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Optimistic Scheduling: facilitating the collaboration by prioritizing the individual needs

Optimistic Scheduling: facilitating the collaboration by prioritizing the individual needs

Summarizing, the most dominating trends appear in coherence with the current technological climate [18] that pushes towards a progressive socialization of tools and applications. The main limitation of those products look the base model itself: shared activities are always scheduled with a kind of implicit high priority established a priori and somehow passively "pushed" to individuals. The model proposed in this paper works with a completely opposite logic and pretends to push the cooperation or collaboration among people by priorizing individual needs. Even though it can appear like a contradiction, we are pretty confident that this approach can suit the requirements of emerging organizational models, as well as the philosophy of many professionals and cutting-edge organizational models.

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Matching gerontechnologies to independent living seniors’ individual needs: development of the GTM tool

Matching gerontechnologies to independent living seniors’ individual needs: development of the GTM tool

Co-creation session two was held a week later to fur- ther develop ideas to improve the matchmaking service and make these ideas applicable in practice. One re- searcher presented the most important ambitions and first ideas that had emerged in session one in a logical order. Members recognized themselves strongly in this narrative and added a few new ideas for possible im- provement. In the ensuing discussion, consensus was reached with regard to which ideas in where deemed most promising to include in a matchmaking tool. In the second part of the session, two further exercises where carried out to facilitate the co-creation of the matchmak- ing tool. First, a researcher presented more in depth in- sights from the C-TAILS model. In exploring more thoroughly personal and contextual factors that may im- pact successful technology acquirement and use by se- niors, informed decisions could be made about topics that should be included in matchmaking tool. Second, the group created a “ client journey ” with all moments of contact between seniors and members of the IZI project team leading up to and including the matchmaking dia- logues with technology consultants [43]. As a result of these two exercises, the group was able to determine who knew what and when about seniors’ individual needs and circumstances. This also led to a discussion about how working arrangements between project mem- bers should be optimized to accommodate the imple- mentation of the matchmaking tool. Based on these insights, the basic structure and content of the tool, as well as new ways of working together, were established.

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Changes in individual needs for care and quality of life in Assertive Community Treatment patients: an observational study

Changes in individual needs for care and quality of life in Assertive Community Treatment patients: an observational study

As needs for care are related to the different stages of a patients’ illness [3], the relation between needs for care and QoL may be very complex. For instance, a patient suffering from acute and severe psychiatric symptoms may have a different pattern of unmet needs – such as needs for help with self-care, safety to self and the treatment of psychotic symptoms – than a patient in symptomatic remission, who may have needs with respect to daytime activities, company and intimate relationships. It is therefore insufficient to study merely the change in the total number of unmet needs, as a different pattern of needs may underlie the total number of needs, thereby concealing changes in individual needs [10]. A more promising method may thus be to study changes in individual met and unmet needs in relation to changes in QoL over time [11].

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Establishing LAAs and managing individual needs Overview report

Establishing LAAs and managing individual needs Overview report

the benefits need be emphasised continuously and new benefits can be added or reformulated to nurture the interest of existing and new participants. All LAAs have seen fluctuations in participation and commitment from members and project related work was especially effective at sustaining interest. The YHLAA for example, comprising mainly municipal water engineers, has provided a vehicle for participants to engage in new regulations and standards, providing a consensual alliance response as a group to consultations and draft regulations regarding flood risk management in England. As well as learning from one another, this co-generation of formal responses can obviate the need for individuals’ to respond by themselves to such consultations. Part of this process involves ‘telling stories together’, i.e. hearing others’ experiences and developing a consistent narrative as to how proposed regulations would unfold in practice. Also, the institutional and personal barriers should be surmounted, enabling participants to present their own opinion and not only of the institution they are representing. Each participant will have different expectations of the purpose and outcomes of a LAA. This ‘framing’ by individuals’ and also by the organisation they belong to and may represent, needs to be understood (Lems et al, 2012). They need to feel respected, listened to and be part of the group if their interest is to be maintained. Leaders, coordinators and facilitators need to prepare well for this. Traditional ‘engineering’ technocratic approaches to devising flood risk management schemes are nowadays rarely

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How to meet patients' individual needs for drug information - a scoping review

How to meet patients' individual needs for drug information - a scoping review

needs with one of the key words “patient information,” “drug information,” “medication information,” and “medicines information” in title/abstract, English or German language, and with a publishing date between January 2000 and February 2017 were searched. The search purposefully identified potentially relevant studies that were subsequently clustered into two groups: the first group 1) comprised stud- ies analyzing patients’ enquiries to drug information hotlines and services, while the second group 2) comprised qualita- tive studies evaluating patient drug information needs. From the identified studies in the first group, the total number of drug-related enquiries, the enquiry topics, the provider of the information service, and the timeframe of data enquiry were extracted. The enquiry topics were classified according to those previously defined in the respective study by the authors. From the second group, the study design, popula- tion, study site, and raised drug information needs were extracted.

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Developing health information literacy in disadvantaged and dependent circumstances : the everyday role of Family Nurses

Developing health information literacy in disadvantaged and dependent circumstances : the everyday role of Family Nurses

All participants discussed dealing with multiple and varied information needs on an individual basis. For example, one commented, “all clients are different”, and another, “everybody’s individual”. Participants also discussed how individual needs could be difficult to elicit. For example, one commented, “Some of the clients can be really quiet you know... and they might not feedback much”, and another, “I have one client who is very, very quiet... I think she potentially finds it difficult to communicate verbally”. Low self-esteem and confidence were considered significant contributory factors. For example, one commented, “...she has lots of issues with low esteem and low confidence coming from her own adverse childhood experiences”, and another, “Sometimes they don’t want to know. Sometimes they don’t have the confidence”. Such issues impeded effective interactions. For example, one participant commented, “...they feel really judged... they don’t want to ask questions so that’s not helpful, they don’t fully talk about the issues which they have because they think somebody is going to judge them”. Individual learning needs were also highlighted. For example, one participant commented, “...some don’t have the literacy skills, they are not able to read and write”.

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Every Student Counts: Using Customer Relationship Management to Strengthen Terry D. Alkire, Natalie A. Lupton, Robert A. Lupton

Every Student Counts: Using Customer Relationship Management to Strengthen Terry D. Alkire, Natalie A. Lupton, Robert A. Lupton

Satisfying the needs of customers is one of the main tenants of a successful CRM retention plan. According to Peppers and Rogers (2004), satisfaction is one of six mediating variables required for relationships to form between a customer and an enterprise. For CRM to succeed, an enterprise’s constituents must have knowledge of and be aligned to the needs of its customers (Buttle, 2009; Stringfellow, Nie & Bowen, 2004).In the context of higher education, universities are increasingly being identified as service providers and, as such, they are finding themselves focusing more and more on the needs of their students (Gruber et al., 2012).There is no question that college students have needs they seek to have satisfied as they enter higher education. Student needs satisfaction have many categories, but those that take precedence in the retention literature are: financial (Wetzel, O’Toole & Peterson, 1999), social (Terenzini & Pascarella, 1980; Bean & Eaton, 2001) and post-graduation career assistance. Bowden (2011) states that student satisfaction is positively correlated to peer recommendations, retention and return on investment. Seymour (1993) proposes that developing satisfied customers should be a primary goal of higher education. DeShields, Kara and Kaynak (2005) concur that enhancing customer satisfaction is crucial in developing student value. By understanding student satisfaction, educational institutions can align their organizational structure, enrollment and retention processes to become more customer-centric (DeShields, Kara & Kaynak, 2005).Based on these discussions, we arrived at the first hypothesis:

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The Role of Motivation on Institutional Development: Selecting the Appropriate Theory for Milton Margai College of Education and Technology

The Role of Motivation on Institutional Development: Selecting the Appropriate Theory for Milton Margai College of Education and Technology

All organizations are concerned with what should be done to achieve sustained high levels of performance through people. This means giving close attention to how individuals can best be motivated through such means as incentives, rewards, leadership and, importantly, the work they do and the organizational context within which they carry out that work. The aim is to develop motivation processes and a work environment that will help to ensure that individuals deliver results in accordance with the expectations of management. Motivation theory examines the process of motivation. It explains why people at work behave in the way they do in terms of their efforts and the directions they are taking. It describes what organizations can do to encourage people to apply their efforts and abilities in ways that will further the achievement of the organization‟s goals as well as satisfy their own needs. It is also concerned with job satisfaction – the factors that create it and its impact on performance. In understanding and applying motivation theory, the aim is to obtain added value through people in the sense that the value of their output exceeds the cost of generating it.

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The relationship between individual and social factors with career development at UMLand Berhad, Southern Region

The relationship between individual and social factors with career development at UMLand Berhad, Southern Region

Career planning is not a new concept in the study of career management. In the late 1980’s, Hall & Associates (1986) defined career planning as a deliberate process for becoming aware of self, opportunities, constraints, choices and consequences, as well as identifying career related goals, and programming for work, education, and related developmental experience to provide the direction, timing and sequence of steps to attain specific career related goals. They viewed career planning as an initiative where an individual exerts control over their career and engages in informed choices as to his occupation, organization, job assignment and self-development. Then, there were Leibowitz, Farren and Kaye (1986) who concurred and stated that individuals are responsible for initiating their own career planning and seeking out their career options in order to set goals and establish their career plans.

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Eliminating suffering through the birth of metta  : a critical hermeneutic inquiry of the identity and ethical intention of selected monks of Burma

Eliminating suffering through the birth of metta : a critical hermeneutic inquiry of the identity and ethical intention of selected monks of Burma

worked closely with SRVUSD as refinements were made to new teacher training and support. The district’s assessment model of using an Inquiry Action Plan approach (Appendix L) as a goal setting device for new teachers, was a document that could be shared with other BTSA programs. School districts and BTSA consortia that resist the mandated changes in SB 1209 will continue to subject their new teachers to endless amounts of paperwork, pointless after school/weekend meetings, duplication of their pre- service programs, and training sessions that may not meet the actual classroom needs of teachers. These are just three of the areas highlighted in the 2007 Technical Report published by UC Riverside/Rand Corporation. SRVUSD forged a new direction for its induction program, and from information gathered through dialogues with the researcher, it was clear that these changes have been very effective. All of the eight teachers (PTs) and four mentors interviewed for this study indicated a high level of satisfaction with the direction the program has taken over the past two years. They were hopeful that

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A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Health Service Executive

A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Health Service Executive

Once these assessments were completed some residents were managing their own finances with minimal support from staff where others required substantial staff input and support. However, the inspector saw that personal finances were being managed in conjunction with each resident and there were robust systems in place to ensure that all individual monies could be accurately accounted for.

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Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies

Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies

Although hospital and community pharmacists have differ- ent responsibilities in regard to the settings in which they practice their profession, they still share a common role in maintaining EBM practice for their patients. EBM is a way to promote rational use of medicine, ie, ensuring that patients receive “medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community”. For rational consumption of medicine, the cooperation of the pharmacist is as crucial as the prescriptions given by the doctors. 21–23 However,

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Improving access to effective care for people with chronic respiratory symptoms in low and middle income countries.

Improving access to effective care for people with chronic respiratory symptoms in low and middle income countries.

The lack of availability of basic effective treatments for airways diseases is a key factor limiting the management of these conditions. The essential treatments in them- selves are relatively straightforward as are guidelines for their use [21]. Effective chronic disease management of all the conditions requires education and partnership to ensure avoidance of triggers (e.g. allergens) and disease drivers (e.g. exposure to tobacco and other biomass smoke), sputum clearance, correct use of medication, monitoring of the disease and prompt institution of action plans in the event of exacerbation and ongoing supplies of medication that often needs to continue life- long. These interventions require health promotion in its widest sense including ‘ structural interventions ’ to address the underlying drivers of health risks, since the poorest and most marginalized may be those least able to make choices and to avoid triggers or drivers of disease [22] [CAHRD Paper LH Biomass].

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IJCSMC, Vol. 2, Issue. 8, August 2013, pg.257 – 261 RESEARCH ARTICLE An Overview of Biometric Identifiers with Emphasis on the Concept and Applications of Finger Vein Recognition

IJCSMC, Vol. 2, Issue. 8, August 2013, pg.257 – 261 RESEARCH ARTICLE An Overview of Biometric Identifiers with Emphasis on the Concept and Applications of Finger Vein Recognition

 Gait: Gait biometrics identifies an entity via the way he walks or sequence of his foot movements. It is not influenced by the speed of the person’s walk. [15] It allows recognition at a distance even there is low resolution & poor illumination. Lastly the style of walking/identification can be affected by the surface whether sloppy or uphill, and depending on whatever the individual is wearing. [8]

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The Conceptual Universe database schema: Design issues and decisions

The Conceptual Universe database schema: Design issues and decisions

Because of the complexity of the LRS Join and because it is unconventional, it is not available as a standard database operation. Rather, it must be programmed. This leads to questions regarding its speed of operation because of the large number of comparisons that must be made and the fact that every record in the file must be examined to do each comparison. Furthermore, there are on the order of up to 200,000 records in some universe files and, in the future, there could be more. To explore the efficiency of the LRS Join tests were conducted using ORACLE to evaluate the speed of multi attribute joins. Two and three table LRS Joins were executed. Both processed the tests in seconds. As a result, it is expected that nearly all typical multi attribute queries that would need to be answered could be processed in speeds that more than meet stakeholder needs. 2.4.4.1 Distributed Topology and Geometry Tests

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Effects of Business Training Needs Analysis on Competencies of Trainees: The Kenyan Experienc

Effects of Business Training Needs Analysis on Competencies of Trainees: The Kenyan Experienc

This model proposes application of a systematic approach to transfer of competencies. It asserts that the learners and the trainers jointly identify the training needs of the trainees using training needs analysis (TNA) techniques such as organizational, operational, man and task analyzes. The second phase of the Model comprise designing of the training interventions which includes planning, and preparation of the training programmes followed by actual implementation of the training programmes. The final phase of a HRD Cycle Model is evaluation, in which learners` levels of the competencies are assessed from learning, behavioural to impact levels of competencies (Mankin, 2009).This model was found quite useful to this study in that it provided strong basis for understanding conventional processes of executing HRD interventions. Borrowing from the tenets of this Model, business trainers and trainees in the study areas ought to have carried out TNA. This Model stipulates that TNA exercises help bring forth competency gaps for which a HRD interventions would be designed and implemented. The target business trainees in the study areas had three (3) groups namely, women, youths and self-help groups whose background characteristics may differ in terms of education, gender, ages, business exposure among other parameters. Thus the Model asserts that the learning needs of different target beneficiaries ought to be established and ascertained (Banfield& Kay, 2008).

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Innovations and Curriculum Development for Engineering and Technical Education in Libya

Innovations and Curriculum Development for Engineering and Technical Education in Libya

Universities are exploring ways to revise the engineering curriculum in order to meet the changing needs of industry and society. Any restructuring of an engineering curriculum must take into account the correlation between society, engineering competencies and the changing paradigm of engineering education [33]. The ‘employability’ of graduates depends on a combination of high technical knowledge, practical experience and soft skills. Decreasing student enrolment figures in engineering in many countries call for appropriate measures to be implemented including the development of attractive programmes of study and challenging learning environments. In construction of engineering curriculum three aspects have been neglected: (i) students background in the light of formal and informal experience and interests, (ii) student/student interactions, (iii) teacher/student interaction [33].

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Meeting individual learning needs: Is traditional assessment system best solution in school “XYZ international"

Meeting individual learning needs: Is traditional assessment system best solution in school “XYZ international"

“XYZ INTERNATIONAL” is a school from preparatory classes to class-12 which follows CBSE pattern. School management is keen to provide quality education along with inculcating good moral values, proper physical & mental growth of its students. This school is performing good academically & financially, yet, the management is interested in improvements, whatsoever, to align itself with new ways of teaching/learning/collaborative learning so that school’s reputation is enhanced. With this objective, school management invited one of the reputed consulting firms “PALASH” to study the school’s systems & working and suggest improvements in various functional areas. PALASH critically analysed and found that school is taking only marks scored in tests as a measure to find whether a student is brilliant or not. The way this routine activity is conducted leaves behind a big question mark about the objective(s) of conducting such activity as it simply informs about the level of learning of some specific part of the subject by each student considering that Test Paper is prepared carefully so that it tested the learning properly? But this whole activity is silent about any remedial measures to be taken. Many students attaining the same percentage of marks may or may not have same need as one of them may have performed good in questions involving a particular concept while performed bad in questions involving another concept but same is not true for other student who share the same percentage of marks. Considering parents view/suggestion, it is the assessment & its reporting system which should be looked into and should be improved. Therefore, study of prevailing assessment system and its adequacy in present scenario is a matter of concern for the consulting firm. If prevailing assessment system is not adequate then what system is best for the school. Keywords:Learning needs, Traditional Assesment, School Management, Teaching ways, Remedial measures

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Childhood And Adolescence: Prevention And Health Promotion Models

Childhood And Adolescence: Prevention And Health Promotion Models

This part refers to the separation of the concepts prevention at the level of conditions and prevention at the level of behaviour. Prevention at the level of conditions refers to unhealthy conditions prevailing in the human environment. The goal of prevention at the level of behaviour is to prevent behavioural disorders through influencing lifestyle. The idea of interventions at the level of conditions assumes that individual behaviour is dependent on environmental conditions. A person must be approached in such a way as to change the ecological and social conditions that are responsible for the state of that person's life. To influence behaviour, health risks related to environmental conditions and living conditions are controlled, reduced or eliminated. Preventing measures at the level of conditions are mostly carried out on the basis of laws and decrees (a ban on installing automatic cigarette vending machines in the school yard, compulsory seatbelt use, a ban on smoking in public services). The advantage of prevention at the level of conditions is that the target individuals are directly approached, and most often they cannot avoid the measure (Roth et al., 2003). Prevention measures at the level of behaviour refer to the individual, namely to the environment where the person lives, to the biographical surroundings and personal resources (personal abilities, capabilities of action) of a human being (Laaser et al., 1993). With information and advice on health, health education, health training and preventive medicine and/or self-help in health issues, a person not only changes the way he/she copes with dangerous to health behaviours, such as smoking, drinking and drugs, polyphagia and inadequate nutrition, lack of movement, anxiety, but also the behaviour itself. People need to be informed about health risks and widen their knowledge. An example of a behavioural prevention measure is the recommendation to pregnant women to quit smoking and to participate in a smokers group who desire to quit smoking (Waller, 2002).

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Coill Darach

Coill Darach

Each resident's wellbeing and welfare is maintained by a high standard of evidence- based care and support. Each resident has opportunities to participate in meaningful activities, appropriate to his or her interests and preferences. The arrangements to meet each resident's assessed needs are set out in an individualised personal plan that reflects his /her needs, interests and capacities. Personal plans are drawn up with the maximum participation of each resident. Residents are supported in transition between services and between childhood and adulthood.

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