Interactive methods of teaching History

Top PDF Interactive methods of teaching History:

Innovation and Implementation of E-interactive Teaching and Learning System for History Theory Course of Sino-foreign Cooperative School-running Specialty

Innovation and Implementation of E-interactive Teaching and Learning System for History Theory Course of Sino-foreign Cooperative School-running Specialty

qualification training and academic exchanges for teachers of Anhui Polytechnic University; both sides must do their utmost to maintain the quality of teaching and ensure compliance with all relevant certification standards."The teaching of design theory keeps a large portion of the teaching system of design majors in universities on the basis of well-studied design theory in the US. Just take Graphic Design major for instance, design history courses usually take up 20%-30% of compulsory courses in the major."[3]Therefore, in the teaching plans of the major, Modern Design History, a basic course in design major appointed by US University,begins in the third semester with a total of 3 credits for 48 teaching hours. Furthermore, other relevant courses such as Art History I, Art History II and History of Graphic Design have contributed to the systematized learning of design theory system. Parts of these courses introduced relevant professional textbook, teaching contents, teaching methods and teachers from cooperative university of the United State. Depending to the need of establishing the course, comprehensive learning of design history courses including Modern Design History will not only help students criticize the role of design cultural field from the perspectives of culture and history but also learn from history. What's more, founded on theoretical guidance in practice, developing the historical review of design practice will improve students' abilities of thinking and innovation in design.
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An analysis of History Teaching Methodology in High schools: A case of Tigania and Igembe districts, Meru County, Kenya

An analysis of History Teaching Methodology in High schools: A case of Tigania and Igembe districts, Meru County, Kenya

Proper teaching is characterized by narration, discussion, reciting, identifying, explaining, role playing, dramatization, audio visual, and modeling (Ministry of Education Science and Technology, Sessional Paper No 1 of 2005). Teaching methods are strategies or approaches employed to convey knowledge and skills in order to enhance and guide successful learning (McCleish, 1968). Nasibi and Kiio (2005) spelt out various History teaching methods that can enable teachers attain better student performance in national examinations. These include lecture method, discussion, narrating, reciting, identifying, role playing, explaining, audio visual, visiting, modelling, dramatizing, note-making, practicing observation, participating, reading and group projects. The didactic method (lecture method): the Jug and Mug has been the most preferred teaching method in the past (Bishop1985:104). The method is still predominant today. The method relies on the teacher (the jug) as the sole source of wisdom, and knowledge who transmutes it to the child (the mug). This method is often non-interactive and boring to the students. As a consequent, students are taught but they do not learn and hence they perform poorly in national examinations is poor. The lecture method has been criticised for being outdated, being passive mode of learning which restrict learners to listening and note taking, and it is a poor way of enhancing the memory of learners (Nasibi and Kiio, 2005:21). Bishop (1985) asserted that learning techniques in many parts of the world are rote. He argued that these methods emphasise cramming for the purpose of passing examination rather than motivating learning. Bishop reiterated that most teachers use the ‘jug and mug’ technique when teaching even though it does not conform to psychological and pedagogical principles of learning. This has been
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TEACHING SOCIAL SCIENCE USING INNOVATIVE METHODS TO HEARING AND SPEECH IMPAIRED STUDENTS

TEACHING SOCIAL SCIENCE USING INNOVATIVE METHODS TO HEARING AND SPEECH IMPAIRED STUDENTS

The Social science subject encompass diverse concerns of society and include a wide range of content, drawn from the disciplines of History, geography, political science, economics and sociology. Therefore social science teaching needs to be revitalized towards helping the learner acquire knowledge and skills in an interactive environment.

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Impact of Multimedia Instruction in Biology on Senior High School Students' Achievement

Impact of Multimedia Instruction in Biology on Senior High School Students' Achievement

The importance of the use of multimedia in teaching and learning cannot be underestimated. Much importantly so when it comes to science-based subjects that are sometimes considered more abstract in content and difficult to grasp. Many studies have acclaimed the innovating effects of computer-based instruction (Labus, Despotovic-Zrakic ́, Radenkovic, Bogdanovic ́, & Radenkovic, 2015). For instance, in a study conducted by Labus et al. (2015) on the possibilities of improving the formal eLearning process with informal game-based learning on social media. A sample of 240 undergraduate students was used for the study. This sample was randomly divided into an experimental group (120 participants) and control group (120 participants). The study found that the experimental group that used the Elab Game achieved better results than the control group. The participants of the experimental group acknowledged that the use of edutainment in learning is interesting and motivating. This study's findings align with a study that found that interactive multimedia had a significant influence on students learning in Biology, specifically, photosynthesis. Julius, Twoli and Maundu (2018) conducted a similar study in Kenya in Chemistry which is somehow closely related to the current study. The study investigated the effect of Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI) on students’ achievement in Atomic Structure Periodic Table and Chemical families as against the use of the conventional instructional method (CIM). It was found that the students who were taught with the CAI obtained higher scores on the posttest compared to those using the CIM. Furthermore, Jesse, Twoli, and Maundu (2015) add to the success story of the use of computers in teaching and learning science-related courses. They concluded in their study on the combined effect of computer-assisted in instruction in the teaching of Biology, Physics, and Chemistry that CAI improves secondary students learning in the sciences. Similar findings were also recorded in Gambari et al. (2014), and Quarcoo-Nelson et al. (2012) in Biology and Physics. This goes to underscore the impressive power and role of computers in education. Although computers are powerful in terms of their ability to deal with large data, their effective application in education is dependent on several factors such teacher's technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). This is because different approaches are needed where facilitation of educational transaction is conducted through technology (Zainuddin & Idrus, 2017).
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ROLE OF SCULPTURES IN TEACHING HISTORY

ROLE OF SCULPTURES IN TEACHING HISTORY

Sculpture has its history and stylistic development is those of western culture. Also known as the “plastic art” for the shaping process or plasticity. Sculpture is only branch of visual arts that is specifically concerned with expressive three – dimensional form. Three dimensional art began with pre-historic sculpture. There are different types of sculpture. There are different types of sculpture like the clay, stone and bronze. Models of personalities then of armours weapons , models of human dwellings ornaments, utensils, costumes etc. models of places which are sites of events are of greatest importance like the kurukshetra and the battle of panipat. so, sculptures have proved to be of help to the teacher while teaching history. Therefore without sculptures history would have been untold completely
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Teaching Advocacy with History and in Context

Teaching Advocacy with History and in Context

May, Allyson. The Bar and the Old Bailey, 1750-1850. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill and London, 2003.(The author describes the history of the English criminal trial and the development of a criminal bar in London between 1750 and 1850. She charts the transformation of the legal process and the evolution of professional standards of conduct for the criminal bar through an examination of the working lives of the Old Bailey barristers of the period. In describing the rise of adversarialism, May uncovers the motivations and interests of prosecutors, defendants, the bench and the state, as well as the often-maligned "Old Bailey hacks" She explores the role of barristers before and after the Prisoners' Counsel Act. 1836 recognized the defendant's right to legal counsel in felony trials and lifted many restrictions on the activities of defence lawyers.She also details the careers of individual members of the bar -describing their civil practice in local, customary courts as well as their criminal practice. A comprehensive biographical appendix augments this discussion.)
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Preliminary Evaluation of a Reform of Methods to Teach Pharmaceutical Polymer Materials Science to a Class of Diverse Majors

Preliminary Evaluation of a Reform of Methods to Teach Pharmaceutical Polymer Materials Science to a Class of Diverse Majors

Electronic devices such as smart phones and tablets are widely used by student and provide an effective medium for convenient and efficient communication between teachers and students. We implemented three new modes of teaching on the WeChat platform based on the PBL teaching method. The first, which we called “one-to-one” teaching, involves establishment of WeChat or QQ friendship between teachers and students to allow teachers to give guidance and explana- tions for questions raised by students in daily learning. However, teachers often find the common questions/ issues that are the same for many students using the “one-to-one” method. In this situation, teachers can use the “one-to-many” teaching mode as shown in Figure 1 The third method is “many-to-many” teaching, where experts in pharmaceutical polymer materials are invited to conduct a “many-to-many” discussion on a problem or phenomenon.
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History teaching and the values agenda

History teaching and the values agenda

teacher must also remain neutral, but my research questions whether this is possible. Teachers’ role in values education will be crucial as “producers, transmitters and legitimators of selected knowledges” (Singh & Henry, 1998, p. 39). Consciously or not, teachers are often involved with values (Arthur et al., 2001). Nielsen (2005) argues that the teacher embodies his/her attitudes, beliefs and patterns of actions – thus highlighting why values education is not a choice in schools, it is inescapable. Aspin (2003) argues that a vital role of the teacher will be to model dispositions, beliefs, values, attitudes, conduct, and judgments ‘we’ wish students to adopt. Forster and Masters (2002) also argue that a profession charged with educating ethics should model ethical conduct. Values are not derived from theoretical knowledge; both citizenship education and values education are as much modelling as ‘teaching’ and are reflected in the relationships between teacher and student (Gore, 1998; Pascoe, 2005). As discussed earlier in relation to the unavoidability of values, the ways in which the teacher as a judge of behaviour and attitudes in the classroom models values positions is seen a key factor of values education. For this reason, my interviews and observation discussed in subsequent chapters highlight how teachers articulate their own values and role in the classroom and in turn how these are understood by their students.
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The Urban design studio as a catalyst for change: Fresh Eyes on Gibsons, Fall 2001

The Urban design studio as a catalyst for change: Fresh Eyes on Gibsons, Fall 2001

Sustainable Communities Design Charrette Holistic Methodology Inclusive Methods Interactive Public Process Interactive Teaching Methods Design Research Methods British Co[r]

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Effective Teaching in History: The Perspectives of History Student-Teachers

Effective Teaching in History: The Perspectives of History Student-Teachers

, measurable and achievable objectives and also give projects that will bring to bear the writing skill of students”. This means that planning of instruction, in the view of the student-teachers, is crucial to effective teaching of History. The finding, thus, reinforces Friesen‟s (2009) assertion that effective teaching is initiated by thoughtfully designing lessons that stimulate students intellectually and academically. On teaching resources, there was a unanimous view that planning on resources will help reduce the abstractness associated with the teaching of History. This means that making decisions on which objectives to set for a lesson is important to effective teaching since objectives serve as the pointers that guide the teaching process. Also teaching resources serve as vehicles by which teachers can effectively convey content knowledge to students. Respondents moreover disclosed that before class hours, it is germane that History teachers consult other teachers on strategies to enhance teaching. This was deemed very important, especially, for new History teachers, because of the multi-dimensional character of History. “History is the mother of many disciplines and so teachers should tap from the knowledge of other teachers on various topics on which such teachers have expert knowledge”, a respondent remarked. Doing this will invariably contribute to making History teaching effective. This concurs with Friesen‟s (2009) view that teachers must improve their practice in the company of other teachers.
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Interactive technology in teaching judgemental forecasting

Interactive technology in teaching judgemental forecasting

After providing the foundations of the Delphi method, the Business Forecasting students (20) were invited to participate in the following specially designed interactive case study. The students were told to assume that they were the panel members in a Delphi exercise. It must be noted that despite the fact that the students were physically in the same room, the privacy and anonymity was achieved and provided by the technology used.

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Research on the Individualization of Foreign Language Teaching Based on MOOCs

Research on the Individualization of Foreign Language Teaching Based on MOOCs

Nowadays, MOOCs has brought great opportunities for college English teaching in China, which is becoming more and more difficult for students to pay attention to. MOOCs provides students with a wide range of courses related to their majors, such as math, statistics, computer science, natural sciences and engineering, so students of applied disciplines have the opportunity to learn the most cutting-edge masters through the network and world-class masters , The most useful scientific knowledge, and constantly updated their knowledge reserves. Application-oriented colleges and universities are mainly oriented to cultivating talents with technology application. With the rapid development of economic globalization, the exchanges and cooperation between China and other countries in various fields are increasing, and many MOOCs courses are taught in English , Which provides students with a good professional English environment, which in order to improve their English ability to provide a broad platform for students to either listen to English courses taught can also be used in English and students from around the world to discuss professional issues , So that students of professional English to get more development opportunities. Teachers can seize this opportunity to encourage students to learn through international MOOCs to test their level of English, demand-oriented language learning, to stimulate students interest in learning English. Students can bring problems in the course of learning MOOCs into the classroom, [9] solve them through peer negotiation, or resolve them by consulting teachers.
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History teaching and the values agenda

History teaching and the values agenda

I wish to express my deep appreciation to the many people and organisations that have supported me in my research. I am indebted to the History teachers and students who gave freely of their time and who provided the rich descriptions that form the basis of my research. My associate supervisor Dr Leanne Dalley-Trim has provided valuable feedback and editorial assistance. For his expertise, encouragement and guidance in the crafts of academia I wish to thank my principal supervisor Associate Professor Melissa Vick.

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Managing emergencies in rural North Queensland: the feasibility of teletraining

Managing emergencies in rural North Queensland: the feasibility of teletraining

Introduction. Historically, the use of videoconference technologies in emergency medicine training has been limited. Whilst there are anecdotal reports of the use of teletraining for emergency medicine by rural doctors in Australia, minimal evidence exists in the literature. This paper aimed to explore the use of teletraining in the context of managing emergency presentations in rural hospitals. Methods. Using a qualitative approach, a mixture of junior and senior doctors were invited to participate in semistructured interviews. Data were transcribed and analysed line by line. Applying the grounded theory principles of open and axial coding, themes and subthemes were generated. Results. A total of 20 interviews were conducted with rural doctors, rural doctors who are medical educators, and emergency medicine specialists. Two major themes—(1) teletraining as education and (2) personal considerations—and ten subthemes were evident from the data. Most participants had some previous experience with teletraining. Access to peer teaching over videoconference was requested by rural generalist registrars. There was a preference for interactive training sessions, over didactic lectures with little mention of technical barriers to engagement. The ability of teletraining to reduce professional isolation was a major benefit for doctors practicing in remote locations. Discussion. For these rural doctors, teletraining is a feasible method of education delivery. Wider application of teletraining such as its use in peer teaching needs to be explored. The benefits of teletraining suggest that teletraining models need to be core business for health services and training providers, including specialist colleges.
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Changing paradigms in teaching English pronunciation: A historical overview

Changing paradigms in teaching English pronunciation: A historical overview

From a historical perspective, it can be argued that pronunciation, more than any other component within the broad construct of second language (L2) speaking ability, has been subject to the whims of the time and the fashions of the day. That is, pronunciation, once dubbed “the Cinderella of language teaching” to depict its potentially glamorous yet marginalised existence (Kelly, 1969, p. 87), experienced a fall from grace after being a focal point of L2 instruction and teacher literacy training during its heyday-a prime example of a pendulum swing in L2 teaching methodologies and practices (Gass, 1996) that have affected substantive coverage for learners in L2 classrooms, often with detrimental effects for stakeholders (e.g. Morley, 1991). Naturally, the aspects of L2 speech (pronunciation) that are ascribed pedagogical value in the minds of teachers and researchers have shifted over time (Munro & Derwing, 2011). However, an aerial view of developments over the past century reveals the polarised nature of researchers’ and practitioners’ beliefs on the relative importance of pronunciation in L2 aural/oral instruction and assessment (p. 1).
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Theatre Etiquette

Theatre Etiquette

1.2 Interactive Theatre History Timeline http://www.glencoe.com/theatre/Timeline/timeline_content.html Theatre History http://www.cwu.edu/~robinsos/ppages/resources/Theatre_History/ Thea[r]

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Query Update Ver 3 Ref Man 60498300J Jun86 pdf

Query Update Ver 3 Ref Man 60498300J Jun86 pdf

Query Update Organization Input/Output Methods Interactive Mode Interactive Transmission of Directives Query Update Interactive Responsn Batch Mode Catalog Operations CRM Catalog Mode CD[r]

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From soap opera to research methods teaching: Developing an interactive website/DVD to teach research in health and social care

From soap opera to research methods teaching: Developing an interactive website/DVD to teach research in health and social care

The commencement of script-writing and dilemmas for the characters initiated discussion of activities. This capitalised on the expertise in the team in designing e-learning activities. The audio offered students a means to engage with and reflect on the ideas raised, being a key element of learning through storytelling (McDrury and Alterio 2003). However, additional activities and tasks were felt to be important in giving learners the opportunity to think more deeply about the concepts and importantly, to use them in ways that tested and developed understanding. Regular self-assessment activities should also help learners identify the strengths and weaknesses in their knowledge and understanding. Initially the team expected to incorporate various links to external resources such as research articles and other websites for example to view data or research tools such as questionnaires, but as the design evolved these options were abandoned, partly to avoid distracting the learner away from the resource but also to have greater control over the material presented. The range of tools in the final version of the resource includes: considering scenarios and ticking responses from a list; drag-and-drop activities to test knowledge and understanding such as definitions, simple concepts and material from the audios; a quiz presented in such a way that each correct answer exposes a section of picture that the learner may seek to complete; entering text into forms and checking responses; interactive graphics where areas are selected and explanatory text pops-up; animated graphs to illustrate data and consequences of different options; simple answer selection with feedback; a fruit machine with winning payout for correct selection of terms. In addition to the necessary text around the activities throughout all the tutorials the learner is directed to listen to the short sections of audio with many of the activities linking to content heard. This variety in interactivity helps to meet preferences for learning through listening, reading, reflecting, decision- making and application.
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Prevalence of axial spondyloarthritis in patients with acute anterior uveitis: a cross sectional study utilising MRI

Prevalence of axial spondyloarthritis in patients with acute anterior uveitis: a cross sectional study utilising MRI

reflect the status of HLA-B27 as the anchor criterion for the clinical arm of the ASAS criteria. In our cohort, the sensitivity and specificity of the DUET algorithm were 52.9% (95% CI 27.8 to 77.0) and 67.9% (95% CI 54.0 to 79.7), respectively. Nearly half of new diagnoses were HLA-B27 negative (none of whom had psoriasis or a recent history of joint pains requiring a GP visit). By applying the DUET algorithm, these HLA-B27 negative patients would have been overlooked. Similarly, the pres- ence of IBP did not predict the diagnosis of axSpA or a positive MRI. Had we relied on IBP rather than CBP before age 45 as a referral strategy, nearly two-thirds of new diagnoses would have been overlooked.
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Computer supported interactive teaching: an experience with triangles

Computer supported interactive teaching: an experience with triangles

countries with the best levels of mathematics (Reynolds & Farrell, 1996). Interactive instruction is a teaching method in which knowledge is created by all students of an entire class while mediated by the teacher. Important in this approach is the active creation of knowledge in which students need to think about the material to be learned and build their own understanding of the material together with their peers. High-quality interactive instruction is “oral, interactive and lively, and will not be achieved by lecturing the class, or by always expecting pupils to teach themselves indirectly from books. It is a two-way process in which pupils are expected to play an active part by answering questions, contributing points to discussions, and explaining and demonstrating their methods and solutions to others in the class” (p. 26, DfEE, 2001). Students construct their own knowledge rather than passively receiving it. In this way they seek out meaning and make mental connections between the learning material and their knowledge (Muijs & Reynolds, 2000).
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