of trauma victims by virtue of their expanded capabilities. Trauma centers have the personnel and resources necessary to evaluate and treat large numbers of injured patients on a daily basis. These facilities have highly trained and specialized staff that are capable of rapid decision-making, and have the prerequisite relation- ships and liaisons with emergency medical services, com- munity hospitals, public health officials, the military and local government[12]. Transportation assets, memoran- dums of understanding, and educational programs are also essential elements already in place. Thus, during a disaster, trauma centers are better able to scale up their daily operations irrespective of the disaster mechanism [12], and should be the foundation of any disaster medi- cal response [14].
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Preparing for disaster: preparedness in a flood and cyclone prone community

Preparing for disaster: preparedness in a flood and cyclone prone community

Research suggests that the first step in encouraging adaptive behaviours for preparing for an extreme weather event, is for the individual to perceive a threat to which they need to respond (Witte 1992, Sattler, Kaiser & Hillner 2000, Terpstra 2011, Grothmann & Reusswig 2006). Perceived threat can be conceptualised as the combination of the perceived susceptibility to and perceived severity of the threat (Witte 1992, Maloney, Lapinsky & Witte 2011). Research investigating cyclone or hurricane and flood preparedness found that perceived threat significantly predicted preparation (Sattler et al. 2000, Grothmann & Reusswig 2006, Tempstra 2011). As such, part of the challenge for increasing preparedness in individuals is to ensure the nature of the threat is well communicated. Perceptions of threat of future severe weather events can be influenced by the source of the threat communication (Astill & Griggs 2014) with research suggesting that people are more likely to prepare if the information is communicated from a trusted source (Ramirez, Antrobus & Williamson 2013). Further, research indicates that levels of trust and quality of connections that a person has within a community can help preparedness (Ramirez, Antrobus & Williamson 2013, Pennings & Grossman 2008, Terpstra 2011). This suggests that those who seek more information from reliable sources and have good relationships within the community would be better informed about the situation and thus more likely to make the necessary preparations.
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Household preparedness for natural disasters:Impact of disaster experience and implications for future disaster risks in Japan

Household preparedness for natural disasters:Impact of disaster experience and implications for future disaster risks in Japan

With respect to the three risk perception-related proxies, almost half of the respondents were familiar with the length of the response time for external help to arrive in the case of a disaster emergency. In addition, 16.5% and 9.8% of the respondents answered that they had experienced disaster damage and evacuation, respectively. Table III describes the differences in the level of preparedness according to the type of experience: damage, evacuation and none. People with disaster-related experience seemed to be better prepared in terms of emergency supplies compared to those without experience. Furthermore, among those who had experienced damage or evacuation due to a disaster, those who experienced the GEJE seemed to have a comparatively higher level of preparation of emergency supplies compared to the victims of other disasters (see Appendix B). Given this visible difference, we controlled for the additional GEJE impact in the empirical specification using an interaction variable.
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Disaster Preparedness of Hotel Industry Abroad: A Comparative Analysis

Disaster Preparedness of Hotel Industry Abroad: A Comparative Analysis

Jordan and Malaysia have subsequently been struck by a range of disasters and emergencies. Reflecting the hotels vulnerability to hazardous events in the internal and external environment, they have caused dramatic fluctuations in Tourist arrivals and revenue. Events discussed in this research disclose a wave of disasters affecting the hotels over the last few decades, which affects this industry contribution to GDP and reveals the multiplier effect on the economy. The finding also emphasizes that the organization type, age, and size had a great effect on proactive planning and whether if the organization faced a disaster before. Also, emphasizes the power of media in clearing the ambiguity, which helps marketing efforts towards tourists to change their attitudes and visit Malaysia rather than visiting hazardous destinations. Preparedness and an updated emergency plan with managers' awareness will help the hospitality industry to provide the necessary resources, as well as effective training to avoid or minimize risks. Safety surveillance and security systems are very important to save guests' lives and hospitality properties. These factors can also be used as a marketing tool for guests and meeting planners. Proactive emergency planning and the urgent need for better cooperation, coordination and awareness efforts among the industry stakeholders, government agencies, and local communities could mitigate the negative impact of hazardous events, allowing organizations to learn from the past to prevent the same effects in the future. Finally, it's very important to understand the emergency frameworks to mitigate effects and be well prepared before the crisis strike, and furthermore, to minimize losses during evacuation when the disaster happens. Effective proactive planning was exists in the governmental level, increase awareness, enhance services, secure sufficient fund, emergency planning knowledge will help the industry to be well prepared for future disasters. Learning from the past to overcome the effect of such events. But unfortunately, this study found a dereliction to proactive emergency planning by the industry key players.
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