Humanities Computing (Digital Humanities)

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Dynamic Maps in Humanities Computing

Dynamic Maps in Humanities Computing

It is significant that we use the phrase ‘I see’ when what we mean is ‘I understand’. This is the primary principle behind visualisation tech- niques – we often need to ‘see’ the data graphically before we can under- stand it. The development of methods and techniques for exploring and displaying spatial data in the humanities disciplines, as dynamic maps or otherwise, offers many opportunities for original and creative thought and discovery of new knowledge. The case studies described in this paper have shown some of the strengths of dynamic mapping and highlighted some of the challenges and opportunities facing workers in this field. The limiting factors, such as lack of historical digital map data, are gradually being overcome as digital resources are produced which benefit subse- quent, sometimes unrelated, projects. Even where a project does not produce a digital resource that can be utilised by others, it may still produce methodologies or concepts that advance the development of dy- namic mapping in the emerging discipline of humanities computing.
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Another Suitcase, Another Student Hall — Where Are We Going To? What ACH/ALLC 2001 Can Tell Us About the Current Direction of Humanities Computing

Another Suitcase, Another Student Hall — Where Are We Going To? What ACH/ALLC 2001 Can Tell Us About the Current Direction of Humanities Computing

Lightbox: The Potential of Peer-to-Peer Humanities Computing” demonstrated the development of an image based software tool which functions as an image based whiteboard for the web, allowing images to be juxtaposed for comparison, discussing the prospects the development of this kind of tool has for humanities computing. Brown and Seales, in “3D Imaging and Processing of Damaged Texts” showed how 3D imaging can be used as a means of creating, manipulating, restoring and carefully measuring features on digital facsimiles of manuscripts, applying new restoration techniques such as flattening to aid historians in their studying of manuscripts and other texts. Terras, in “Reading the Papyrologist: Building Systems to Aid the Humanities Expert” discussed the process involved in working with humanities experts in order to identify what type of computer tools will help them carry out their task, and the construction of a system to aid papyrologists in reading ancient texts. The analysis of music scores was presented by Ng’s poster, “Optical Music Recognition: Stroke Tracing and Reconstruction of Hand-written Manuscripts”, which documented an automatic and efficient method to transform paper-based music scores into a machine representation. Bod’s, “Using Natural Language Processing Techniques for Musical Parsing” presented an investigation into whether it is possible to use probabilistic parsing techniques from Natural Language Processing to parse Music into groups and phrases which can be represented in a tree structure. The paper presented the development of a new parser which combines techniques from probabilistic heuristics to solve ambiguity in order for it to parse music accurately. Ng, in “Music via Motion: Interactive Multimedia Performances” demonstrated a motion and colour detection system which uses a video camera to survey a live scene and track visual changes.
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Swedish Digital Humanities

Swedish Digital Humanities

For almost 20 years Humlab at Umeå University has indefatigably presented and critically developed the DH field in Sweden (and beyond) through conferences, workshops and courses, doctoral and postdoc posi- tions, cooperative support to the many faculties and departments at the university, and of course through its physical lab presence on campus. Humlab takes a broad view on digital humanities: although the field traces its roots back to humanities computing based on textual scholarship and linguistics, Humlab was already from the start eager to combine these interests with areas such as visualisation, virtual representations of culture and history, and studies of how digital media open up for new forms of narrative and artistic expression.
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Digital Humanities: Centres and Peripheries

Digital Humanities: Centres and Peripheries

It also sent an important message that the first chapter in this section be a history of humanities computing itself, taking its place along more traditional disciplinary practices. Susan Hockey was commissioned to write this chapter. Hockey’s Electronic Texts in the Humanities had recently been published by Oxford University Press. It was the first monograph in English to capture a subfield of digital humanities comprehensively and historically. It is telling that in her preface Hockey reminds the reader that her monograph is not about the Internet. ‘It is about tools and techniques which ought to be available via the Internet, but at present are not.’(v). The internet present in 2000 for texts encoded in TEI/SGML was via proprietary software called DynaWeb. DynaWeb was, compared to database-driven solutions available today, a heavyweight solution with limited display possibilities. Moreover, only very few higher education institutions owned a copy. My Thomas MacGreevy Archive originated in DynaWeb at the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virgina. And even when it was converted to TEI/XML several years later it still retained traces of the DynaWeb look, as does several of the projects that followed the same migration path.
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Metis meets empirical modelling : from ancient wisdom to emerging technology

Metis meets empirical modelling : from ancient wisdom to emerging technology

Cooperative creation: Previous EM research strongly suggests that modelling with construals has highly significant advantages over any variety of computer programming where activities that involve an intimate integration of manual and automated activity are concerned. Whereas the interpretative framework that surrounds a conventional program is fixed on conception, the whole purpose of the construal is to reflect relationships that are fluid and negotiable. In contrast to programming, where there is a sharp distinction between development and use, it is a matter of interpretation whether a redefinition is associated with 'shooting the film' or 'building the camera' (cf. [2,29]). Research on themes relating to concurrent engineering [3,4,5], decision-support [6], educational technology [7,8], humanities computing [29] and on an underlying philosophical framework for EM [2] all points to the conclusion that modelling with construals supplies an essential bridge between pre-articulate human experience and interaction based on language. In particular, in a environment for cooperation, direct interaction with another's construals (cf. [12]) is a form of pre-linguistic communication that arguably has a fundamental role to play in boot- strapping the more radical high-level forms of linguistic interaction envisaged in the Métis project.
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Table of contents. KEYNOTE Keynote Address / Intervento invitato Toward a Computational Narratology 17 Jan Christoph Meister

Table of contents. KEYNOTE Keynote Address / Intervento invitato Toward a Computational Narratology 17 Jan Christoph Meister

and Shared Infrastructures for Humanities Computing” so we particularly welcomed submissions on interdisciplinary work and new developments in the field, encouraging proposals relating to the theme of the conference, or more specifically: interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity, legal and eco- nomic issues, tools and collaborative methodologies, measurement and im- pact of collaborative methodologies, sharing and collaboration methods and approaches, cultural institutions and collaborative facilities, infrastructures and digital libraries as collaborative environments, data resources and tech- nologies sharing.
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Making the Implicit Explicit: the Grammar of Inferential Reasoning in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Making the Implicit Explicit: the Grammar of Inferential Reasoning in the Humanities and Social Sciences

The application of Brandom’s ideas to pedagogic practice reported on here was not set up as a formal research project, but rather as an action research project embedded in ED work with disadvantaged students in a Humanities Faculty. The intervention involved ED academics and a team of Teaching Assistants (TAs) and Tutors who design and run supplementary tutorials in first and second year courses in eight departments. A set of ‘Brandom-type Questions’, based on Brandom’s theory of making inferential reasoning explicit, were developed, circulated and discussed at a training workshop on designing materials for assisting students to unpack prescribed readings (see Appendix A). TAs re-worked the questions for specific disciplinary texts for students to work on in their tutorials (see examples in Appendices B & C). At a follow-up workshop and in some of the formal evaluation comments, TAs and tutors reported that these exercises did successfully force students to undertake a close reading of the texts. However, they also reported that when marks were allocated, the Brandom-type Questions produced a much wider distribution of marks than previously – including higher failure rates. Additionally, evaluation feedback suggested that some of the tutors were unable to provide sufficiently diagnostic feedback to enable students to improve 12 . This suggests that while the
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Edgar L. Dyer, Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer For David A. DeCenzo, President

Edgar L. Dyer, Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer For David A. DeCenzo, President

In its Mission Statement, Coastal Carolina University identifies itself as a “mid-sized regional comprehensive university with a tradition of a strong liberal arts core” that “maintains a broad range of contemporary technologies, programming, support services, and innovative course offerings and delivery methods.” The mission also emphasizes CCU’s commitment of resources to building baccalaureate degrees in the humanities. In keeping with this goal, the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts proposes a Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Humanities, an undergraduate program that will allow students to combine humanities disciplines in unique ways to meet their individual interests and career goals while also developing professional skills (research, writing, and presentation) vital in today’s workforce. With its emphasis on exploring the connections that exist between traditional disciplines, this degree will model cross-
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The Philosophicum – Model Project of Philosophy of Medicine in Medical Education and Practice in Germany Perspective Article

The Philosophicum – Model Project of Philosophy of Medicine in Medical Education and Practice in Germany Perspective Article

According to Karl Jaspers, a famous German psychiatrist and philosopher of the 20 th century, the work of a physician is based on two pillars: Scientific knowledge, technical expertise being one of them and humanities, ethics and philosophy the other one [7]. The first one is taught at medical school, the other one often neglected. For that reason and in view of the preponderance of technology and digitalization in the daily routine mentioned above, an optional subject, which focuses on philosophical problems of their own profession, should be offered to medical students and physicians: To meet this demand a training in philosophy, called “Philosophicum” has been offered by the University Hospital of Wuerzburg ever since 2010 (www.philosophicum.ukw.de) [8]. Based on our experience and previous studies [9], the question is raised in this paper,
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Here be dragons? Enterprising graduates in the humanities

Here be dragons? Enterprising graduates in the humanities

As expected when discussing enterprise and entrepreneurship, the role of business schools repeatedly arose. Graduates felt that more opportunities could have been created for them to study business modules during their degrees. Currently there is often tension between business schools and humanities departments which often derives from differences in cultures and values. Additionally there are the usual administrative problems inherent in offering modules across different departments or faculties. Thus for humanities students business modules are often marginalised in the curriculum and timetable, and there is a common lack of communication between business schools and departments, ultimately resulting in students finding it difficult to include business modules within their studies. Greater exposure to the options offered by business studies was repeatedly stated as a positive way forward, enabling those students who are interested to have broader available options. Ways of integrating enterprising skills within a subject-specific curriculum were also discussed, detailed further below. General careers advice was also felt lacking by many graduates, especially in terms of discipline-specific routes – it was perceived that lecturers were removed from the disciplines in industry, and thus gave incorrect or misguided advice. Greater partnerships between industry and academia were cited as a route for improvement, giving students realistic advice and guidance as to the opportunities available to them. Such networks would also address the dearth of knowledge in the areas of legislation, guidelines, professional bodies and funding bodies – repeatedly stated as inadequately covered at degree level.
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Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Stefano Odorico is a documentary filmmaker and lec- tures in filmmaking at University College Cork, Ireland. Stefano has recently completed his PhD in film studies at same University. For his doctoral research based in docu- mentary studies, spectatorship and film theories, he was awarded the prestigious IRCHSS (Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences) Post-Graduate Scholarship in 2008-9. He has given papers at many in- ternational conferences in film and media studies. He was invited to give a keynote lecture at Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris3: ‘ Interactive Documentary and Format’ . He is the author of articles in several international journals including Film-Philosophy, Cinergie, Revista de Cinema Documentario, Off Screen and Studies in Documentary Film .
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Wednesday 13 January 2021

Wednesday 13 January 2021

Ksenia Gusarova [kgusarova@gmail.com] is a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Advanced Studies in the Humanities of the Russian State University for the Humanities, where she le[r]

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HUMANITIES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

HUMANITIES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

We all know how quickly the world changes: the impact of social media, fluctuations in the economy, awareness of climate change, and the way we engage and approach the workplace is vastly different to our parents’ day. With these changes in mind, employers are looking for graduates who are flexible and analytical, with adaptable skills that can be applied in a multitude of ways. They want people who can think critically and creatively, who can reason and who have informed opinions. That is the foundation of humanities and international studies at UOW, putting you in high demand in the workplace. In fact, for seven years in a row, employers have ranked UOW graduates in the in the top 100 universities in the world*.
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Journal of Arts & Humanities

Journal of Arts & Humanities

On that basis, the study of this research article has explained the inter-contextual relationship in the cultural text of society in the ethnochoreological realm, both between c[r]

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Replicability and replication in the humanities

Replicability and replication in the humanities

In response to this objection, I think it is important to note that there is a wide variety of methods used in the humanities. Among them are: more or less formal logic (in philosophy, theology, and law), literary analysis (in literary studies, philosophy, and theology), historical ana- lysis (in historical studies, philosophy, and theology) and various narrative approaches 36 (in historical studies), constructivism (in art theory, for instance), Socratic questioning (in philosophy), methods involving empathy (in literary studies and art studies), conceptual analysis (in philosophy and theology), the hermeneutical method (in any humanistic discipline that involves careful read- ing of texts, such as law, history, and theology), inter- views (e.g., in anthropology), and phenomenology (in philosophy). This is important to note, because, as I pointed out above, I only want to argue that replication is possible in the humanities to the extent that they are empirical. Replication may not be possible in disciplines that primarily use a deductive method and that do not collect and analyze data, such as logic, mathematics, cer- tain parts of ethics, and metaphysics. This leaves plenty of room for replication in disciplines that are empirical, such as literary studies, linguistics, history, and the study of the arts.
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Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities

Open Access Publishing Models and How OA Can Work in the Humanities

Not all progress has been top-down, though. Indeed, there are a number of scholar-led enterprises that strike me as being efficacious in moving the open agenda forward. In the UK, Open Book Publishers and Open Humanities Press have, for many years, published open access monographs. (I have, myself, published a peer-reviewed, open-access book with the former.) Running on mixed business models that combine freemium OA with a print-sales strategy, these entities are relatively small in scale, but become increasingly attractive since they do not demand an unaffordable charge from authors. The same is true of Eileen Joy's Punctum Books, a U.S.-based publisher of often-radical humanities research that has recently opened up a subscription-like service to which individuals can contribute to help with the sustainability of the press. It is also true that various open educational resource (OER) projects are making headway in the textbook and open syllabus arena.
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Promoting the past, preserving the future : British university heritage collections and identity marketing

Promoting the past, preserving the future : British university heritage collections and identity marketing

American Association of Museums Association of College and University Museums Art and Humanities Research Board Arts and Humanities Research Council Italian Association of Museums of Sci[r]

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SYMPOSIUM ON THE FUTURE OF THE HUMANITIES. School of Advanced International Studies Johns Hopkins University Washington, D.C.

SYMPOSIUM ON THE FUTURE OF THE HUMANITIES. School of Advanced International Studies Johns Hopkins University Washington, D.C.

Understanding I followed distinguished speakers who would address the ideals and potential role of the humanities in academia and beyond, and intrigued by the question of this session concerning the engagement of the public in the humanities, I will focus my reflections on the life of the humanities as lived out in the sector of higher education in which I have spent my professional career: moderately selective, small and mid-sized private institutions. My current school, Alvernia University, is a Franciscan university on the edge of a racially diverse city, educating 3,000 students of all backgrounds and ages, many from low-income families new to higher education.
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As has been argued previously (Siemens & Burr, 2013; Siemens & INKE Research Group, 2012a, 2012b, 2012e, 2013, 2014, 2015), humanists are engaging team research as a way to undertake projects that are too large in size and complexity to be completed by a single researcher. Granting agencies are encouraging this trend with new funding programs that support larger-scale research (Office of Digital Humanities, 2010; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, 2013). While researchers and other associated team members welcome these collaborations as a way to undertake these kinds of projects (Siemens & Burr, 2013; Siemens, Cunningham, Duff, & Warwick, 2011), work still needs to be done to prepare individuals for working within a team where interdependent tasks must be coordinated, knowledge and progress must be communicated, and an overall research vision must be accepted and enacted (Hara, Solomon, Kim, & Sonnenwald, 2003; Lawrence, 2006; Newell & Swan, 2000).
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Information technology and the humanities scholar : documenting digital research practices

Information technology and the humanities scholar : documenting digital research practices

relate to Jessop’s (2008) finding that humanities scholars often emphasize written language, showing an “apparent mistrust of images” (p. 283). He states humanists have low levels of visual literacy due to the lack of focus on visuals in humanities’ education, something that could be addressed to better “exploit digital visualization” (p. 289). Similarly, Heuser and Le-Khac (2011) note that using quantitative methods in the humanities raises methodological anxieties, as humanities scholars require (but do not typically receive) quantitative analysis training. Toms and O’Brien (2008) also found that more than one third of survey respondents had not received any formal computer training. Work in the digital humanities pushes the traditional boundaries of humanities
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