Immunology of the Gut

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Learning Objectives GUT IMMUNOLOGY. Case Presentation - Diane. Immune Food Allergy/Sensitivity ADVERSE REACTIONS. Immunologic (ALLERGY or SENSITIVITY)

Learning Objectives GUT IMMUNOLOGY. Case Presentation - Diane. Immune Food Allergy/Sensitivity ADVERSE REACTIONS. Immunologic (ALLERGY or SENSITIVITY)

• Foods and food additives trigger non- allergic (non-IgE mediated) immune reaction causing mediator release by immunologic cells Histamine, Serotonin Prostaglandins Leukotrienes Cyto[r]

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oa Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology - The immunology of mind control (part IV)

oa Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology - The immunology of mind control (part IV)

ver the past 50 years, a few burning questions have been at the forefront of biological science. In textbook sketches, the lymphatic system stopped at the head. All along it felt wrong and there was a feeling that blushes were inevitable. We said things such as, ‘Don’t sneeze too hard – you’re losing brain cells!’ – almost taking every last sip from the cup of our predestined human potential. We were taught that nerves could never regenerate and that you should never bump your head. We had just mastered machines and begun to peer over the edge. We became fascinated with numbers. First it was, ‘How many genes does each one of us possess?’ After discovering that it was half that of the rice plant, we panicked a little, but had to find something to do with all those counting machines. So we counted something else and turned our attention to the microbes in our gut. To our horror, we realised that they made identical neurotransmitters to our own and used the same receptors to listen in on the cross-talk as we do. Genetics, epigenetics and artificial intelligence – the pebble was now skimming across the water. Yet did we ever ask, ‘How do immune cells get into and out of the brain?’
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Immunology of dental caries: a review

Immunology of dental caries: a review

Molecular genetics approaches now offer one of the most exciting means of delivering a "subunit" vaccine which would be cost effective. The problem with subunit vaccines has been the inability to maintain sufficiently high levels of antigen in the gut to stimulate antibody production in a cost-effective manner. Recently, candidate antigen genes have been introduced into "harmless" enteric bacteria. These bacteria proliferate for some time and exhibit considerable greater staying power in the gut than simple gelatin capsules filled with antigen. This method of immunization is currently under investigation. But think about it, no microbe which can colonize a human should be considered totally"harmless." Also, some of the plasmid vectors used are marked with genes encoding antibiotic resistance 15 .
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Infections immunology of the present time pregnancy immunology

Infections immunology of the present time pregnancy immunology

Was studed and analized the changes in immune reactivity during pregnancy, the mechanisms of fetal rejection inhibition, immune infertility formation, toxicosis, the peculiarities of bac[r]

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A beginner's guide to systems simulation in immunology

A beginner's guide to systems simulation in immunology

7. Decide on the most appropriate simulation approach. This decision is made based on the characteristics of the problems, the research questions to be addressed, the scope, the level of aggregation and the experimental data avail- able. Some of the most common approaches used in immunology are agent-based modelling and simulation, discrete-event modelling and simulation, cellular au- tomata and system dynamics. Cellular automata is used for problems involving autonomous individual interactions within a neighbourhood placed in a lattice and emergent behaviour. Agent-based simulation is suitable for problems involv- ing autonomous individual behaviour, elements spacial localization, memory and emergence. Discrete-event simulation tackles problems that are process-oriented, which have passive individual entities and chronological sequence of events. Fur- thermore, each event occurs at an instant in time and marks a change of state in the system. It can be used for any experiment where there is no need for contin- uous time. SD defines a system at a high level of aggregation and, therefore, it should be used when the research question involves patterns of behaviours and feed-back interactions between the aggregates. This approach is very useful to simulate dynamics of populations and interactions between different populations overtime. For example, interactions between tumours and populations of effector cells, populations of viruses and T cells, etc.
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Immunology and Disease of Connective Tissue

Immunology and Disease of Connective Tissue

Since immune responses play a major role in the development or connective tissue diseases, it is not surprising that a number of laboratory studies reflect these responses. Prior to the 1940s when rheumatoid and LE factors became widely known, one relied mainly on erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum electrophoresis to identify protein abnormality. Ele­ vated sedimentation rate depends on rouleaux forma­ tion, and rouleaux formation is dependent upon large asymmetric molecules of fibrinogen and gamma globulin in plasma. The demonstration of gamma globulin has become the cornerstone of the immuno­ logist's edifice. It is amazing to see how the sub­ specialty or immunology has mushroomed to involve the many facets of disease processes such as con­ nective tissue diseases, skin diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, renal diseases, and cancer. More recently, immune deficiency diseases have included the pe­ diatrician in the ever-enlarging field of immunology as has the modern-day discovery of human leukocyte antigen (H L-A) testing and tissue typing included the geneticist.
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Cancer: The Great Challenge for Immunology

Cancer: The Great Challenge for Immunology

of this field to the understanding and control of can­ cer. The trademark of immunology is prevention of disease by immunization. With the discovery of anti­ biotics and their use in tissue cultures. a fresh attack upon many viral infections became possible. In the past two decades. the cultivation of viruses in vitro has resulted in the elimination of epidemics of po­ liomyelitis: infection with measles virus is less com­ mon. Where the human is the sole host and reservoir of an infection. immunization may lead to the eradi­ cation of a disease. This appears to be the attainable goal in smallpox where we are at the threshold of its eradication by intensive immunization and epidemio­ logic field work.
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The immunology of hydrocephalus shunt infections

The immunology of hydrocephalus shunt infections

1.) To establish a test for the detection of staphylococcal colonisation in ventriculoperitoneal shunts and to observe IgM/IgG antibody changes during the course of t[r]

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Primer on tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy

Primer on tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy

become “ exhausted ”. Whereas memory T cells require IL-7 and IL-15 for main- tenance, exhausted T cells appear to be maintained via continued exposure to antigen. Exhausted T cells also[r]

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Physiology and immunology of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway

Physiology and immunology of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway

Intracerebral administration of muscarine agonists also stimulates an increase in vagus nerve signaling to the heart as measured by increasing instantaneous heart rate variability, a res[r]

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STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

Response to immunization of 9 infants from 2 to 6 months of age who carried passive (transplacental) antitoxin, compared with normal mean response (ringed-dot curve) of infants with- out[r]

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An Optimal Control Approach to HIV Immunology

An Optimal Control Approach to HIV Immunology

It is worth reinforcing that, in relation to typical HIV models that simulate the production rates and infectability of the virus, the proposed model includes two new variables in the dy[r]

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Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology Awards

Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology Awards

The Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology has created four named awards to honour past leaders in our department, reward exceptional and innovative research, teaching and service, and to strengthen our pride and ownership in our department. The namesakes of these awards all had a passion for discovery, a commitment to fostering curiosity in our students and a drive for excellence. These awards have been designed to reward recent success and innovation by faculty and students.

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Stem Cells, Cancer, Immunology and Aging

Stem Cells, Cancer, Immunology and Aging

- banks and credit institutions. You may contact the processing controller and persons in charge in order to exercise your rights as set forth in article 7 of Legislative Decree no. [r]

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Immunology and Genetics of Type 1 Diabetes

Immunology and Genetics of Type 1 Diabetes

The fact that in humans the highest risk-conferring locus linked to the disease is the HLA cluster and, in particular, HLA genes encoding specific class II alleles strongly indicates an [r]

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Allergy and Related Testing Allergy & Immunology Awareness Program. Prepared by: Dr. Mehdi Adeli Senior Consultant Allergy and Immunology

Allergy and Related Testing Allergy & Immunology Awareness Program. Prepared by: Dr. Mehdi Adeli Senior Consultant Allergy and Immunology

If your prick skin tests are negative but your physician still suspects you might have allergies, more sensitive “intradermal” tests may be used in which a small amount of allergen i[r]

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The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

Thus, Treg which accumulate in situ and in the peripheral circulation of cancer patients can be viewed as one of multiple attempts by the tumor to promote its own escape from the host[r]

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STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

In order to obtain data for another antigen- antibody system, the authors injected a smaller number of infants with a single dose of 163 Lf tetanus toxoid on alum.. This dosage of tetanu[r]

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STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

Antibody response was compared with that of a group of term infants immunized at birth, most of whom have been previ- ously reported upon.. From the Department of Pediatrics, New York Un[r]

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STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

Diphtheria antitoxin was selected as the antibody for study because (1) its measurement is rela- tively simple and quantitatively accurate and (2) a large number of mothers will normally[r]

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