Information Fluency

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EMPIRE STATE INFORMATION FLUENCY CONTINUUM

EMPIRE STATE INFORMATION FLUENCY CONTINUUM

This document is called an “Information Fluency Continuum” for very specific reasons. Our young people must go beyond being able to decode information to being able to use appropriate information in any situation; they must be “information fluent” in order to thrive both in and out of school. In addition, like literacy, information fluency must extend in a coherent development continuum throughout the years of schooling, K–12 and beyond. Information fluency skills and strategies are an integral part of learning in any subject area. They can be most effectively taught by the librarian in collaboration with the classroom teacher, so that students are using these skills to learn essential content. Some of the skills may be incorporated into classroom instruction; others will be most effectively taught in the library setting. Wherever they are taught, these information fluency skills are pivotal in helping all of our children become independent learners.
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Being fluent and keeping looking

Being fluent and keeping looking

Abstract. The complexities of the many concepts and models around information literacy are considered, and some personal views given as to how they may best be clarified, both theoretically and practically. A slightly adapted idea of the concept of information fluency can serve as a main general purpose for the promotion of information literacy, expressed as a more specific meta-model for the prevailing technological environment, and as still more specific components for a particular context. The focus of this relatively stable general formulation is on understanding, rather than skills or competences. It can incorporate the need for education, advice and counseling, as well as information provision, and with domain-specific literacies, as well as supporting personal information literacy.
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Information literacy training for all staff: a strategic approach

Information literacy training for all staff: a strategic approach

departments requested support immediately after viewing the Research Support Strategy while others still remain unsupported. Many departmental sessions were arranged after library attendance at faculty management meetings where the Research Support Co- ordinator had the opportunity to discuss the importance of information fluency with the academics and contextualise the available support with their departmental priorities. The most effective academic engagement took place when information fluency skills were shown to have clear links with high quality academic research. It was important to demonstrate an understanding of academic activities and to show an awareness of the existing skills of staff while emphasising the importance of information fluency training for the efficient retrieval of current research materials.
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Dennis O Connor EDUCATION

Dennis O Connor EDUCATION

Master Teacher, Online Course Design, Online Instruction, Training Consultant, Technology Integration, Information Fluency Specialist, Search Engine Optimization, Social Network-Marketing, Corporate Training Director, Technical Writer, Education Technology Leadership, Professional Development, HTML, SCORM, Web Authoring Skills, Desktop Publishing, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Writing Instruction and Assessment, NETS Standards Assessment, Course Management Systems (Moodle / D2L / Blackboard / Canvas)

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THE DEGREE QUALIFICATIONS PROFILE: A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING GENERAL EDUCATION

THE DEGREE QUALIFICATIONS PROFILE: A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING GENERAL EDUCATION

LBSU 302 – Information Fluency & Academic Integrity LBSU 300 – Liberal Arts Core Foundation. Disciplinary Skills Requirement[r]

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Being fluent and keeping looking

Being fluent and keeping looking

Abstract. The complexities of the many concepts and models around information literacy are considered, and some personal views given as to how they may best be clarified, both theoretically and practically. A slightly adapted idea of the concept of information fluency can serve as a main general purpose for the promotion of information literacy, expressed as a more specific meta-model for the prevailing technological environment, and as still more specific components for a particular context. The focus of this relatively stable general formulation is on understanding, rather than skills or competences. It can incorporate the need for education, advice and counseling, as well as information provision, and with domain-specific literacies, as well as supporting personal information literacy.
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Oral reading fluency for adults

Oral reading fluency for adults

If a learner reads too slowly, meaning will be lost. Timing a learner’s reading and increasing the speed by restricting the time allowed for reading a particular text aloud is a suggestion from a useful American teaching manual by Susan McShane (2005), which devotes an entire chapter to ‘Reading Fluency’. However this needs to be used with care as not all learners find this a helpful challenge. One of the teachers discovered that timed reading was particularly helpful with one learner and even helped to speed up his subsequent silent reading,

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Fluency detection on communication networks

Fluency detection on communication networks

In this paper, we consider the closely-related task of determining an actor’s fluencies, the set of lan- guages they are capable of speaking and understand- ing. The observed language data will be the same as for LID, but is now considered to indicate a latent property of the actor. This information has a num- ber of downstream uses, such as providing a strong prior on the language of the actor’s future communi- cations, constructing monolingual data sets, and rec- ommending appropriate content for display or fur- ther processing.

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Vol 21, No 2 (2019)

Vol 21, No 2 (2019)

It is of paramount importance to establish that there is no unified convention as to what attitudes are. According to a psychological definition, attitudes are related to the verbal expression of a person eventually turned into behavior (Harris, 2011). There is also the sociological definition where attitudes are a “mental position with regard to a fact or state” and also “a feeling or emotion toward a fact or state” (Attitude, n.d.). These definitions aim to understand learners’ reactions and behaviors during the implementation of information gap activities. In order to learn a foreign language, it is advisable to consider the students’ attitudes to determine and reflect if the tasks would be successful or not. Elder and Iwashita (2005) state that “attitudes towards a task and the conditions under which it is performed might itself have some impact on test performance” (p. 223). The students’ attitudes can be determined through the researcher’s ability to provide a suitable environment and the environment provided by the nature of the information gap activities themselves. Motivations are part of attitudes as they are part of people’s behaviors. Information gap activities can set the environment for motivating spoken interactions (Scrivener, 2011). Oxford (2001) states that “negative attitudes and beliefs can reduce learners’ motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse” (p. 168).
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Douglas E. Cross, Ph.D Associate Professor, Speech Science/Speech-Language Pathology Curriculum Vita

Douglas E. Cross, Ph.D Associate Professor, Speech Science/Speech-Language Pathology Curriculum Vita

Supplemental Materials . A two hundred and fourteen page text of information, drawings, graphs, figures, and other materials pertinent to the evaluation and diagnosis of speech and language disorders. This text was compiled as a supplemental text for graduate and undergraduate courses in diagnosis of speech-language disorders.

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The evolution of motor creativity during primary education

The evolution of motor creativity during primary education

On the whole, motor creativity appears to increase between the ages of 6 and 12 years. However, different aspects or measures of creativity exhibit different developmental patterns. Overall motor fluency (the number of different solutions found in a task) increases most markedly between Level 1 (6-8 years) and Level 2 (8-10 years), while overall flexibility (the number of different types of solution) increases more steadily, and originality and imagination show no statistically significant changes. In addition to these trends, creativity scores also depend on the kind of task performed. In a manipulation task ("What can you do with a hoop?"), fluency, flexibility and originality tend to peak in Level 2, while in a symbolism task ("What else can you do with a gym rod?") they all rise very little before Level 2 and markedly thereafter, as does imagination (capacity for representation: "Can you move like a ......?"). It may be relevant that this improvement in symbolic and imaginative performance coincides with the commencement of the formal operational stage.
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EDUCATION OF EUROPEAN FLUENCY SPECIALISTS The European Clinical Specialization on Fluency Disorders (ECSF)

EDUCATION OF EUROPEAN FLUENCY SPECIALISTS The European Clinical Specialization on Fluency Disorders (ECSF)

The stated goals of the ECSF project were: (a) to harmonize fluency courses in curricula of the partners, with individual differences recognized; and (b) the development of a one-year clinical specialization course. The main focus for both goals was on unifying stated learning outcomes: knowledge, skills and competencies acquired by students. All participating departments jointly developed an undergraduate course on fluency disorders with a minimum of 5 ECTS and implemented this into their regular curricula. Although didactical approaches differ between institutes, all use the same learning outcomes and competencies. A joint e-learning platform was installed where students from all
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Feature Selection for Fluency Ranking

Feature Selection for Fluency Ranking

Feature selection can be seen as model selection, where the best model of all models that can be formed using a set of features should be selected. Madigan and Raftery (1994) propose an method for model selection aptly named Occam’s window. This method excludes models that do not perform com- petitively to other models or that do not perform bet- ter than one of its submodels. Although this method is conceptually firm, it is nearly infeasable to apply it with the number of features used in fluency rank- ing. Berger et al. (1996) propose a selection method that iteratively builds a maximum entropy model, adding features that improve the model. We modify this method for ranking tasks in section 2.5. Ratna- parkhi (1999) uses a simple frequency-based cutoff, where features that occur infrequently are excluded. We discuss a variant of this selection criterium in section 2.3. Perkins et al. (2003) describe an ap- proach where feature selection is applied as a part of model parameter estimation. They rely on the fact that ` 1 regularizers have a tendency to force a
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Paper presented at American Educational Research Association conference, April 2009

Paper presented at American Educational Research Association conference, April 2009

As stated above, a focus on ICT fluency is important for two reasons: 1) learning and working in all disciplines now requires the capacity to think critically and creatively with technology, and 2) skill-focused education has not engaged US students in a sustained way, as shown by declining interest in IT careers. In this paper, we have begun to describe how middle school students are engaging with technologies in out-of-school settings, and strategies for assessing what they are learning. We have reported that there are many different technology tools being used and mastered by middle school students across the U.S.. In addition, we have taken a variant of one of the computer programming tools (Storytelling Alice is an extension of Alice) and described how we assessed the ICT fundamental concepts in middle school students’ games, and what we learned by coding the games.
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Reading Fluency Techniques from the Bottom-up:  A Grounded Theory

Reading Fluency Techniques from the Bottom-up: A Grounded Theory

Since the study aimed at theorizing practitioners perspectives concerning techniques of reading fluency, we began the interview with a very general question to elicit information on the techniques they use to develop learners’ reading fluency. In line with the principles of grounded theory, the interviews were all audio-recorded to be transcribed verbatim and meticulously analyzed soon after the interviews through open coding, axial coding and selective coding. The total time for interviewing each one of the participants averaged 20 minutes, with a minimum of 10 minutes and a maximum of 35 minutes. In line with the ethics of qualitative research, participants’ real names were not identified in the final report of the findings.
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Mini-Lessons for FLUENCY

Mini-Lessons for FLUENCY

Teacher Directed/Silent Readings: SSR encourages students to practice reading self-selected materials. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for students to develop fluency, expand their vocabulary and comprehension abilities, develop broader knowledge of written language, and provide powerful source for world knowledge.

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Is classroom noise always bad for children? The contribution of age and selective attention to creative performance in noise

Is classroom noise always bad for children? The contribution of age and selective attention to creative performance in noise

To provide a clear account of the available evidence, we need to clarify the meaning of two cognitive processes: working memory and selective attention. Both skills are considered “executive functions” (EF), allowing us “to concentrate and pay attention, when going on automatic or relying on instinct or intuition would be ill-advised, insufficient, or impossible” (Diamond, 2013, p. 135). Working memory is the ability to both store and manipulate information that is no longer perceptually present. Selective attention represents resistance to external distractors, and is an aspect of inhibitory control (Miyake et al., 2000; Diamond, 2013). Sörqvist et al. (2010) tested how working memory mediates the impact of speech noise on adults’ reading comprehension. Their working memory test involved having participants identify and remember the three smallest numbers in a list. Overall, noise negatively impacted reading comprehension. Note that the noise in this experiment consisted of hearing someone telling a story (i.e., noise likely to evoke more semantic and phonological processing than mixed, multi-talker noise), which could explain the negative effect on the reading task. Notably though, participants with lower working memory skills were susceptible to greater interference from noise. Analyzing the different components of the working memory task, the authors noted that the mediation effect was mainly explained by the ability to suppress irrelevant numbers immediately from memory. Careful analyses of different EF components showed that it was selective attention, rather than working memory, which was the key factor. Other studies provided further evidence of this: a working memory measure, which did not require inhibiting previous mental representations, did not mediate the effect of speech on serial recall (Elliott and Briganti, 2012) or on reading comprehension (Sörqvist, 2010).
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Assessment of Teachers - Pupils’ Perceptions on Use of Digital Images in Teaching Reading Fluency Skills in Sokoto Metropolis

Assessment of Teachers - Pupils’ Perceptions on Use of Digital Images in Teaching Reading Fluency Skills in Sokoto Metropolis

The study employed Mixed design research method were questionnaires and tests were administered only to both teachers and pupils of experimental group, while the control group were only exposed to academic performance test before and after the treatment. The population of the study are the experimental group only that consist of four English language teachers and 88 primary three pupils from four randomly selected primary schools using Microsoft Random numbers. Two structured questionnaires were used for data collection - one questionnaire each for both the teachers and the pupils. The pupils were asked ten questions, and the questionnaire employed two scale responses of „yes‟ or „no‟ purposely to make the inquiry very simple and precise for the participants considering their educational level (primary three pupils). While the teacher‟s questionnaires consist of only six question to measure their view on the use of digital pictures in teaching reading fluency to primary three pupils in the study area. Descriptive statistics in form of frequency and mean were employed to answer the research questions. In this respect an item scoring a mean ≥ 90.00 was considered as significant, while any item scoring a mean < 90.00 was considered insignificant. The treatment was composed of five Guided passages illustrated with digital pictures. Each session of the treatment lasted for 30 minutes four times a week for five weeks.
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Oral reading fluency in adults

Oral reading fluency in adults

encouraged to try out a range of methods and materials, and to report back briefly after each class on what they had done. All the suggested methods, except for reading along with audio books, were tried. At the second team meeting, the teachers’ initial reactions to the strategy were noted and incorporated into guidelines on using oral reading fluency. They noted early on that: • When the principles were explained the

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Reading Fluency: How does it develop and how can we improve it in children with reading disabilities?

Reading Fluency: How does it develop and how can we improve it in children with reading disabilities?

small group instruction can bring their skills in phonemic decoding, ing, text reading accuracy, and reading comprehension solidly into th text reading accuracy, and reading comprehension solidly into the e average range. Although the gap in reading fluency can be closed average range. Although the gap in reading fluency can be closed somewhat, reading fluency is likely to remain substantially impa

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