Integration of Faith and Learning

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Answering Objections to the Integration of Faith and Learning at Christian Colleges

Answering Objections to the Integration of Faith and Learning at Christian Colleges

“religious perspective” is true, but that all religious perspectives are equally false (or to be postmodern, equally “true”). Part of the problem is the use of the term perspective, which is sometimes taken to mean a subjective viewpoint rather than a knowledge claim. Those of us arguing for the integration of Christian faith (read, Christian knowledge) and learning believe that Christianity brings not just a viewpoint but objective knowledge to the table that must be incorporated into the world of learning in order for that world to be complete, accurate, and fully true. As a worldview, Christianity does make an exclusive truth claim over other religions (just as many of those religions do). A Christian college should have the courage of its convictions.
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Christians in Strategic Leadership: Towards an Integration of Faith and the Top Management Team

Christians in Strategic Leadership: Towards an Integration of Faith and the Top Management Team

Strategic leadership theory finds its roots in the “upper echelons” theory. Upper echelon theory encouraged theoretical and empirical research into the impact top executive teams had upon organizational outcomes (if any), as well the role of symbolism and social construction in top executive influence (Hambrick & Pettigrew, 2001; Vera & Crossan, 2004). Other studies focused on issues such as strategic decision-making (Amason, 1996; Hitt & Tyler, 1991), TMT demography (Smith, Smith, Olian, Sims, O‟Bannon, & Scully, 1994; Wiersema & Bantel, 1992; Barsade, Ward, Turner, & Sonnenfeld, 2000), TMT heterogeneity (Bantel & Jackson, 1989; Michel and Hambrick, 1992), and TMT influence on organizational learning (Vera & Crossan 2004), as well as numerous other topics. 2
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Exploring Selected Online and Face-to-Face Course Inclusion of Faith Integration in a Business Administration Program

Exploring Selected Online and Face-to-Face Course Inclusion of Faith Integration in a Business Administration Program

opportunity as those in the face-to-face coursework (Essex, 2007; Salmon & Nie, 2008). Similarly, learning communities allow students to discuss and learn from one another by dialoguing faith topics, which gives students the feeling of involvement and belonging (Ryman, Hardham, Richardson, & Ross, 2009). Additionally, prayer warriors are a community of believers who connect, grow, and minister through the power of prayer and are a powerful faith integration tool (prayerwarriors.org, 2012). In fact, Kemp (2010) suggested that colleges and universities should integrate prayer warriors so students are held accountable for their faith development throughout a semester by discussion board submissions due each week. In addition, Bible scripture should be incorporated into both face-to-face and online business administration courses. These tools can provide faculty the opportunity to provide the same faith integration into online courses as they do into the face-to-face courses.
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Integration of Islamic Values in Learning

Integration of Islamic Values in Learning

The verse is a picture that humans are intelligent beings who are given the ability to think, research and take advantage of the contents and natural events, and with a healthy mindset for humans can foster the belief that what is in nature is all God's creation. So the more that is known should be able to encourage the higher the level of faith and devotion to Allah. In other words, the integration of remembrance in thinking is the teachings of Islam that can lead to people who believe in Allah. That those who think and remembrance are those who remember Allah when standing, sitting or lying down, those who are not separated from Allah from his memory. Meanwhile, other interpreters explain ulul albab are people who want to use their minds to take advantage of him, seek guidance from him, describe the majesty of God and want to remember the wisdom of reason and virtue, in addition to the power of His gifts in all their attitudes and actions. (Ahmad Muthofa Al Maraghi, Tafsir Al Maraghi: 290).
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Faith & Learning - Valparaiso University

Faith & Learning - Valparaiso University

Valparaiso University offers a vibrant and rich religious life on campus through the pastors and staff of the Chapel of the Resurrection as well as through numerous faith-based organizations and activities. The Valparaiso community also provides a multitude of Christian congregations that serve as additional resources for enriching the spiritual lives of students, new-comers and visitors.

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faith formation and sacramental preparation for people with learning disabilities Diana Klein in collaboration with

faith formation and sacramental preparation for people with learning disabilities Diana Klein in collaboration with

The author, Diana Klein, has worked in the area of catechesis and pastoral theology as a catechist, catechetical adviser, lecturer, writer and editor. The book was developed and trialled in collaboration with St Joseph’s Pastoral Centre whose principal aim is to support families who embrace members with learning disabilities in parishes.

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Learning Source Descriptions for Data Integration

Learning Source Descriptions for Data Integration

Suppose we have a source realestate.com, for which we pro- vide the source description manually. Specifically, suppose the source contains the elements house location, listed price, and agent phone (Figure 1), and the mapping specifies that these elements match the elements house address, price, and contact phone of the mediated schema, respectively. There are several things that a machine learning program can glean from such a mapping. First, if it looks at the data in the source, it now has many examples of home addresses, home prices and phone numbers, and it can therefore cre- ate recognizers for these elements. Second, the system can learn by looking at the names of the elements. For exam- ple, knowing that source element agent phone matches con- tact phone, it may hypothesize that the word “agent” (as well as “phone”) in an element name is indicative of that el- ement being contact phone. The system can also learn from the properties of the data. For example, small numbers tend to indicate numbers of rooms, not prices of houses. As an- other example, when the phone numbers of a given element have significant commonalities, the phone numbers are more likely to be the office phones of employees, rather than home phones. Finally, the program can learn from the proximity of elements. For example, in the real-estate domain it often happens that a long text field at the beginning of the house entry is the house description, or that agent phones tend to appear next to the name of the real-estate agency.
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Multisensory Associative Learning and Multisensory Integration

Multisensory Associative Learning and Multisensory Integration

indicate that prior learned associations may be playing a role in how sensory information is integrated. As the present study finds, top-down influences such as associative learning thus seem to be related to subadditive violations of the additive rule, which could reflect more efficient processing. A possible explanation for why only subadditivity was observed could be attributed to the salience of the choice of stimuli. The present study was comprised of bimodal stimuli presented at very high effectiveness, which could be responsible for activating a certain type of multisensory neuron, which have a high dynamic range and fire in an increasingly subadditive manner as stimulus effectiveness grows (Cappe et al., 2010; Perrault et al., 2003, 2005). Furthermore, if near-ceiling effects are observed as a result of the high-salience stimuli, subadditive effects may be representative of more efficient processing as a result of the reweighting between sensory features, or rather of top-down influences such as attention (Werner & Noppeney, 2010) or, crucially, learned associations.
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Bad Faith or No Faith? Finding a Place for Wrongful Refusal to Defend in Florida's Bad Faith Jurisprudence

Bad Faith or No Faith? Finding a Place for Wrongful Refusal to Defend in Florida's Bad Faith Jurisprudence

tionale set out above could be applied to refusal-to-defend cases where there is a judgment for less than the limits of the policy that is ultimately satisfied by the insurer. Yet the insured whose insurer re- fuses to settle does not suffer the expense and anguish of litigation that burdens the victim of a wrongful refusal to defend. Indeed, it is undoubtedly true in at least some cases that the insured is forced to judgment or settlement for the very reason that the insurer breached its duty to defend in bad faith. If bad faith refusal to defend is predi- cated on the insurer’s breach of the Covenant, then the breach and its result are identical to an excess judgment scenario except for the presence of the excess judgment. In other words, the conduct that amounts to bad faith and theoretically should warrant bad faith remedies is present regardless of whether the insured faces the addi- tional burden of an excess judgment. The excess judgment, in fact, is a wholly separate matter that does not itself indicate the presence of bad faith because an excess can occur where the insurer rightfully re- fused to defend. In these circumstances, the insured has faced conse- quences of the insurer’s breach that are not present in the refusal-to- settle context, and the excess judgment serves merely as a measure of monetary losses rather than a predicate to bad faith liability. The harm to the insured does not lie only in the excess judgment. Indeed, the harm is done at the very inception of litigation, and its conse- quences include all of the events leading up to the excess judgment. It makes little sense to demand an excess judgment as proof of bad faith where the harm lies in the nature and severity of the insurer’s breach, a matter that could in theory be demonstrated even before judgment in the underlying action. Without engaging in an exhaus- tive analysis, then, the existence of an excess judgment should prove irrelevant to whether a cause of action exists for bad faith refusal to defend predicated on breach of the Covenant, though the excess judgment is clearly some measure of damages.
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Bankrupting the Faith

Bankrupting the Faith

The results of this study demonstrate that religious organizations, viewed as a group, enter Chapter 11 with specific assets and reorganization prospects that can make the process valuable to them and their creditors. These effectively small businesses exhibit similar organizational focus on a single leader or group of leaders as other small entrepreneurships. However, by the time they arrive in bankruptcy court they have operated longer and have accumulated more assets that are more specific to their operations than the typical small business debtor. As with other small business debtors, bank- ruptcy courts need to focus their attention on the leader’s ability to marshal his organization through the turmoil that led it to bankruptcy when assessing the debtor’s ability to reorganize, possibly more so than they need to in regard to the operators of large companies that file under Chapter 11. Nonetheless, also focusing on the deployment and value of the assets owned by the corpo- rate entity is crucial. Moreover, the members of the religious organization themselves have the ability to revitalize a failing congregation, provided that they can find an acceptable leader or renew each other’s faith in the pastor. Thus where an entrepreneur may fail for lack of a workable business model or customers, a religious organization may succeed with the help of reorgani- zation essentially because of its customers – that is, its members – and their commitment to sustaining their religious community in the building in which the congregation has gathered for many years.
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Integration of eportfolios in Learning Management Systems

Integration of eportfolios in Learning Management Systems

In recent years, eLearning has assumed an important role in schools and companies. The main objective of this educational model is to enhance the teaching/learning process by using the Internet for delivering educational activities. Learning Management Systems (LMS) are specialized systems developed for managing these educational activities, which include the distribution of educational content, the synchronous and asynchronous communication with students and the assessment of students’ skills based on assignments and tests. Nevertheless, in order to provide a positive learning experience the LMS must be effectively integrated with other specialized systems typically found in an educational environment such as Repositories of Learning Objects or ePortfolio Systems.
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Technology Integration and Student Learning Motivation

Technology Integration and Student Learning Motivation

surveyed, want teachers to use teaching strategies that involve technology. Twenty-five students wanted the “fun factor,” 15 wanted teachers to use more teacher support to help them learn, seven students thought teachers should use groups or participation practices more, and six students had responses that made no sense. Sample responses can be seen in Appendix D. The most significant data analysis from the initial Motivation Survey revealed that students already had a high level for motivation and they valued technology in their learning experience. Despite the various categories that the open ended questions were put into, a
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Integration of Local Wisdom in Arabic Learning

Integration of Local Wisdom in Arabic Learning

During this time Arabic learning materials related to istima, kalam, qiroah, and kitabah still describe vocabulary that only exists in Middle Eastern countries, such as camels, deserts, wheat and so on. For those who have never seen and heard this vocabulary for the first time, they certainly feel strange, so that it requires deeper treatment to give understanding to students. In providing this understanding, educators must associate the object with similar objects found in Indonesia, such as linking the word camel to chicken, desert to the island, and the same type of wheat with rice. Likewise in discussing activities and places carried out by foreign people, it would be more effective and efficient to explain the vocabulary about the daily activities of students and the places they often see and meet. Things like this are also expected to be found in local wisdom-based learning. To realize Arabic language learning based on local wisdom, the foreign vocabulary contained in the material should be directed to 11 Amporn Sa-ngiamwibool, “Raising Learner Awareness Of Local Wisdom In Tour-Related
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The Lens of Faith

The Lens of Faith

Those who confess religious faith do not and cannot know God in this same way. God is not measurable because God transcends the physical universe, outside of the measuring range of scientific instruments. The truths of faith are not scientific truths. What cannot be measured by science cannot be verified as scientific fact. Scientific belief and religious faith are two different ways of knowing, and because of that, science cannot directly prove God’s existence nor, however, can it disprove it. God is not measurable therefore not an object of scientific study, provisional or otherwise.
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What is Faith?

What is Faith?

Faith, like religion, is not impossible to define, but somewhat difficult to group into a single fixed description. There are no laws that require a person or a group of people to have faith; therefore faith comes from our own personal choices and happenings in life. Based on my own experiences in life so far, faith has been a pivotal part when it comes to my outlook on life and my trust in others as well as in myself. Faith also plays a leading role when it comes to my sister, Idia. Having a family member with a mental disability undeniably creates numerous challenges in life, but faith makes it somewhat more manageable and easier to be hopeful about the future.
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Faith and Ultimatum

Faith and Ultimatum

Youth had a way of blurring the edges. When I elected in 1964 to participate in the first year of voluntary busing to achieve school integration in Seattle, it was having the choice to go to Cleveland rather than Garfield, my neighborhood school, that inspired me. How cool, I thought, to go to a school so far away, one that my cousins attended. One that, at the time, was on the border of Seattle’s still semirural communities of Georgetown and South Park, which fanned out into clusters of small truck farms. The kids at Cleveland were mostly Asians from Beacon Hill and poor whites from the rural areas.
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The Doctrines Of The Faith

The Doctrines Of The Faith

Inspiration is that inexplicable working of the Holy Spirit whereby He guided the human authors of the Bible in choosing the very words (verbal) they used in writing every portion (ple- nary) of the original manuscripts so that the Bible is, in all its parts, both infalliable, as to truth, and final, as to authority. The guidance of the human authors by the Holy Spirit was such that He used their own individual personalities to record without error God’s revelation which is to be the only authoritative source for man’s faith and practice (cf. Matthew 5:17-18, 24:35; Luke 21:15; John 5:39, 10:35; 1 Corinthians 2:10-13; 2 Timothy 3:16, 2 Peter 1:21, Exodus 4:10-15; 2 Samuel 23:2; Isaiah 8:1, Jeremiah 1:9, 30:2, 32:2; 1 Corinthians 11:23; 14:37, 1 Thessalonians 2:13, Galatians 1:11,12; Hebrews 1:1,2; Revelation 1:11, Genesis 1:26, Exodus 4:12; Isaiah 51:16; Ezekiel 1:3; Revelation 14:13; Hebrews 6:18; Titus 1:2).
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EU integration in the (post)-migrant-crisis context : learning new integration modes?

EU integration in the (post)-migrant-crisis context : learning new integration modes?

(e.g. Heiskala and Aro 2018; Antoniolli 2019). An original aspect of our findings here is on the prospects of enlargement. While widening through further enlargement is still debated, it has been put on hold for the foreseeable future because of the problems that arose with the current MSs. Attention is now on coordinating the relationships with the candidate countries rather than on affirming membership. As to deepening, some scholars, such as Heiskala and Aro (2018), still use the term when they refer to how the EU regulates relationships among its MSs. However, our findings about the emerging preference for differentiated integration suggest that may no longer express the prospects of the relation between the EU and its MSs. Other than with regard to securitisation, the differentiated integration trajectory that our findings point to may offer a more realistic image of cooperation among different groups of MSs. Particularly important here is that the widening and deepening terminology does not seem to capture the new integration mode evidenced by the shaping of the relationship between the EU and its exiting MS the UK. Choices as to the retained level of integration in this respect are driven by a tension between the objective of reaching a mutually beneficial deal and the objective of giving a clear message to other MSs that leaving the EU results in loss of membership privileges.
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Faith in Kant

Faith in Kant

6. Conclusion: faith and trust. According to Kant, there can be practical grounds for deciding to act, and thus for imposing on ourselves the constraint of holding true that we will so act. And there can be practical reasons for setting ends, and thus for imposing on ourselves the constraint of holding true that those ends will be attained. My aim has been to make space for Kant’s otherwise plausible view by divorcing that view from some dubious near relatives. Thus, I’ve explained that such a view needn’t allow that one can decide rationally to do things, or strive for things, that one knows are unattainable. And I’ve explained that such a view needn’t be committed to the idea that practical reasons can provide grounds for belief. In doing so, I appealed to Kant’s specific account of the constitutive aim of holding things true for practical purposes, according to which that aim is the attainment of the highest good. However, the same outcome would be achieved if it were shown, more minimally, that the constitutive aim of holding things true for practical purposes is distinct from the constitutive aim of belief. (Independently, there need be no commitment to the claim that one can decide to believe things, for there need be no commitment to thinking that, simply because deciding to φ entails holding true that one will φ, it follows that deciding to φ entails deciding to hold true that one will φ. So, even if deciding to φ on practical grounds entailed believing that one will φ on practical grounds, it need not entail in addition deciding to believe that one will φ on practical grounds.)
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Faith envy

Faith envy

In Wittgenstein’s work, there is an important shift from the Tractatus (1922), where it is argued that one cannot speak about faith, to the Philosophical Investigations (Wittgenstein 2009), where words are just as applicable to religion and ethics as to anything else, but we need to pay close attention to how these words are used. Desirable faith is still something about what is beyond the ordinary world, but words taken up in a particular way in a particular life could be a part of it. You cannot tell someone’s faith – whether it is worth envy or not – by looking at his or her words alone. As quoted above, what matters is the difference that words make at different points in your life because practice gives words their sense. Simone Weil, during her entire life, moved along the borders of faith. She had long discussions about whether or not she wanted to be baptised (Weil 2002a). She wished to follow Christ whom she regarded as the truth, but her love was not limited to Christ as she found parts of the same truth in the Bhagavad Gita or Marxism as well. She was worried that as a member of the church she would be obliged to follow the teachings of the collective even if she did not find truth in these. She envied the comfort of belonging to a collective, but the risk that it might compromise her relationship with the truth led her to decide to remain a Christian outside the church. In her personal life and in her writing, Weil (2002b) struggles with the meaning of faith and the truth: faith offers the truth and one merely needs to accept it in obedient submission. Weil (2002b) states:
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