Humanities and Philosophy

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The re-appreciation of the humanities in contemporary philosophy of science: From recognition to exaggeration?

The re-appreciation of the humanities in contemporary philosophy of science: From recognition to exaggeration?

After quoting this passage, Rorty (1991:95) reveals: ‘Much of what I have been saying is an attempt to follow up on this passage from Dewey’. In agreement with Dewey, the humanities should not be considered ‘inferior’ to the natural sciences. In agreement with Lyotard, Rorty states: ‘The point that there are no interesting epistemological differences between the aims and procedures of scientists and those of politicians is absolutely fundamental’ (Rorty ibid:92). In conclusion, we have reached the point where the differences between natural sciences and humanities can vanish without problems. Here we can conclude our historical survey and say that (although the process was not always linear and ‘smooth’), contemporary philosophy of science gradually re-established the role and status of the humanities. Several strategies were used: initially Rickert and Weber pointed out that the humanities are different from the natural sciences and therefore should not be asked to endorse the same method or to treat their objects of study in the same way. Later on, however, the strategy changed. As soon as the humanities reached sufficient ‘prestige’ the idea that they are similar to natural science returned, but this time it was in order to argue that the natural sciences have nothing different from the humanities!
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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY/ DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY/ DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION.

The Basel Mission (Basler Evangelische Missionsgesellschaft) participated in Cameroon educational development from 1886 to 1966 following an invitation by the German [r]

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Overcoming the Empty Years: the Role of Philosophy and the Humanities in West Germany after 1945

Overcoming the Empty Years: the Role of Philosophy and the Humanities in West Germany after 1945

passionate critique of ‘objective values.’ Henrich points out, “Zwar wirkte aus Frankreich der Existentialismus herüber, der aber erkennbar modisch getönt war. Wer sich also auf ihn nicht verlassen mochte und auch Altbewährtes nicht nur fortsetzen wollte, mußte einen indirekteren Zugang zum selbständigen Denken suchen.” 226 As we will see in the following chapters, there were many such “indirect avenues to independent thought” for the philosophical youth. However, the most successful among them found their way by means of a questioning of the German tradition and, later, a reconnection with intellectual movements that had been suppressed or forced from Germany and Europe by the Nazi Regime. Critical engagement, not with contemporary politics in the first instance, but with the problems of the German and Western philosophical tradition was the first, difficult path that they had to traverse to gain entry to the profession. This might have appeared to many in the public realm as yet another example of the postwar intellectual youth’s political apathy; or it could have been an abdication of responsibility on the part of their instructors to engender a discussion of contemporary political events. Yet recourse to tradition also can take the form of assessing the strengths and weaknesses of one’s own cultural inheritance. In this way, the most gifted young thinkers coped with the trauma of the recent political and moral collapse by focusing their critical questioning first on the long-term intellectual antecedents of their current predicament. Philosophical instruction and research into the history of philosophy became the safe enclave for
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Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

The successful candidates were from a diverse range of disciplinary backgrounds, including archaeology, comparative literature, cultural stud- ies, digital humanities, film, history, information studies, literature, linguistics, Oriental studies, philology and philosophy. Eleven countries were formally represented, with many others represented in the international educational and research expe- rience of the participants (see appendix for list of participants.) Four senior colleagues provided introductions to the four thematic discussions: Dr Karen Skovgaard-Petersen (Danish Royal Library, Copenhagen) on the theme of engagement; Professor Poul Holm (Trinity College) on the theme of impact; Professor Péter Dávidházi (Hungarian Academy of Sciences) on the theme of language diversity; and Professor Gudrun Gersmann (German Historical Institute, Paris) on the theme of future develop- ments.
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The Humanities and the Public Soul 1

The Humanities and the Public Soul 1

Humanists and artists are always called upon to explain what the humanities are. What is art? Less interesting than the myriad definitions we summon up in response to these queries are the broader associations that cluster around such terms. To many, these disciplines broadly signify expression and inspiration—in sum, they are about being moved. They are also identified with analysis, theory, and critique. Artists and humanists in and out of the academy fret about how to negotiate the tension between hope and opposition, desire and critique, feeling and the labor of analyzing feeling. In public scholarship, these stresses become more pronounced. But at the same time, public scholarship can bring these tendencies into new and more fruitful balance. The defining feature of engaged cultural work is a determination to do it all, to undertake complicated projects that join diverse partners, combine the arts and humanities, link teaching with research, bring several generations together, yield new products and relationships, take seriously the past and the future. The driving philosophy is one of both– and, both mind and soul, both local and universal.
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Putting the humanities to work

Putting the humanities to work

employers who did contribute to the Humanities DDP were highly engaged and expressed strong views on both philosophy and content. Employer representative organisations were able to communicate the findings of past research and consultations. However, there is currently a cultural gap between an education characterised in terms of humanities and social sciences subjects and the concerns that employers express about skills, workforce capability and recruitment. Indeed it was part of the mission of the Humanities DDP to address this cultural gap and to explore how the
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Decline of Humanities

Decline of Humanities

degree programs in German, philosophy, and world languages and culture. At elite universities, such departments are safe but wary. Evidences such as these suggest that humanities are indeed in crisis. Though some data crunchers and experts assert that the ‘crisis’ is overstated and allege that opponents of spending on humanities studies “use that fictitious decline to further delegitimize humanities research”. Broadly, there may be some lack of consensus on the extent of decline in enrollment and funding in humanities but there is certainly little doubt about the fading of interest in humanities among both students/parents and State; and sadly the trend is echoed globally.
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Replicability and replication in the humanities

Replicability and replication in the humanities

In response to this objection, I think it is important to note that there is a wide variety of methods used in the humanities. Among them are: more or less formal logic (in philosophy, theology, and law), literary analysis (in literary studies, philosophy, and theology), historical ana- lysis (in historical studies, philosophy, and theology) and various narrative approaches 36 (in historical studies), constructivism (in art theory, for instance), Socratic questioning (in philosophy), methods involving empathy (in literary studies and art studies), conceptual analysis (in philosophy and theology), the hermeneutical method (in any humanistic discipline that involves careful read- ing of texts, such as law, history, and theology), inter- views (e.g., in anthropology), and phenomenology (in philosophy). This is important to note, because, as I pointed out above, I only want to argue that replication is possible in the humanities to the extent that they are empirical. Replication may not be possible in disciplines that primarily use a deductive method and that do not collect and analyze data, such as logic, mathematics, cer- tain parts of ethics, and metaphysics. This leaves plenty of room for replication in disciplines that are empirical, such as literary studies, linguistics, history, and the study of the arts.
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Digital humanities and tourism history

Digital humanities and tourism history

This short paper reports on research undertaken by the Geospatial Innovation in the Digital Humanities project at Lancaster University. The case study discussed pertains to the National Trust’s conservation strategies at one of its key properties in the Lake District National Park: Tarn Hows (OS Grid Ref: SD 33068 99977). In addition to explaining the methods and findings of this research, our report considers the relation of the National Trust’s management practices at these properties to historical and contemporary perceptions of the role of human industry and agency in shaping the Lake District.
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The Humanities as Heuristic: Coordinating the Sector

The Humanities as Heuristic: Coordinating the Sector

That is precisely what I was told that when I chaired the working party charged with designing a humanities capability for the National Collaborative Research Strategy (NCRIS) in 2008; it was offered as an explanation of the fact that not a single dollar of the $550 million allocated to the setting up of a national research infrastructure had been spent on research infrastructure for the humanities so far. The Academy’s current president, Joy Damousi, was given a similar explanation for a 2018 decision in the same area—the latest national roadmap for research infrastructure: $43 million, out of the $50 million set aside for humanities and social science projects, was allocated to CSIRO to set up a collecting facility for plant conservation. This strategy is not devised solely for us, of course. Those of you who have followed the treatment of Indigenous Australians within the policy space will have encountered precisely the same tactic. Assuming all Aboriginal groups have the same political interests is a handy means of setting their claims aside when their positions appear to be in conflict.
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Dynamic Maps in Humanities Computing

Dynamic Maps in Humanities Computing

For many projects using historical data, there will not be a single map that can be used as a base map, since each published map will only represent a ‘snapshot’ of a particular time viewed from a particular political or racial bias. Physical features such as roads and railways are regarded as fixed objects by the majority of those producing present-day maps. However, from a historian’s viewpoint these features are not fixed but are in a continual state of change and development. For example, the fixed reference points of the transport network of contemporary cartography cannot provide such a stable framework for a historian. In the case of a transport network the development of the framework may itself be the cause or product of changes the historian is seeking to invest- igate. One of the potential attractions of GIS in the humanities is that, although it is weak in this area at the moment, it could be developed to manage and represent these changes via metadata detailing temporal information associated with each feature. This would have far-reaching applications in many disciplines.
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Digital Humanities: Centres and Peripheries

Digital Humanities: Centres and Peripheries

So what exactly is that new insurgency? What rough beast has slouched into the neighborhood threatening to upset everyone’s applecart? The program’s statistics deliver a clear answer. Upward of 40 sessions are devoted to what is called the “digital humanities,” an umbrella term for new and fast-moving developments across a range of topics: the organization and administration of libraries, the rethinking of peer review, the study of social networks, the expansion of digital archives, the refining of search engines, the production of scholarly editions, the restructuring of undergraduate instruction, the transformation of scholarly publishing, the re-conception of the doctoral dissertation, the teaching of foreign languages, the proliferation of online journals, the redefinition of what it means to be a text, the changing face of tenure — in short, everything.
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Opening the Open Library of Humanities

Opening the Open Library of Humanities

It was within this context that the Open Library of Humanities was born. It has taken two and a half years of planning; a great deal of consultation with academics, libraries and funders; the willing support of almost 100 libraries; many talks and publications; and a great deal of hard work. What we have so far is the seed of a scal- able model for journal transition to open access in the humanities that does not rely on payment from authors or readers.

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UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA Philosophy Department, College of Arts & Humanities

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA Philosophy Department, College of Arts & Humanities

Students are expected to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity, neither engaging in nor tolerating academic dishonesty.. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited t[r]

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Research Infrastructures in the Digital Humanities

Research Infrastructures in the Digital Humanities

The ‘onion rings’ represent different degrees of disciplinary input, and abstraction from general technologies, into the specific research infrastructure for areas of the Digital Humanities. At the core – level (a) – lies the underpinning technologies, which are generic ICTs to store, manipulate, communicate and maintain any collection of data. At the next level (b) the Digital Humanities assets are constructed so as to support different lines of Humanities enquiries. This requires co-development between Humanities and computing professionals, with each offering specialist skills and together designing the required infrastructure. The digital representations chosen will influence not only the forms of interrogation that can be made of the elements, but also the mechanisms required to provide long-term preservation and accessibility. Thus, digitised images of individual pages of text will have different potential uses from text files of the content. Capturing both may offer the opportunity for additional enquiry, but also requires the long-term preservation of both and maintenance of the link between the image and the text. Level (c) involves the tools that are used to conduct domain specific research. These tools need to access embedded knowledge in the data and the metadata, which is represented by the domain’s ontologies, taxonomies and specialist thesauri to enable the semantic linkages and relationships to be used in formulating queries and answering them. Such tools should also allow humanists to experiment and browse the data in order to evolve novel research methods and interesting lines of enquiry. Many of these can be expected to involve detection and resolution of co-referencing with multiple data sources (i.e., recognising that the same entity is being referred to in multiple sources). These tools require co-development by bringing together humanists in different domain specialisations with computer scientists and information professionals. Level (d) contains tools that are evolved around specific projects, and are therefore more specific. If level (c) involves generic humanities research tools then level (d) may tune them for specific datasets, for example, by using the thesauri that relate to that dataset in content-based searches using natural language tools.
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School of Humanities and Social Science

School of Humanities and Social Science

Claflin University’s students complete the following General Education Requirements through courses offered in the Department of English and Foreign Languages: ENGL [r]

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World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

The objectives of the literature review include finding out the time-cost optimization techniques used by Kenya Roads Board for the delivery of the government construction projects, exa[r]

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World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

Unlike most of developed countries higher education, in many Ethiopian public higher educations there are strong occurrence of various unethical practices such as corruption, poor go[r]

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World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

World Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities

Apart from economic reasons in Ethiopia, which are of primary importance, women and in particular young single women, tend to migrate in order to escape the hardship of rural life and[r]

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Big Humanities Data: About the role of Automatic Natural Language Processing Techniques in the Digital Humanities

Big Humanities Data: About the role of Automatic Natural Language Processing Techniques in the Digital Humanities

• Question : Why is Text Reuse so relevant for Humanities and Computer Science. • Premise : The amount of digitally available data is growing exponentially (Big Data)[r]

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