International Relations and Diplomacy

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International Law, International Relations and Diplomacy

International Law, International Relations and Diplomacy

This Master’s degree can help you embark on a successful career in the field of International Law, International Relations and Diplomacy. With this degree, you will deepen your expertise and build a foundation to think beyond your job’s functional limits and position yourself to become a critical agent of change. There are several enriching career opportunities in political spheres and foreign affairs department and graduates can pursue rewarding careers as public figures, diplomats, legal advisors and consultants, research consultants and can secure prominent positions in embassies and governmental institutions and agencies. Graduates can also pursue a PhD programme to enhance their portfolio and competence. When you earn a Master’s degree from Paris-Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi, you join a network of successful graduates who have increased their aptitude and advanced their careers by developing their leadership potential.
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PELIN AYAN MUSIL, PHD. Senior Lecturer School of International Relations and Diplomacy Anglo-American University

PELIN AYAN MUSIL, PHD. Senior Lecturer School of International Relations and Diplomacy Anglo-American University

Chair of the Department of Politics, School of International Relations and Diplomacy, Anglo-American University, Prague, October 2011-present.. PREVIOUS POSITIONS.[r]

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The diplomacy of liberation: The international relations of the African National Congress of south africa, 1960 1985

The diplomacy of liberation: The international relations of the African National Congress of south africa, 1960 1985

00001t tif THE DIPLOMACY OF LI BERATI ON THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF THE AFRICAN NATIONAL CONGRESS OF SOUTH AFRI CA, 1 9 6 0 1 9 8 5 T h e s i s S u b m i t t e d f o r t h e d e g r e e o f P h D[.]

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Innovation policy and international relations: directions for EU diplomacy

Innovation policy and international relations: directions for EU diplomacy

At a national or multilateral government level, a few different models are developing and deserve further dis- cussion. Here, we will briefly consider the cases of China, Europe and the USA. With its Open Science, Open Innovation and Open to the World approach the official EU policy is without doubt the most idealistic among the three. The policies aim at spreading know- ledge as soon as it is available, opening up the innovation process to people with experience in fields other than academia and science, and promoting inter- national cooperation in the research community [40]. Furthermore, the European Union has put a challenges- driven approach and more recently a mission-oriented approach high on its policy agenda for research and innovation. These approaches are predominantly intern- ally oriented, but the knowledge and innovations built under these challenges (for example secure, clean and efficient energy or smart, green and integrated transport) and missions have a broader and mostly global reach. The selection of the challenges and (in the next EU pol- icy period) of missions with specified goals will thus also guide actions in international cooperation. For this, the EU sees international institutions as vital. “In a strategic environment where we can no longer take our rules- based order and shared values for granted, supporting global governance and the United Nations in particular will be an additional priority for the European union” [41]. In other words, the EU prefers to continue to work through the international institutions and to promote innovation as a global public good, even when it recog- nizes that complementary bilateral and multilateral ac- tions might be necessary.
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Migration in International Relations: The Evolution and Implementation of Indonesia's Migration Diplomacy (1979-2019)

Migration in International Relations: The Evolution and Implementation of Indonesia's Migration Diplomacy (1979-2019)

during the bipolar power relation during the Cold War. Third, these refugees also provided stories and narratives of USSR persecution and repression, turned into propaganda by the U.S. in their public diplomacy agenda. This example shows how the mobility of people was managed to achieve more significant objectives rather than merely protecting the people from persecution. Just as other types of diplomacy, the ‘form’ of Migration Diplomacy will differ depending on the interest of the involved State. In the case of the U.S., the ‘open border’ policy during the Cold War diminished along with the dissolution of USSR and its perceived threat. Without any needs to invite high skilled migrants or to create propaganda, the U.S. turned to a stricter border control policy with security interest as its primary foundation as we see it today. Even with this measure, the US still hosts the highest number of the immigrant population in the world with approximately 44 million immigrant population 23 , in contrast to 9
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PREVENTIVE DIGITAL DIPLOMACY IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IN FUTURE

PREVENTIVE DIGITAL DIPLOMACY IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IN FUTURE

Abstract— Offsetting complexity of societal dialogue, netizen has dripped down mollifying social contract – which is also redefining new context in international relations (IR) indeed. With emergence of the Internet, especially web 2.0, convenient media structure has been reshaping to meet expectation of public and new dynamics of social relations are also gaining new vibes which sometimes turns into conflict or into misunderstanding in civil, diplomats and state level affecting IR. The objective of this research is to explore understanding of conflict actualized by the Internet which is vital to enhance new version with conflict resolution in technical aspect. This study is initially designed to explore in three wider prospective of civic, diplomat and state in IR, but it would obviously concentrate on IR employing the Internet of things (IoT) to drag out possible result. Traces of negotiation between relations and enticing power in digital conflict are distinct results of this study however further discussion is plotted social cost of digital conflict as consequence with necessary implications of new version of the Internet incorporating technical resolution as preventive conflict mechanism. This study had revealed those connecting elements of the Internet which mediates social relations towards digital conflicts and drew implications for upcoming third generation web.
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Mastering the Mysteries of Diplomacy: Karl Marx as International Theorist

Mastering the Mysteries of Diplomacy: Karl Marx as International Theorist

My interest here is as much pedagogical as it is theoretical or explanatory – a response to the problem of how to present and represent the subject of international relations in the classroom. My retrieval of Marx and a particular text is rooted in the understanding, first, that the intellectual positions, world-images, and historical trajectories offered to students to make sense of the international have arisen themselves out of specific social-political contexts and lived experiences; and, second, that when those perspectives are put into critical conversation, not just placed end to end, they can help to interrogate common-sense assumptions about the contemporary world. The Paris Commune is a particularly rich example in those respects. Though it may have represented only a short-lived political eruption, suppressed after 72 days in a shockingly brutal show of force, it stands out sharply against comfortable depictions of the ‘long peace’ of post-Napoleonic Europe; and it challenges the teleology of the ‘modern’ nation- state and state-system with the reality of an alternative political form – ‘at once smaller and more expansive,’ more local and more international (Ross 2015, 5). The Paris Commune was a surprise even to those who built it. It puzzled Marx, too, even as it demanded a position from him.
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New public diplomacy and its effects on international level

New public diplomacy and its effects on international level

The term of public diplomacy was first introduced in academia in 1965 by researcher and career diplomat Edmund Guillon, which will establish the Center for Public Diplomacy at the University Edward R. Murrow Tufts. This term was first described in the information material of the Center as "influence public attitudes in the formation and execution of foreign policies. It encompasses dimensions of international relations beyond traditional diplomacy ... [including] the formation of governments, of public opinion in other countries; interaction between private interest groups from different countries; inform the population on international affairs and their influence on domestic policy; communication between those whose function is communication even, as well as diplomats and foreign journalists; (And) the process of intercultural communication."[Dizard Jr. Wilson: 2001]
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e Diplomacy as Instrument for Establishment of Interethnic Relations

e Diplomacy as Instrument for Establishment of Interethnic Relations

Indeed, the discussion of foreign policy and global problems at the level of not only diplomats, but also ordinary users of the Internet and mobile phones can help to strengthen international security through the formation of an atmosphere of trust in the international relations. In this context, digital diplomacy programs contribute to the formation of a single information space, a global of civil society, as well as the folding of the management system in the world politics and the resolution of crises and problems affecting all countries of the world. A wide spreading of social media platforms and new media and their usage by states should be seen as a source of new opportunities for the development and resolution of conflict situations. Indeed, discussions of the problems of the post-conflict at the level of ordinary Internet users and cell phones can help to strengthen the security of formation of an atmosphere of trust in international relations. In this context, e-diplomacy programs promote to formation of a single information space, civil society and the conflict resolutions, and to establish interethnic dialogue. For example, the creation of a social network of young leaders YaLa Young Leaders of the Middle East that includes Palestinians, and Israelis, which allows us to establish links and to establish mutual understanding “ahead of the curve”, prevent a new round of the conflict cycle.[12] Due to its popularity, social media is widely use by the communities, as well as the individuals involved conflict and interested in its settlement and reduction of non- consequences. This is an affordable tool that reduces costs of collective actions, which increases the effectiveness of coordination, not always promotes equally successful results, but widely is used and it is obvious that this trend will continue in the future.
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There is no map : international relations in the Americas

There is no map : international relations in the Americas

These six books offer an excellent opportunity to reflect on how US power (and more importantly, leadership), long oriented the practice and understanding of international politics in the Americas during the Cold War and its aftermath across issues of security, democracy, and diplomacy. Before assessing these books and their place in the field, I want to suggest a metaphor. Even before the Second World War, the United States acted as the principal cartographer for the Western Hemisphere. It drew the most frequently referenced (though not only) maps that depicted the inter-American landscape: these were the desirable destinations; those were the areas to avoid (cave! hic comunistas!). Its maps were drawn in broad strokes, and its representations of particular localities often lacked nuance, inspiring more than a few wrong turns. However, even those who disagreed with the depiction of the topography or chafed at their place in the US-drawn atlas found themselves arguing with reference to it. Though mapmaking requires power and technological clout, the United States was never able to convince, cajole, or coerce everyone. Latin American leaders sometimes denounced the map, other times they whispered in the cartographer’s ear to guide the pen toward an illustration more favorable to their interests.
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Politics and International Relations

Politics and International Relations

Within 3 months of passing the comprehensive examinations, students should publicly present a dissertation proposal that is acceptable to a committee of at least four qualified scholars. Three members of the committee, including the dissertation supervisor, must be graduate faculty members of the Department of International Relations. One must be from outside the department, but inside FIU. Other members must be approved by the International Relations Graduate Program Director. To complete program requirements, Ph.D. degree candidates must enroll for a minimum of 15 dissertation credits and maintain enrollment for 3 credits every semester until the degree is awarded.
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Politics and International Relations

Politics and International Relations

should be taken as early as possible in preparation for upper division work in the major. POS 2042-American Government (or its equivalent) is required of all Political Science majors. This course will also meet one of the two state mandated Common Prerequisites. The second Common Prerequisite may be fulfilled by taking either CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics, or INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations (or their equivalents). These requirements can normally be met through course work at the community college level or taken at FIU. Students should be mindful of the further requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences that a minimum of 48 upper division credits (3000 level and above) is necessary for graduation. Students also need to pass 9 hours in upper division courses outside Political Science and must satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirement.
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Politics and International Relations

Politics and International Relations

In addition, two 2000 level courses are required for a student to meet the department’s prerequisite requirements for majors as well as the state mandated “Common Prerequisites” (see below). These courses should be taken as early as possible in preparation for upper division work in the major. POS 2042-American Government (or its equivalent) is required of all Political Science majors. This course will also meet one of the two state mandated Common Prerequisites. The second Common Prerequisite may be fulfilled by taking either CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics, or INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations (or their equivalents). These requirements can normally be met through course work at the community college level or taken at FIU. Students should be mindful of the further requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences that a minimum of 48 upper division credits (3000 level and above) is necessary for graduation. Students also need to pass 9 hours in upper division courses outside Political Science and must satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirement.
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Politics and International Relations

Politics and International Relations

upper division work in the major. POS 2041-American Government (or its equivalent) is required of all Political Science majors. This course will also meet one of the two state mandated Common Prerequisites. The second Common Prerequisite may be fulfilled by taking either CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics, or INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations (or their equivalents). The department additionally requires a third 2000 level course (see below). These requirements can normally be met through course work at the community college level or taken at FIU. Students should be mindful of the further requirement of the Green School and the College of Arts and Sciences that a minimum of 48 upper division credits (3000 level and above) is necessary for graduation. Students also need to pass 9 hours in upper division courses outside Political Science and must satisfy the Green School and the College of Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirement.
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MA in International Relations:

MA in International Relations:

Lecturer: Dr David Fitzgerald This module Investigates the historical basis of terrorism. It will analyse the many examples of terrorism in an Irish, Europe- an and International context as well as examining the ideologi- cal, political and social basis of terrorist action. The module will be examined through a variety of seminars, readings, original documents and multi-media presentations including DVD documentaries.

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Politics and International Relations

Politics and International Relations

Within 3 months of passing the comprehensive examinations, students should publicly present a dissertation proposal that is acceptable to a committee of at least four qualified scholars. Three members of the committee, including the dissertation supervisor, must be graduate faculty members of the Department of Politics and International Relations. One must be from outside the department, but inside FIU. Other members must be approved by the International Relations Graduate Program Director. To complete program requirements, Ph.D. degree candidates must enroll for a minimum of 15 dissertation credits and maintain enrollment for 3 credits every semester until the degree is awarded.
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THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

SAGE LIBRARY OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS i • VOLUME II.. Approaches to International Relations: Pluralism.[r]

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Department International Relations

Department International Relations

Containing some 15,000 volumes, it provides a wide range of basic literature and reference works for your course as well as specialist literature on current research topics. In addition, the library subscribes to some 200 national and international periodicals and newspapers. The entire stock is catalogued on the Libero library system, which is known for its efficiency and user friendliness. Research into the library’s catalogue can be carried out both within and outside HHL’s network using a WEBOPAC.

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Institute of International Relations

Institute of International Relations

• Erasmus and International students planning their curricula can also freely include in their learning agreements selected courses from other programmes offered in English (Undergraduate Programme in International Relations and Graduate Programme in International Relations). For details, please contact our Erasmus coordinator!

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The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default

The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default

, child exploitation, narcotics and cyber-crime to name a few. It is this distinctive feature of police relationships which distinguish them from more traditional international relationships such as traditional diplomatic or even more so, military relationships, which at their very core often rely on seeking advantage over their international counterparts. It is in this aspect of ‘advantage’ that police differ from both traditional diplomats and military actors. Police perform better when they cooperate rather than compete with each other, to the mutual benefit of their respective citizens. In fact, police are at their most effective when that cooperation and collaboration is maximised and competition minimised. The AFP’s international experience demonstrates this. In that sense, operational policing support and police capacity development missions nest seamlessly with the strategy to protect the Australian community from crime by firstly addressing crime as close to its source as possible, and secondly by helping our neighbours develop their own capabilities, safety, security and eventual peace and prosperity. This inevitably involves police development defined by the AFP as:
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