Information Literacy

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Playful Information Literacy: Play and information Literacy in Higher Education

Playful Information Literacy: Play and information Literacy in Higher Education

A large and significant category of library games are those associated with induction, or orientation to the library, rather than addressing those skills primarily thought of as information literacy skills. They are often treasure hunt style activities and are the largest category of game like activities that sit on the more openly playful end of the open / structured pla y spectrum. Games such as these (Piatt, 2009; Thompson, Kardos, & Knapp, 2008), use playful elements that give participants permission to play in the library and university spaces. They demarcate a safe, magic circle (Salen & Zimmerman, 2004, p. 94-96), in which normal life does not apply. When learners engage in these activities, they step outside of the potentially intimidating and serious library space, and into the safe play space. This enables them to feel safe to explore, to experience the library in a way the otherwise may not. They can go beyond the tasks directly set in the activity as long as they are within its bounds and form their own ideas and construct their own knowledge in a safe environment. The activity itself changes the user perceptions of the environment and is placed at the more playful, less structured end of the game spectrum. Search skills are often a focus of library games, but tend to concentrate on lower level aspects of search and information literacies. Topics such as Boolean operators, use of the library catalogue, or accessing particular library databases abound. The need to formalise rigid rules when
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Three Theoretical Perspectives on Information Literacy

Three Theoretical Perspectives on Information Literacy

We regularly devote ourselves to a range of activities in order to main- tain social contacts, carry out work tasks or errands in everyday life. We blog, google, tweet, or search for books in library catalogues and data- bases, etc. It is impossible to imagine these activities without the tools linked to them. The inseparable relation between action, physical as well as linguistic, and tool is central in a sociocultural perspective (Säljö 1999) on information seeking and learning information literacy. When we want to seek information Google offers us a sophisticated tool through which we are able to reach and use sources in a manner that we could not have dreamed of only 15 years ago. Today, with the prevalence of social media like Facebook, Twitter or blogs, and myriads of various other networked tools we are able to keep ourselves updated in ways difficult to imagine before these tools were conceived. At the same time, it is impor- tant to remember that a sociocultural perspective implies that tools also bear limitations (ibid.). The functions of search engines and social net- working tools influence our possibilities for action through offering us both resources and restrictions; as information seekers we are at the mercy of Google’s individualised ranking of search hits. Likewise, we are depen- dent on the functionalities offered by Facebook or Twitter. In a similar way, the language tools available within a scientific discipline shape – to a degree – what can be thought, said or written.
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Information literacy education in US libraries

Information literacy education in US libraries

On a more social note, we were also looking forward to visiting our friend and fellow librarian, Jacqui Weetman Dacosta, who moved to the United States a few years ago. Jacqui now works as the Information Literacy Librarian at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), and serves as the international representative on the CSG-Information Literacy Group.

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Information Literacy and RSS feeds at LSE

Information Literacy and RSS feeds at LSE

RSS, as well as providing a valuable solution to enhancing training provision at LSE, is arguably another tool along with search engines, that can be hugely valuable to those with well developed information literacy skills. In Autumn 2006 LSE offered a new course for staff that focused on finding and reading blogs and using an RSS reader. The course was taught by staff in the Centre for Learning Technology and explaining clearly how RSS works was a key task for the trainers. Unsurprisingly, grappling with this new way of reading the web was challenging for many attending the course. In Autumn 2007 library staff and learning technologists will work together to develop a new course for PhD students and researchers on utilising RSS to keep up to date. This course is partly as a reaction to the increasing number of publishers and library systems that have added RSS functionality into their databases. Librarians and trainers elsewhere may also find themselves having to teach users about RSS, and how to identify and use feeds. It is difficult to predict how RSS technologies will develop; for some researchers already, checking their feed reader can be as important as checking their e-mail account. In fact, it is even possible to check your e-mail using RSS technology. However as technology develops it is clear that teaching people to navigate the web and to find the information is a skill that constantly needs updating to take into account new tools and technologies. RSS is currently an important tool that trainers can use, but one which requires support if our users are to exploit it fully.
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The revised CILIP definition of information literacy

The revised CILIP definition of information literacy

The final part of the definition discusses the role of information professionals across all sectors in supporting and developing information literacy; from school and public librarians to those in health or other workplace settings. It also recognises the need for education and professional development for librarians to equip them with the skills they need to support or teach information literacy. The ILG see contributing to the education and professional development of the profession as one of their key objectives.

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Information literacy and public libraries in India

Information literacy and public libraries in India

After Independence, India has experienced growing population of literate and educated citizens due to various efforts in universalisation of elementary education through programmes like, Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA), District Primary Education Programme (DPEP), National Literacy Mission and so on. On the other hand, for the facilitating educated citizens with the adequate documentary and knowledge resources, government and other agencies have established public libraries. The community information centres and village knowledge centres are the recent additions to this effort that would transform India into an information society, where information and knowledge resources are considered as critical ingredient for development. But problem is with the effective and efficient use, consumption and evaluation of information resources, so that informed citizen can take right decisions. Here information literacy can play a vital role in educating the users of libraries on various information and documentary resources, where to start searching of information, what where and how to access them, how to assess and compare retrieved information, how to communicate their information or findings to the general masses and experts, and so on. In addition to borrow books for entertainment and leisure, public libraries can also disseminate information on community development, best practices, literature, culture, trade, education, etc. which may be further elaborated when needs arise. Information seekers may want consolidated or exhaustive information. To provide right information to the users, public librarians should be trained to develop information literacy competency and should able to educate the user that will make user information literate.
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Trends on information literacy and LILAC 2011

Trends on information literacy and LILAC 2011

5. Are IL standards constructive and useful tools or not? This year’s LILAC provided a fertile ground for discussions on whether IL models and frameworks are useful tools and whether we should employ them in our IL practice. In my view, the consensus was that standards need to be seen as tools and as such they provide a common language among practitioners, initiate discussions, and describe what Information Literacy is, as long as they are fully contextualised in people’s experiences and realities. The support for these standards is shown by the fact that, during this year’s LILAC, the revised model of SCONUL’s Seven Pillars was launched, and at least two international presenters showed their models for embedding IL in an academic context (New Zealand and Singapore) (Wang, 2011;Chia, 2011). However, as Whitworth stressed during this debate, the purpose of these standards is to respond to change and practice, rather than to follow them rigidly and turn them into a “tick-the-boxes approach” (Whitworth 2011).
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BILI: Building Information Literacy in Ireland

BILI: Building Information Literacy in Ireland

As early as 1876, Otis Robinson noted that “all that is taught in college amounts to very little, but if we can send students out self-reliant in their investigations, we will have accomplished much” (Abromeit & Vaughan, 2004). IL terminology and pedagogy may have evolved, but the core importance of independent, lifelong learning has remained constant. In 2006, the Library Association of Ireland (LAI) formed the Working Group on Information Literacy (WGIL) to consider how to support IL development in Ireland. Their report, Review of Cross-sector Activity 2006 to 2008 and Initial Recommendations for Further Action, provided the first national, cross-sector review of Irish practice (O‟Brien & Russell, 2012). WGIL was succeeded by the Task Force on Information Literacy (TFIL) which sought to implement WGIL‟s recommendations. Aiming to help inform TFIL‟s actions, our research had three main objectives:
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Editorial: Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning

Editorial: Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning

collaborative nature of the process. Information literacy has a key role in the skills development agenda and in combating social deprivation and disadvantage which moves it a long way from the earlier view of information literacy, deriving mainly from higher education, which saw information literacy skills development as primarily an individual activity focusing around print and online sources. To understand information literacy today we have to include not only the evaluation and use of traditional “library” sources but also social policy issues, relating to the relief of inequality and disadvantage, skills development for a post-industrial society, critical thinking and lifelong learning, an activity which information literacy informs and supports. There is also the issue of digital literacy, school and higher education curricula, early years learning, health issues, the dynamics of the workplace and learning and teaching skills and strategies which place an
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A Strategic Approach to Curriculum Design for Information Literacy in Teacher Education – Implementing an Information Literacy Conceptual Framework

A Strategic Approach to Curriculum Design for Information Literacy in Teacher Education – Implementing an Information Literacy Conceptual Framework

It is important to note, that although the element of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) features quite prominently as a capability required in teacher education and education in general, and currently has significant impact on and within the information landscape, it does not form part of our definition for being information literate. ICT can be seen as a specific context for information with its own set of capabilities that are required to engage with information. Our underpinning philosophy identifies information literacy, not information technology, as the principle element and focus in the shift towards a lifelong learning educational paradigm (Bundy, 2003). Therefore we deliberately chose to remove all context, including that of ICT, surrounding IL and have based our definition of IL on its basic fundamental principles. We do recognise, however, that developing ICT skills is becoming an essential attribute for learners to engage with information that is accessed through
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Integrating information literacy in Dutch language education : developing learning materials for information literacy in primary education

Integrating information literacy in Dutch language education : developing learning materials for information literacy in primary education

17 certain phases of the process that appeared to be difficult for students, for example during the instruction of the lesson. Therefore, it is recommended to spend sufficient time on the introduction of the lesson. In order to make the process of information literacy successful, it is essential that students have a certain level of prior knowledge with regard to the information literacy process, as well as some knowledge about subject matter contents, before they actually start with the assignment (Brand-Gruwel & Walhout, 2010). This is necessary to integrate the new obtained knowledge with the prior knowledge of the student (Walraven et al., 2008), which could also affect the likelihood of a successful transfer (Brand-Gruwel & Walhout, 2010). In the introduction section attention could be paid to jointly construct a mental model, which can be achieved by discussing the core concept and connecting it to other related concepts. This process is primarily aimed at helping students with lower levels of prior knowledge, because it is a way to clarify the meaning of the concept. A way to develop such a mental model is by designing a mindmap (Brand-Gruwel & Walhout, 2010), which is a way to visualize the mental model, and therefore make it more concrete. A final way of teacher guidance could be provided by modelling parts of the task (Brand-Gruwel & Walhout, 2010). This form of guidance entails that the teacher shows certain steps of the process, while thinking aloud. For example, modelling the process of estimating the quality and reliability of digital sources. In all cases, the guidance that students receive from the teachers should decrease as the students obtain more knowledge and skills (Brand-Gruwel and Walhout, 2010).
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Food logging: an information literacy perspective

Food logging: an information literacy perspective

There have been many studies and reviews of food logging apps and their effectiveness from a (mobile) health information perspective (Azar et al., 2013; Bert et al., 2014; Klasnja and Pratt, 2012; Rusin et al., 2013; Stumbo, 2013), and studies that have looked at information literacy in relation to health (Lloyd et al., 2014; Yates et al., 2009, 2012) and healthy eating (e.g. Marshall et al., 2009, 2012; Niedzwiedzka et al., 2014). However to date there have been no studies examining the nature of information literacy in the use of mobile apps to monitor diet. The central aim of the paper is uncover what it means to be information literate in the landscape of food logging. In asking this question the research reflects a turn in thinking about information literacy away from purely educational settings, to recognising the multiple and complex aspects of information use across the life course (Lloyd, 2006) and in everyday life contexts (Lloyd, 2010b; Yates et al., 2009; Yates,
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Information literacy skills of engineering students

Information literacy skills of engineering students

The respondents in the study were diploma-level engineering students who had undergone at least three semesters at a Malaysian college. Data were collected using a survey instrument adapted from Mittermeyer and triangulated using a citation analysis of student bibliographies in an essay assignment. The results of this study show that the respondents seriously lacked the necessary knowledge and skills to evaluate internet information, to identify the most efficient search strategy, to use scholarly resources, and to use information ethically. Most scholarly resources used were books in print format, while most non-scholarly resources referred to were in electronic format. This study implies the importance of information literacy assessment as the first step in improving students’ information skills. It also indicates the need to encourage students to use more scholarly electronic resources in their coursework. It is suggested that a larger sample of students be used in order to be more representative of the engineering student population. An intervention program should also be introduced to improve students’ information literacy skills. Keywords: Assessment; Information literacy skills; Engineering students; Citation analysis
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Measuring the impact of an information literacy session

Measuring the impact of an information literacy session

therefore to be able to measure learning, we would at least change the example word Inclus*. Also for consideration in a further study some questions that tested particular skills, rather than confidence or use-levels, would enable us to measure improvements in information literacy abilities more directly. For example, as part of a study to assess the information literacy skills of undergraduate students in Quebec universities (Mittermeyer and Quirion 2003, 39) used this question (amongst others): In order to find more documents on your topic you can include synonyms in your search statement. To combine those synonyms in your statement, you should use:
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Information literacy : a neglected essential learning

Information literacy : a neglected essential learning

Finally, the research questions will be outlined and description provided regarding how they will guide research into the investigation into the hypothesis that: information literacy is [r]

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Closing the gaps: Maori and information literacy

Closing the gaps: Maori and information literacy

This paper focuses on the reasons why information literacy is a concept that has yet to make an impact on Maori. Although Maori participation as librarians and library users has increased dramatically over the last decade there are still a range of barriers that continue to inhibit access to library and information services for Maori. The relevance of these barriers to the 'information literacy divide' are analysed and actions are identified which will allow a strategy to be created to close the gap.

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Developing a New Curriculum for Information Literacy

Developing a New Curriculum for Information Literacy

From May until July 2011 we were seconded to the Arcadia Programme at Cambridge University as research fellows, with a remit to create a new and innovative curriculum for teaching information literacy in higher education. We had ten weeks in which to research and develop a practical structure that would comprehensively meet the ongoing

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The Journal of Information Literacy: A Bibliometric Study

The Journal of Information Literacy: A Bibliometric Study

The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is an international, peer-reviewed journal, published by Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) Information Literacy Group, United Kingdom since 2007 (http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL). It aims to look into information literacy in all its forms to deal with the interests of various Information Literacy (IL) communities of practice. To this end it publishes articles, book reviews, research studies, conference papers, etc. both from established and new authors in this field all around the world.
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REDEFINING INFORMATION LITERACY IN INDIAN CONTEXT

REDEFINING INFORMATION LITERACY IN INDIAN CONTEXT

Burchinal (1976) redefined information literacy in terms of skills for locating and using information for problem solving and decision making. Hemlink (1976), a consultant for mass communication research linked information literacy with public media. Owens (1976) linked Information literacy with the active citizenship (Owens, 1976). In 1979, Information Industry Association defined information literacy contradicting with Zurkowski‟s linkage of information literacy with workplace. Garfield quoted this definition as, information literate is the person who knows the techniques and skills for using information tools in molding solutions to problems (Garfield, 2001:210). Taylor linked the library profession with information literacy, and noted that the concept suggested that many problems could be solved through the use of information, that knowledge of information resources is necessary, and that there are strategies for the acquisition of information (Taylor,
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Information Literacy and Sustainable Development

Information Literacy and Sustainable Development

In accordance with the stated global goals, it is expected that by 2030, all men and women, the poor and the vulnerable should be able to have equal rights to economic resources as well as basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, financial services and microfinance. Having rights to the above would depend on the amount of access to necessary and vital information. This type of information could not be supplied only through traditional literacy hence, the need for information literacy. This view is supported by Information Federation of Library Association (IFLA) that “increase access to information and knowledge, underpinned by universal literacy is an essential pillar of sustainable development” (IFLA, 2018). To make access to vital information easy, information literacy must be encouraged through e-library in order to provide and increase digital literacy. There has been various programmes through e-library which offer instruction in basic computer skills and guidance on accessing information through the internet and to gather a wide variety of knowledge which could help in sustainability.
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