Jewish life

Top PDF Jewish life:

JEWISH LIFE IN RECHNITZ

JEWISH LIFE IN RECHNITZ

In the 17th century, the Jewish community was established under the protection of the ruling Batthyánys. ‚Letters of safe conduct‘ regulated the rights and duties of the Jewish sub- jects right down to the last detail. These letters, which had to be paid for with protection money, were renewed on a regular basis. The Revolution of 1848 ended the dependency of the ‘Protective Jewry’, and the ‘Israelites‘ Law’ of 1867 awarded the Jewish population political and civil equality. In 1871, the Batthyánys sold their property to Julius von Szájbely, a lawyer. In 1906, industry magnate Heinrich Baron Thyssen-Bornemis- za bought Castle Batthyány. The final ‘Lady of the Castle’ was his daughter Margit, who married Count Ivan Batthyány. From autumn 1944, the castle served as the regional head quarter of the Organization Todt, which was in charge of the constructi- on of the ‘South-east wall’, a military barricade. Jewish forced laborers were billeted in the cellars and stables of the castle. On the night of March 29, 1945, the castle caught fire in the course of the fighting that went on during the town‘s liberation. After the war the castle was leveled, with only a few walls remaining.
Show more

12 Read more

Ekev. Don t Begin with the Basics. Jewish Life Begins with the Loftiest Ideas and That s Fine

Ekev. Don t Begin with the Basics. Jewish Life Begins with the Loftiest Ideas and That s Fine

תוצמב םעט םינתונ ויה םישנא הברהש ומכ ,םדאה המכו תרחאה ןמ רתוי תלעות הב שי הוצמ הזיא ,הז לע דומעל םדאה תופרצמו תויקלא םה תוצמה לבא ,תרחאה ןמ רתוי רכשה הב תוצמה ןמ וזיא תעדל לכונ אלו ,ו[r]

22 Read more

Mandell L. Berman Institute North American Jewish Data Bank, Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life

Mandell L. Berman Institute North American Jewish Data Bank, Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life

Part I: Mandell L. Berm an Institute - North Am erican Jewish Data Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -7- History of the North Am erican Jewish Data Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -7- Mission of the North Am erican Jewish Data Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -8- Current Holdings of the North Am erican Jewish Data Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -8- Part II: Population Estim ation Methodology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -9- Source One: Scientific Estim ates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -9- Source Two: United States Census Estim ates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -10- Source Three: Inform ant Estim ates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -10- Source Four: Internet Estim ates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -10- Part III: Features in the Local Population Estim ates Presented in Table 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -11- Part IV: Changes in Population Estim ates and Confirm ation of Older Estim ates. . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -12- New Scientific Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -12- New Inform ant/Internet Estim ates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -12- New Studies in Progress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -13- Part V: National, State, and Regional Totals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page -13- Part VI: Vignettes of Recently Com pleted and Older Local Studies
Show more

80 Read more

Learning for Jewish Life

Learning for Jewish Life

1. Ask the students if they know the Passover story that we read each year in the Haggadah. Guide them through a simple retelling or invite the students to tell the story. (A long, long time ago, the Israelite people—the name the Jewish people were called back then—were living in Egypt and the king, who was called Pharaoh, made them slaves. After hundreds of years of suffering in slavery, God sent Moses and his brother Aaron to tell the Pharaoh to let the Israelite slaves go free so they could worship God. When Pharaoh didn’t listen, God sent ten plagues that made life miserable for the Egyptians, and finally Pharaoh let the Israelites leave Egypt. They fled across the Sea of Reeds (sometimes called the Red Sea), where they thanked God for their freedom.)
Show more

9 Read more

The Invention of the Jewish People

The Invention of the Jewish People

investigations of scholars such as David Myers and Natalia Aleksiun have shown.(26) But one of the things upon which Jews generally agreed is that they, somehow, comprised a people – not exclusively a fragmented religious community. Rather than ‘religious’ and ‘national’ being distinct categories and diametrically opposed, many facets of Jewish life and culture embodied both. The challenge to the national-minded among the Jews was to make the national dimension vital, meaningful, and the pretext for action. Zionism was, after all, but one of several manifestations of nationalism, while the Bund, which envisioned national-cultural autonomy in Europe based on Yiddish culture, was a more popular alternative in late 19th and early 20th- century Eastern Europe.(27) When Herzl proclaimed in Der Judenstaat ‘we are a people, one people’, he fervently believed it to be true. The problem was not whether or not Jews were a people – but what kind of people they should become, and the specific means by which they should transform themselves. According to Sand, though, the Roman Empire, Christendom, and Islamic civilization must have suffered fantastic common delusions in recognizing Jewry as a people, as well as members of a religious community. The modern nationalization of Jewry was a process that began late, and proceeded with fits and starts. Yet the notion that a Jewish nationality, per se, was something that had to be conjured from thin air makes little sense.
Show more

8 Read more

Gay, Jewish, or Both?

Gay, Jewish, or Both?

The Reconstructionist movement was the fi rst denomination to admit and openly ordain gay and lesbian rabbis in 1984, followed by the Reform move- ment in 1990. As recently as 2006, the Conservative movement’s leading rab- binical body adopted two dramatically opposing positions on homosexuality, culminating several years of intensive deliberations. The more liberal position paved the way for the movement’s rabbinical seminaries in New York and Los Angeles in 2007 to accept openly gay students. This move occasioned a degree of confl ict and controversy in Conservative Judaism, demonstrated in part by the refusal of its associated Israeli seminary to accede to the decision, and threats of rupture by Canadian and other congregations that disagreed with this position. With this latest policy change, all non-Orthodox seminaries in the United States came to accept openly gay and lesbian students for rabbinical and cantorial studies. At the same time, most Reform and Reconstructionist rabbis offi ciate at commitment ceremonies for gay and lesbian couples, even as their Conservative colleagues generally refrain from doing so. In short, the liberalization of attitudes and policies toward the inclusion of gay men and lesbians in Jewish life is of recent vintage, not at all complete, and still contested.
Show more

13 Read more

Watkins_Mixed Multitude Final-no title.pdf

Watkins_Mixed Multitude Final-no title.pdf

These maintenance tests rely on Jewishness being racialized as white. Multiple participants described bringing white, non-Jewish friends with them to synagogue, or attending a synagogue as a multiracial Jewish family, and the white person, regardless of whether or not they are Jewish, is greeted, offered a prayer book, etc., while the Jew of color is, if greeted at all, is perceived to be a non-Jewish visitor. Their presence, based on their physical presentation, is not regarded as being legitimate or genuine. This corresponds to accounts from other participants who no longer participate in institutional Jewish life after a childhood of communal involvement. Without a white parent or white adoptive parents to implicitly explain their presence, some Jews of color felt that the risks of being questioned and excluded were too high to justify consistent participation in Jewish institutions. Several participants shared their hesitance to join or participated in Jewish institutions given prior experiences of rejection or the anticipation of rejection.
Show more

43 Read more

Profiling the Professionals: Who s Serving Our Communities?

Profiling the Professionals: Who s Serving Our Communities?

The Jewish community in North America is distinguished from other religious and ethnic groups by its rich, diverse, and comprehensive set of communal institutions. Their functions and domains are varied and diverse, encompassing religious life, culture, education, health, social services, and community relations. These communal institutions span a range from the well-established to the newly invented, from large to small, and from declining to stable to emerging. They are found in every part of the continent with any sizeable numbers of Jews – and even in places where numerous Jews once lived, but are now few in number. Whatever one may think of these institutions individually, collectively they represent a signature feature of Jewish life, as well as the embodiment of a historical legacy of literally thousands of years.
Show more

40 Read more

HERITAGE SEMINARS to POLAND and PRAGUE July in Poland / August 1-2- Prague Option

HERITAGE SEMINARS to POLAND and PRAGUE July in Poland / August 1-2- Prague Option

Heritage Seminars are unique educational experiences in Eastern Europe which study Jewish history , ancestral roots, and the sources of Jewish life and scholarship. Through extensive visits to the centers of European Jewry and a course of creative academic study that takes place throughout the seminar, participants strengthen their knowledge and awareness. Heritage was conceived with special emphasis on the richness of Jewish life in Eastern Europe before the war, the demise of that lifestyle during the Holocaust, as well as the contemporary Jewish community in Poland today. The seminar is accredited by the Rothberg International School at Hebrew University. All programs include orientation and advance preparation. Heritage excels at meticulous planning in educational curriculum, logistics, staffing, kashrut requirements, medical personnel, and security. To date, we have served the educational needs of over 8000 participants since our inception in 1990. In most cases, Adults have not had the opportunity to experience this unique educational event. It is an impacting experience that gains knowledge, insight and strengthened Jewish identity.
Show more

5 Read more

Extremely Elevated Relative Risk of Paraffin Lamp Oil Exposures in Orthodox Jewish Children

Extremely Elevated Relative Risk of Paraffin Lamp Oil Exposures in Orthodox Jewish Children

ABSTRACT. Background. In observance of the Sab- bath and other religious holidays, many Orthodox Jews maintain a burning lamp that uses paraffin lamp oil as fuel. Unintentional pediatric exposure to paraffin lamp oil, a hydrocarbon, is typically by ingestion and carries a risk of aspiration with subsequent pneumonitis. This investigation was prompted by an apparent increase in paraffin lamp oil exposures during the Jewish Sabbath, from sunset Friday until sunset Saturday, noted by the staff of our regional poison control center.

5 Read more

A Jewish Perspective on Birthdays

A Jewish Perspective on Birthdays

II. The significance of a birthday. The Talmud Yerushalmi (Rosh Hashana 3:8) records that when Amalek came to do battle with the Jewish people, they were careful to have those whose birthday it was, fight on the front lines. The commentator Korban Edah explains that on one’s birthday, he has a special mazal that may be helpful in an otherwise risky situation. The Chida (Chomas Onach Iyov chapter 3) points out that this is not merely a belief of the pagan nations, but is actually firmly rooted in kabbalistic sources. The Chida writes that on one’s birthday his mazal is particularly strong. Based on this idea, the great Sephardic Chacham, Rabbi Chaim Paladgi writes that one should give extra tzedakah on his birthday because the increased mazal of the day will allow a person’s actions to have a greater impact on his overall personality and character (Tzedakah L’chaim). The Arvei Nachal (Parshas Shemini) writes that when a person focuses his efforts on a particular positive character trait on his birthday, Hashem will supply extra help to continue along that path (cited by Sefer Minhag Yisrael Torah page 264).
Show more

5 Read more

MAESTRO. Foreign Rights Submission: Talented, energetic and world famous Stehgeiger. Biography of Paul Godwin paints a special life.

MAESTRO. Foreign Rights Submission: Talented, energetic and world famous Stehgeiger. Biography of Paul Godwin paints a special life.

Thirteen years later, during the Roaring Twenties, all of Berlin knows him as Paul Godwin, the most famous Stehgeiger in that bustling city. Millions of his records are sold all over the world and he becomes a millionaire. But when Hitler comes to power in 1933, his life turns into a nightmare.

7 Read more

The mirror stage of movement intellectuals? Jewish criticism of Israel and its relationship to a developing social movement

The mirror stage of movement intellectuals? Jewish criticism of Israel and its relationship to a developing social movement

legitimate grievances’ (Polner and Merken 2007: xv) does not alter the fact that these ‘others’ are but rarely spoken of. This can even (or especially) be seen in those travelogues where the author ‘meets the Arabs’. In this voyage of the enlightened soul, Palestinians, often called Arabs, are usually treated as useful native guides to have - for part of the way. For instance Kenny Freeman talks about how he daringly moves to the Jewish town of Nazareth Illit which he described as being ‘attached to’ the Palestinian Israeli town of Nazareth, a nice euphemism which allows him to elide over the ethnic cleansing that caused it to be so, or the present day power relations between Nazareth and Nazareth Illit (Ezzat 2006).
Show more

28 Read more

Holocaust writing and the limits of influence

Holocaust writing and the limits of influence

there are more popular, non-literary manifestations of the removal of the Holocaust writing from the actual historical events. Perhaps the most conspicuous example is the transformation of the Jewish district of Kraków following Steven Spielberg’s film Schindler’s List. Previously neglected Kazimierz has become a focus point for countless, primarily American tourists, who want to see the ‘authentic’ Jewish quarter. It is not clear any more whether Kazimierz is seen as ‘authenthic’, because it was once populated by the Jews, or whether its ‘authenticity’ is
Show more

23 Read more

Does religion spoil your sex life? Exploring sexual satisfaction in the Jewish community

Does religion spoil your sex life? Exploring sexual satisfaction in the Jewish community

McCabe, Cummins, and Romeo (1996) which consists of 13 subscales measuring knowledge, experience, feelings and needs of respondents in a range of sexual areas. Three of the subscales seemed particularly useful for this study; body part identification, sex education and sexual interaction. However, the measure included pictures which were both outdated and inappropriate for the target population. After consultation with a Rabbi about the propriety of using sexually explicit pictures with an Orthodox population, it was decided not to use this measure. The other measure that was considered was the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory which has a subscale for sexual knowledge that has been used independently in previous studies (see Appendix F) and has good validity as a measure (Reissing, Binik, Khalif, Cohen, & Amsel, 2003). However, the language is outdated and some of the questions relate to masturbation and use of condoms such as “The prophylactic (rubber) protects against contraception and against venereal disease” which, as previously discussed, is not appropriate for an Orthodox Jewish population. Given that neither of these measures where ideal for the target population the researcher felt it was preferable to create a measure of sexual knowledge for the purpose of this study that was specifically appropriate for Orthodox Jewish participants.
Show more

293 Read more

The Jewish Holidays -

The Jewish Holidays -

slavery – the Jew from Egypt, the Christian from sin. Think about the tenth plague in Exodus 12:5 when Egypt’s first born sons died while the angel of death “passed over” the Jewish homes with the blood of the lamb on their door posts. In the B’rit Chadashah, Jesus serves as the sacrificial lamb. It is no coincidence that our Lord Himself was sacrificed on Passover. In Egypt the Jew marked his house with the blood of the lamb. Today the Christian marks his house – his body, “the house of the spirit” with the blood of Christ. Passover, then, represents our salvation.
Show more

5 Read more

"Leveiya": The process of the Jewish Funeral Service

"Leveiya": The process of the Jewish Funeral Service

Once a Jewish person dies, there are many rituals that must be taken care of in order to give the deceased the respect he or she deserves. When a person dies, someone close to the deceased, whether it be a relative or close friend, must close the eyes and mouth of the deceased and pull a sheet over his or her head. All of the mirrors in the house should be covered to avoid personal vanity in times of tragedy and also to lessen the over-concern that many place on appearance. Another reason for the mirrors to be covered is to take emphasis away from the beauty of a person’s flesh at a time when another person’s body has begun the process of decay in the same house. (Habenstein, 194; Lamm, 4)
Show more

10 Read more

PROGRAM SCHEDULE WVCY-TV CHANNEL

PROGRAM SCHEDULE WVCY-TV CHANNEL

2:00 MOVIE: C.H. SPURGEON: THE PEOPLE’S PREACHER – This powerful, inspirational drama-documentary faithfully recreates the times of C.H. Spurgeon and brings the “people’s preacher” to life as it follows his trials and triumphs with historical accuracy.

7 Read more

There's the culture and then there's the religion : exploring the potential of cultural identity for Jewish adolescents

There's the culture and then there's the religion : exploring the potential of cultural identity for Jewish adolescents

As mentioned, the greatest impact on youth religiosity is overwhelmingly said to be from parents and other family. To assess this relationship in this study, I look at the religious affiliation of parents and compare it to that of adolescent respondents. Table 3 demonstrates the relationship between parent Jewish affiliation, in various combinations, and youth Jewish affiliation. Surprisingly, six respondents identified as Jewish without having either parent do so. When added to the households with at least one Jewish parent, this brings the total number of Jewish households in the survey to 146. As Table 3 shows, from these 146 households, 34 respondents do not self-identify as Jewish, which amounts to 28.29%. So, loss of Jewish identity from generation to generation may be a valid concern. However, it is important to note that a large number of identified Jewish adolescents say that they are more culturally than religiously Jewish. As noted above, a great number of these youth do not attend services regularly, do not attend Hebrew school, and generally practice less than religiously Jewish youth. Self-identification is thus a crucial element in identifying Jewish survey respondents; measuring Jewishness solely by practice could falsely raise the percentage of ‘lost’ Jews.
Show more

40 Read more

Religion, Politics and American Foreign Policy in the Middle East

Religion, Politics and American Foreign Policy in the Middle East

talks in 1948 that ended the conflict between Israel and the Arab states, following Israel‘s declaration of independence. According to one Israeli commentator, the Green Line ―had always been regarded as nothing more than an artificial line of separation eventually to be reworked,‖ and that ―[f]or most Israeli leaders in 1967, the occupation of the West Bank was a sign that the future territorial order would be vastly different from the one they had lived with for the previous 19 years.‖ See David Newman, ―A Green Line in the Sand,‖ NEW YORK TIMES, January 9, 2007, p. 19. Professor Newman goes on to say that in 1967, the Green Line was removed from all official maps, atlases and school books, but that in reality the Green Line remained the administrative boundary, separating Israel from the West Bank, with one law for the Jewish and Arab citizens of Israel and a quite different law for the Palestinian residents of the West Bank. Even Israeli settlers who moved to the West Bank were subject to the military authorities and not Israeli law, to show that Israel had not extended civilian law to the West Bank. Professor Newman then observes that in the past decade, ―for most Israelis, the Green Line has once again become the line separating the relatively safe roads of Israel from the danger of the West Bank,‖ and that ―[f]ew Israelis, other than the settlers, venture beyond it, even when doing so would make their route shorter.‖ The West Bank separation barrier has been constructed in large sections along the Green Line, and in 2007, Israel‘s Education Minister ordered that the Green Line border be reintroduced in all texts and maps in the Israeli school system. He concludes that, ―The Green Line is the default boundary, and it has finally been recognized anew by the Israeli government.‖
Show more

23 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...