Impacts: anti-social behaviour and crime

Top PDF Impacts: anti-social behaviour and crime:

Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill

Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill

To make provision about anti-social behaviour, crime and disorder, including provision about recovery of possession of dwelling-houses; to make provision amending the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, Schedules 7 and 8 to the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Extradition Act 2003; to make provision about firearms and about forced marriage; to make provision about the police, the Independent Police Complaints Commission and the Serious Fraud Office; to make provision about criminal justice and court fees; and for connected purposes.

157 Read more

Crime Reduction Basics - tackling crime and anti-social behaviour in the community

Crime Reduction Basics - tackling crime and anti-social behaviour in the community

Community & Partnership Working A further outcome and one that is difficult to measure, is the impact this project has on reducing fear of crime. The residents are taking pride in their area. Time spent in gardens and allotments can improve relationships amongst neighbours and their participation in the scheme encourages them to get to know other residents, building community networks. The ‘feelgood factor’ of any project is difficult to record, but living in a pleasant environment, where the community takes a pro-active role in keeping it that way is sure to have many positive impacts on the area.
Show more

80 Read more

Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014: Reform of anti-social behaviour powers Statutory guidance for frontline professionals

Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014: Reform of anti-social behaviour powers Statutory guidance for frontline professionals

Dealing with young people: Applicants must consult the local youth offending team (YOT) if the application is against someone under the age of 18 and inform any other body or individual the applicant thinks appropriate, for example, a youth charity that is already working with the young person. Although the consultation requirement does not mean that the YOT can veto the application, it is important that applicants fully consider and take into account representations from the YOT as part of developing good partnership working in cases involving young people. YOTs play a central role in preventing and reducing anti-social behaviour by young people, working with them to try and help them stay away from crime. For more information on YOTs and how to find your local team you should visit https://www.gov.uk/youth-offending-team.
Show more

68 Read more

The Anti social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014: implications for sex workers and their clients

The Anti social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014: implications for sex workers and their clients

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 introduced new powers to deal with behaviour deemed to be “anti-social”. In this paper we consider how the new law could be used against sex workers and their clients and the impact this may have. Although the new powers were not intentionally designed to respond to prostitution, we suggest that they will be utilised to tackle it. We argue that the law will be used inconsistently in a way which will go directly against policy which seeks to ‘tackle demand’ and take a less punitive approach to dealing with sex workers. Despite a policy shift to see sex workers more as victims and less as offenders, we draw on existing evidence to demonstrate that the new ASBO law will be utilised to exclude street sex workers from public spaces. We claim that a degree of ‘policy re-fraction’ will occur when the new laws are implemented by practitioners.
Show more

31 Read more

The Anti social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014:implications for sex workers and their clients

The Anti social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014:implications for sex workers and their clients

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 introduced new powers to deal with behaviour deemed to be “anti-social”. In this paper we consider how the new law could be used against sex workers and their clients and the impact this may have. Although the new powers were not intentionally designed to respond to prostitution, we suggest that they will be utilised to tackle it. We argue that the law will be used inconsistently in a way which will go directly against policy which seeks to ‘tackle demand’ and take a less punitive approach to dealing with sex workers. Despite a policy shift to see sex workers more as victims and less as offenders, we draw on existing evidence to demonstrate that the new ASBO law will be utilised to exclude street sex workers from public spaces. We claim that a degree of ‘policy re-fraction’ will occur when the new laws are implemented by practitioners.
Show more

30 Read more

Anti-Social Behaviour Order Protocol for Dorset, Poole and Bournemouth Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships

Anti-Social Behaviour Order Protocol for Dorset, Poole and Bournemouth Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships

This protocol sets out the procedures agreed by the Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships for considering and making applications for Anti Social Behaviour Orders and for the variation and discharge of an ASBO. However, the core principles of partnership working, clarity and efficiency of process, access, consultation and an outcome focused problem solving

16 Read more

The Economic, Financial & Social Impacts of Organised Crime in the EU

The Economic, Financial & Social Impacts of Organised Crime in the EU

Finally, we wish to consider the enforcement costs of digital piracy. Digital IP rights are not consistently recognized throughout the EU. A notable example is the Netherlands where downloading digital media is not a crime so long as it is for private use (Roxborough, 2012). Moreover, a fundamental discrepancy in the definition of an IP violation exists throughout the EU as well. Accordingly, given the discrepancies in how the crime is defined and counted, an accurate estimate of the impacts of counterfeiting and piracy and the costs related to enforcement of digital IP rights is dependent on a country by country analysis (Frontier Economics, 2011). Neither the private nor public sector costs of IP protection are readily available, and this report does not attempt a cost-benefit analysis of defence costs. Whether motivated by ideology or by economic interests, or a combination, substantial effort is put into counter-measures from both IP attackers and defenders. Attempts to block popular bit-torrent websites, such as the Pirate Bay, in the UK may have discouraged some users; nonetheless, such websites remain accessible via mirror sites. Given the current procedures in place, it is unlikely that the UK government could successfully block mirror sites since they are set up in anticipation of the blocking or shutdown of the principal sites, thus creating a pattern of diminishing returns to the cost-effectiveness of current efforts. An unintended effect of the successful prosecution of casual downloaders could result in the return of piracy rings that sell pirated copies of digital products on the street. As the industry notes, these types of rings are run by individuals who use the proceeds to fund organized criminal groups that intend to commit other organized criminal acts (Treverton et al., 2009).
Show more

86 Read more

Preventing children's involvement in crime and anti-social behaviour : a literature review : a paper produced for the National Evaluation of the Children's Fund

Preventing children's involvement in crime and anti-social behaviour : a literature review : a paper produced for the National Evaluation of the Children's Fund

The Youth Justice Board Research Note 5 (2001) 8 provides the most recent comprehensive review of relevant research on risk and protective factors in relation to children’s involvement in crime and anti-social behaviour, and is the principal source for this section (see also Farrington 2002 for a condensed authoritative overview). It reflects and builds upon Farrington (1996) and Rutter et al (1998) – the two major UK reviews up to that time – in distinguishing between individual, psychosocial and society wide features of risk factors. These factors can themselves be both causal and symptomatic of what is broadly referred to as anti-social behaviour, that is, they may be factors that generate anti-social behaviour or they may be factors that are a result of anti-social behaviour. However, it notes that reviews of longitudinal research and meta-analyses have identified connections which are more clearly causal, and can be further differentiated as either direct/proximal or distant/distal. Perhaps the most crucial theme noted is that delinquency, conceived of as entrenched but low-level offending, seems to arise from the way in which: ‘…multiple risk factors cluster
Show more

78 Read more

The affinity between online and offline anti-Muslim hate crime: Dynamics and impacts

The affinity between online and offline anti-Muslim hate crime: Dynamics and impacts

Following the recent terrorist attacks in Paris and Tunisia in 2015, and in Woolwich, south-east London where British Army soldier Drummer Lee Rigby was murdered in 2013, there has seen a significant increase in anti-Muslim attacks. These incidents have occurred offline where mosques have been vandalized, Muslim women have had their hijab (headscarf) or niqab (face veil) pulled off, Muslim men have been attacked, and racist graffiti has been scrawled against Muslim properties. Concurrently, there has been a spike in anti-Muslim hostility online, where Muslims have been targeted by campaigns of cyber bullying, cyber harassment, cyber incitement and threats of offline violence. Against this background, we examine the nature and impacts of online and offline anti-Muslim hate crime. We draw on our different experiences of conducting research on anti-Muslim hate crime, using two independent research projects in order to consider the affinity between online and offline anti-Muslim hate crime. We argue that, in reality, online/offline boundaries may be more blurred than the terms imply. For victims, it is often difficult to isolate the online threats from the intimidation, violence and abuse that they suffer offline. Moreover, victims often live in fear because of the possibility of online threats materialising in the ‘real world’. We conclude that there is a continuity of anti-Muslim hostility in both the virtual and the physical world, especially in the globalized world.
Show more

25 Read more

Social housing legal responses to crime and anti social behaviour: impacts on vulnerable families

Social housing legal responses to crime and anti social behaviour: impacts on vulnerable families

5.2.2 The child protection connection In a few cases there is an express reference to child protection concerns or actual proceedings. As indicated in the previous chapter, one case—the only one of its kind—involved illegal use termination proceedings being taken against a tenant for allegedly harbouring a child in contravention of a protection order that would have placed the child in the custody of a child protection officer; the termination proceedings were dismissed because it appeared the order had yet to formally take effect at the time of the ‘harbouring’. In a number of cases, such as those of MGN and TRB, children are currently absent from the household, and what is at stake is a home to which they might return, and hence the reunification of the family. In another case, a social housing landlord appears to have waited until children were removed before taking termination proceedings on grounds of damage; in that case the tribunal declined to terminate, primarily because the damage was historic and not continuing, but also with a view to the tenant regaining custody of her children in the home.
Show more

84 Read more

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014

Approaching case reviews Case reviews are intended to provide an opportunity to assess what action has been taken in response to previous complaints and, where the problem behaviour persists, bring agencies together to identify a more joined- up, problem-solving response for the victim concerned. Beyond meeting the statutory requirements for the trigger threshold, the legislation does not prescribe how case review requests should be assessed, what reviews should look like or how they should run, so this will largely be for local areas to agree.

31 Read more

The Impact of the Design and Layout of Car Parking
on Crime and Anti Social Behaviour

The Impact of the Design and Layout of Car Parking on Crime and Anti Social Behaviour

Where garages cannot be provided, what is the safest form of parking? How safe is underground parking? What impact are planning policies designed to remove the car from the street scene having upon crime and ASB? Recent and imminent changes in both planning policy and policing provision, increase the importance of ensuring that research findings are conveyed in a clear and comprehensible format. Practitioners (with increased workloads and reduced numbers) and newly formed community and locally based bodies need to be able to extract the relevant implications and apply these to proposed developments within their area. For this reason, this series of briefing notes will not dwell on the complex methodology or detailed analysis; rather it will focus upon the key recommendations for policy and practice.
Show more

8 Read more

Nipping Crime in the Bud? The Use of Anti-Social Behaviour Interventions with Young People in England and Wales

Nipping Crime in the Bud? The Use of Anti-Social Behaviour Interventions with Young People in England and Wales

More generally, the senior practitioners maintained that minor cases which appeared in the youth court a decade ago were no longer doing so , driven by a recognition that ‘young people need to be dealt with as low down as possible’ in the criminal justice process. To date, there are no official data on, or empirical studies of, the use of the orders that have replaced the ASBO. As noted above, however, the ASBO was the least used of the key sanctions. This paper has focused on other, more widely used, informal and voluntary measures that remain central to ongoing strategies of behaviour regulation. It could be argued that ASB warning letters, ABCs and ASBOs also contributed (intentionally or otherwise) to recent youth justice trends. The findings discussed here, however, preclude such a simplistic conclusion.
Show more

22 Read more

Innovative Practice in Tackling Anti- Social Behaviour: Guidance for members of Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships

Innovative Practice in Tackling Anti- Social Behaviour: Guidance for members of Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships

The Honeywood Garden project in Gedling and the CASPAR projects in Northampton are illustrative of the important role that residents can play in identifying priority issues and developing effective interventions (see below): Honeywood Gardens, Gedling, is a high density 1960’s private housing estate of 800 mainly owner-occupied dwellings. The estate lies mostly within Gedling Borough council area, partly within the boundary of Nottingham City Council, and Nottinghamshire County Council also has some responsibilities, including education and social services, for the area. Although primarily owner-occupied, various social and private landlords own some houses on the estate in a complex pattern of ownership. By 2000, house prices on the estate were falling, graffiti, vandalism and fly tipping were clearly a problem, and some shops in the small precinct had failed. The garage areas had become a dumping ground for burnt-out cars,and were areas where youths congregated. Burglary of dwellings was much higher on the estate (16% of all recorded crimes) than in the borough as a whole (7%). The layout of the estate made it difficult to police; it was described by police as a
Show more

29 Read more

The Impact of Connectivity and Through Movement
within Residential Developments on Levels of Crime
and Anti Social Behaviour

The Impact of Connectivity and Through Movement within Residential Developments on Levels of Crime and Anti Social Behaviour

Are some cul-de-sac designs safer than others? Can footpaths be included within a development without increasing crime risks? How safe are gated developments? Recent and imminent changes in both planning policy and policing provision, increase the importance of ensuring that research findings are conveyed in a clear and comprehensible format. Practitioners (with increased workloads and reduced numbers) and newly formed community and locally based bodies need to be able to extract the relevant implications and apply these to proposed developments within their area. For this reason, this series of briefing notes will not dwell on the complex research methodology or detailed analysis; rather it will focus upon the key recommendations for policy and practice.
Show more

13 Read more

Tendring Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership. Anti-Social Behaviour Strategy and Protocol. Victims Come First

Tendring Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership. Anti-Social Behaviour Strategy and Protocol. Victims Come First

Acceptable behaviour contracts (ABCs) are voluntary agreements made between people involved in anti-social behaviour and the local police, the local authority, the registered social landlord, or the perpetrator's school. They are flexible in terms of content and format. Initially introduced in the London Borough of Islington to deal with problems on estates being caused by young people aged between 10 and 17, they are now used with adults as well as young people, and in a wide variety of circumstances. They have proved effective as a means of encouraging young adults, children, and importantly, parents to take responsibility for unacceptable behaviour. They are being used to improve the quality of life for local people by tackling behaviour such as harassment, graffiti, criminal damage and verbal abuse. ABCs last for six months.
Show more

50 Read more

Prevention and Reduction: A review of strategies for intervening early to prevent or reduce youth crime and anti-social behaviour

Prevention and Reduction: A review of strategies for intervening early to prevent or reduce youth crime and anti-social behaviour

The Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP) attempts to provide an ‘end-to-end approach’ from prevention to enforcement in aiming to reduce the carrying of knives, related homicides and serious stabbings among teenagers in ten police force areas. TKAP works closely with schools to educate young people about the dangers of carrying knives, gives more and longer custodial sentences to those in possession of knives and offensive weapons, and increases targeted stop and searches to deter young people from carrying knives but does not by programme definition include any of the key factors associated with programme effectiveness. Ward and Diamond (2009) compare findings between TKAP and non-TKAP areas and report an overall decline in recorded knife crime and hospital admissions in the target age group during the TKAP period, but underlying differences in the areas prior to the initiative limit the extent to which these results can be attributed to programme.
Show more

87 Read more

REPORTING A CRIME SUPPORT FOR VICTIMS ALCOHOL ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR DRUGS & THE LAW OFFENSIVE WEAPONS STOP AND SEARCH

REPORTING A CRIME SUPPORT FOR VICTIMS ALCOHOL ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR DRUGS & THE LAW OFFENSIVE WEAPONS STOP AND SEARCH

These are voluntary agreements made between the people responsible for committing the anti-social behaviour, the local police, or local authority. An ABC can be given to anyone, regardless of how old they are. The contract sets out the behaviour that is expected of the individual. By signing the agreement, the person agrees to stop the anti-social behaviour and follow the requirements of the contract.

28 Read more

Tackling Anti–Social Behaviour

Tackling Anti–Social Behaviour

Q91 Mr Mitchell: So the areas that you are concerned with are kind of super-output areas, where there is a lot of poverty or a lot of old people? Ms Casey: The perception and experience of anti- social behaviour are greater in deprived areas, definitely. However, the data in this Report is from when we asked them to put this question in the local government user satisfaction survey for the first time, so that we could have the first cut, really. We had the British crime survey, which is the Home OYce’s main tool for things, and we wanted the local government survey to do the same thing. Lots of diVerent things can aVect the perception locally, but it comes back to the fact that by now, in 2007, one of the things that we must encourage all these areas to do is to be upfront with local people about what they are doing to tackle the problems and how they are tackling them. Hull and Grimsby—I know both areas well and have done a number of visits to both—need to become more eVective—
Show more

53 Read more

Anti-social behaviour policy

Anti-social behaviour policy

Vandalism and damage to property Harassment/verbal abuse/threatening behaviour. We will give priority to cases of domestic abuse and hate crime because we recognise the impact that these offences can have on both individuals and communities, and the need to ensure that every person has a right to live in their home free from such behaviour.

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...