Jisc Collections

Top PDF Jisc Collections:

Report on offset agreements : evaluating current Jisc Collections deals  Year 1 – evaluating 2015 deals

Report on offset agreements : evaluating current Jisc Collections deals Year 1 – evaluating 2015 deals

This report is a comparative study of the different offset agreements that Jisc Collections has negotiated to date on behalf of UK academic libraries. It relies on financial data provided by higher education institutions (HEIs) themselves about the amounts they have paid for subscriptions and APCs. The most recent full year for which financial data was available at the time of publication was 2015, so this report will focus on the five offsetting agreements in use for the duration of that year. These are from the publishers Wiley, Taylor & Francis, SAGE, the Institute of Physics, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. All five agreements are pilots and therefore subject to revision in subsequent years. 1

21 Read more

Report on offset agreements: evaluating current Jisc Collections deals  Year 3 – evaluating 2017 deals

Report on offset agreements: evaluating current Jisc Collections deals Year 3 – evaluating 2017 deals

This report is a comparative study of the current offset agreements that Jisc Collections has negotiated on behalf of UK academic libraries. It relies on financial data provided by higher education institutions (HEIs) themselves about the amounts they have paid for subscriptions and APCs. At the time of publication, the most recent full year for which financial data was available was 2017, so this report will focus on the six offset agreements in use for the duration of that year. These are from the publishers Wiley, Taylor & Francis, Springer, SAGE, the Institute of Physics (IOP Publishing), and De Gruyter. All six agreements are pilots and therefore subject to revision in subsequent years. The Royal Society of Chemistry offsetting scheme ceased at the end of 2016 3 and has been replaced by a different scheme for 2017–18.

26 Read more

Report on offset agreements : evaluating current Jisc Collections deals  Year 3 – evaluating 2017 deals

Report on offset agreements : evaluating current Jisc Collections deals Year 3 – evaluating 2017 deals

This report is a comparative study of the current offset agreements that Jisc Collections has negotiated on behalf of UK academic libraries. It relies on financial data provided by higher education institutions (HEIs) themselves about the amounts they have paid for subscriptions and APCs. At the time of publication, the most recent full year for which financial data was available was 2017, so this report will focus on the six offset agreements in use for the duration of that year. These are from the publishers Wiley, Taylor & Francis, Springer, SAGE, the Institute of Physics (IOP Publishing), and De Gruyter. All six agreements are pilots and therefore subject to revision in subsequent years. The Royal Society of Chemistry offsetting scheme ceased at the end of 2016 3 and has been replaced by a different scheme for 2017–18.

25 Read more

Report on offset agreements : evaluating current Jisc Collections deals  Year 2 – evaluating 2016 deals

Report on offset agreements : evaluating current Jisc Collections deals Year 2 – evaluating 2016 deals

This report is a comparative study of the different offset agreements that Jisc Collections has negotiated to date on behalf of UK academic libraries. It relies on financial data provided by higher education institutions (HEIs) themselves about the amounts they have paid for subscriptions and APCs. The most recent full year for which financial data was available at the time of publication was 2016, so this report will focus on the six offset agreements in use for the duration of that year. These are from the publishers Wiley, Taylor & Francis, Springer, SAGE, the Institute of Physics (IOP Publishing), and the Royal Society of Chemistry. All six agreements are pilots and therefore subject to revision in subsequent years. The Royal Society of Chemistry offsetting scheme ceased at the end of 2016 3 and has been replaced by a

22 Read more

Report on offset agreements: evaluating current Jisc Collections deals  Year 1 – evaluating 2015 deals

Report on offset agreements: evaluating current Jisc Collections deals Year 1 – evaluating 2015 deals

This report is a comparative study of the different offset agreements that Jisc Collections has negotiated to date on behalf of UK academic libraries. It relies on financial data provided by higher education institutions (HEIs) themselves about the amounts they have paid for subscriptions and APCs. The most recent full year for which financial data was available at the time of publication was 2015, so this report will focus on the five offsetting agreements in use for the duration of that year. These are from the publishers Wiley, Taylor & Francis, SAGE, the Institute of Physics, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. All five agreements are pilots and therefore subject to revision in subsequent years. 1

22 Read more

Report on offset agreements: evaluating current Jisc Collections deals  Year 2 – evaluating 2016 deals

Report on offset agreements: evaluating current Jisc Collections deals Year 2 – evaluating 2016 deals

This report is a comparative study of the different offset agreements that Jisc Collections has negotiated to date on behalf of UK academic libraries. It relies on financial data provided by higher education institutions (HEIs) themselves about the amounts they have paid for subscriptions and APCs. The most recent full year for which financial data was available at the time of publication was 2016, so this report will focus on the six offset agreements in use for the duration of that year. These are from the publishers Wiley, Taylor & Francis, Springer, SAGE, the Institute of Physics (IOP Publishing), and the Royal Society of Chemistry. All six agreements are pilots and therefore subject to revision in subsequent years. The Royal Society of Chemistry offsetting scheme ceased at the end of 2016 3 and has been replaced by a

23 Read more

‘Total cost of ownership’ of scholarly communication : managing subscription and APC payments together

‘Total cost of ownership’ of scholarly communication : managing subscription and APC payments together

The data gathered by Information Power was used to populate tools developed to model the impact of local offsetting for particular insti- tutions and publishers. Being able to use real subscription and APC expenditure data rather than estimates increases the accuracy of the modelling which puts Jisc Collections in a bet- ter negotiating position and allows us to make firmer predictions about the next few years. An example of this is that we could look at an institution’s subscription and APC expen- diture for the previous year and then use the average growth trends across all institutions

5 Read more

Moving the British National Collections

Moving the British National Collections

selected. Different criteria would apply to different types of collections, as prints and drawings, manuscripts, rare books, sound recordings, printed books, loose archives, seals, paintings, globes and map cabinets (to mention but a few) would all need different ways of packing (specified by the BL) and transportation. In the end five different firms were employed to move different parts of the collections. Also the quantity of material to be moved and the speed of moving would vary according to the material itself, but also ac- cording to the idiosyncracies of the source buildings − all in central London, all with local access and traffic problems. The best-known and most troublesome building to move out of was the British Museum, where mean- while local alterations and extensive re-building had to take place, occasional- ly obstructing and frequently disrupting the book moves. Negotiations with BM colleagues and their contractors started friendly enough, but became ex- tremely fraught towards the end.

6 Read more

Nineteenth Century Collections Online

Nineteenth Century Collections Online

The papers of the stage include the records of Drury Lane under Sheridan 1776–1832. However, the big ticket items are the collections of Barry Ono and Sabine Baring-Gould and Thomas Crampton. Barry Ono (1876–1941) was an English variety performer who had a passion for collecting Victorian penny dreadfuls at a time when these were fairly easy to obtain. He left his collection of roughly 700 titles to the British Library where it has been a resource for anyone interested in popular fiction during the 19th century. If one needed a copy of Jack Harkaway Among the Malay Pirates, the British Library was the place to go. Now this kind of material will be available to scholars more generally, and it will not be a surprise if we see a new wave of studies of Victorian popular fiction emerge in its wake. The same is true of the Reverend Sabine Baring- Gould, the folklorist, who collected ballads and broadsides. This is one of the best ballad collections and I have raided it myself in the past. In the same spirit, we have the music dealer Thomas Crampton’s

5 Read more

Testing Properties of Collections of Distributions

Testing Properties of Collections of Distributions

There are several possible directions for further research on testing properties of collections of distribu- tions, and we next give a few examples. One natural extension of our results is to give algorithms for testing the property of clusterability for k > 1 in the sampling model. One may also consider testing properties of collections of distributions that are defined by certain measures of distributions, and may be less sensitive to the exact form of the distributions. For example, a very basic measure is the mean (expected value) of the distribution, when we view the domain [n] as integers instead of element names, or when we consider other domains. Given this measure, we may consider testing whether the distributions all have similar means (or whether they should be modified significantly so that this holds). It is not hard to verify that this property can be quite easily tested in the query model by selecting Θ(1/ε) distributions uniformly and estimating the mean of each. On the other hand, in the sampling model an Ω( √ m) lower

53 Read more

The Sticky Resting Box, a new tool for studying resting behaviour of Afrotropical malaria vectors

The Sticky Resting Box, a new tool for studying resting behaviour of Afrotropical malaria vectors

First, SRB was shown to perform quite consistently with traditional collection methods with reference to: i) the relative overall densities of Anophelinae collected; ii) the relative proportions of Anophelinae females and males collected during the rainy season (while more females than males were found in SRB during the dry season); iii) An. gambiae species population dynamics. Moreover, SRB collected high genera/species diversity, comparable to that observed in PIT collections outdoors, but much higher than that attained by BP aspirations indoors, which appear to strongly underestimate the indoor presence of species other than those of the An. gambiae complex. These features make SRB potentially useful for faunistic and explorative purposes in areas where the presence of mosquito species and/or their phenology are unknown. Interestingly, for instance, a very high abundance of Culex decens (a container-breeding Afrotropical species, potentially implicated in the transmission of arbovi- ruses, such as Rift Valley Fever, [24]) was revealed by all methods, with the relative abundance of the species be- ing much higher in collections by SRB, particularly dur- ing the dry season.

11 Read more

Management of Germplasm Collections in Chickpea

Management of Germplasm Collections in Chickpea

Collection of plant genetic resources primarily aims at tapping of germplasm and its wild relatives/related species from different agro-ecological/phyto-geographical regions. High genetic diversity for chickpea is available in Gangetic and Indus plains. As early as in 1940, sporadic surveys were undertaken and 85 germplasm accessions were assembled at Imperial Institute of Agricultural Research, Pusa, Bihar (Shaw and Ram 1934, Pal 1938). During the first phase, emphasis was laid on single plant selection from germplasm collections and some of important germplasm were released as varieties including C 235, G 24, S 26, C 104, Type 1, Type 2, Gwalior 21 and Ujjain 21 (Argikar 1970). Systematic plant exploration in India was initiated with the establishment of Plant Introduction Scheme in the erstwhile Botany Division of the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi in 1946. Later in 1956, it was elevated to Division of Introduction. A large number of germplasm collections was made from different parts of the country and used for making selections during 1948-1965. This resulted in identification of some of the most popular varieties such as Chaffa, Annegeri 1, Co 1, RS 10, ST 4, BR 75 and Type 3.

12 Read more

Bio collections in autism research

Bio collections in autism research

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders with diverse clinical manifestations and symptoms. In the last 10 years, there have been significant advances in understanding the genetic basis for ASD, critically supported through the establishment of ASD bio-collections and application in research. Here, we summarise a selection of major ASD bio-collections and their associated findings. Collectively, these include mapping ASD candidate genes, assessing the nature and frequency of gene mutations and their association with ASD clinical subgroups, insights into related molecular pathways such as the synapses, chromatin remodelling, transcription and ASD-related brain regions. We also briefly review emerging studies on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to potentially model ASD in culture. These provide deeper insight into ASD progression during development and could generate human cell models for drug screening. Finally, we provide perspectives concerning the utilities of ASD bio-collections and limitations, and highlight considerations in setting up a new bio-collection for ASD research.

36 Read more

Validation and Reproducibility Assessment of Tigecycline MIC Determinations by Etest

Validation and Reproducibility Assessment of Tigecycline MIC Determinations by Etest

Bacteria. An identical set of five bias/precision test organism collections (aer- obes, anaerobes, nonpneumococcal streptococci, S. pneumoniae, and H. influen- zae) were tested once by each of three study sites using Etest. The composition of each group of organisms is detailed in Table 1. Each of the study sites also tested five collections of clinical isolates (aerobes, anaerobes, nonpneumococcal streptococci, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae); details on each of the five organism groups are presented in Table 2. At least 50% of the strains comprising the clinical collection were defined as fresh clinical isolates, having been on an agar plate for less than 7 days and never frozen. The remainder of the strains could be sourced from existing clinical collections. In addition, study site 1 used five “AST challenge” collections (aerobes, anaerobes, nonpneumococcal strep- tococci, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae) comprising strains from various cul- ture collections with a wide range of susceptibilities to tetracyclines and tigecy- cline and/or resistance to other antibiotics to specifically evaluate whether Etest tigecycline can reliably detect tigecycline-intermediate and -resistant (nonsus- ceptible) organisms. The make-up of the AST challenge collections is also de- tailed in Table 2. Quality control (QC) strains recommended by the CLSI for aerobes, anaerobes, nonpneumococcal streptococci, S. pneumoniae, and H. in- fluenzae (Table 3) were used throughout the studies and comprised part of the reproducibility collections.

6 Read more

Collections in Early Bolzano

Collections in Early Bolzano

Let us consider Bolzano’s examples of collections. Many of late Bolzano’s examples belong to the causal order and hence are hardly sets but wholes. This is true for bodies in general (AT 53; PU §14, 54), human bodies in particular, their parts, such as eyes and hands, and parts of these parts (AT 102), human beings or persons (AT 33–34), especially kings, ministers and subjects of a state (EG sec. 3, §9, 102–03), a group of travellers (AT 34), a group of founders (WL I, §83, 398), a society of people (WL I, §84, 399; EG sec. 3, §11, 104), a state (EG sec. 3, §9, 102), a city (AT 33), a pile of coins (WL I, §84, 399), a watch (WL I, §79, 368), a ball (AT 304) and a drinking glass (PU §4, 41). To some of these entities Bolzano additionally assigns properties entailing that they belong to the causal world: cities can burn, human beings may be benevolent, and a group of travellers may cover a particular distance (AT 33–34). Furthermore, he states that bodies produce effects (AT 53; PU §14, 54), and more generally, that collections may cause a certain outcome (WL I, §82, 394) as well as that they sometimes make an impact not to be generated by their parts (AT 84). As to the collection of all created beings, he even comes straight to the point by emphasising that it is real (PU §25, 72–73).

25 Read more

Embedding blended learning in a university’s teaching culture: experiences and reflections

Embedding blended learning in a university’s teaching culture: experiences and reflections

The authors wish to acknowledge the funding bodies, JISC and NSF, and in particular the sympathetic and insightful support of Susan Eales, JISC Programme Manager for the Digital Libraries in the Classroom initiative during the developmental years of the DialogPLUS project; Professor Gràinne Conole, now at the UK’s Open University, who was the driving force behind the design of the Learning Activity Toolkit; and all the DialogPLUS geographers and learning technologists who have worked so collaboratively and untiringly to adopt blended learning practices, to source or create digital resources to improve student learning, and to evaluate and improve the innovations.

17 Read more

Download
			
			
				Download PDF

Download Download PDF

Session Four: Understanding Costs and Risks/Preservation Metadata The practitioner track of the final session of the first day was dedicated to understanding the costs and risks of preservation. Paul Wheatley (British Library) introduced the LIFE and LIFE² Projects, which aim to provide a methodology for monitoring and ultimately predicting the costs of preservation in both the short and long terms. The methodology is supported by a model of preservation stages (high- level processes) and elements (low-level functions and activities), which is used to break down and identify relevant costs. Rory McLeod recounted how the British Library’s Digital Preservation Team conducted a risk assessment for the Library’s digital collections, and found that almost all the material held on optical media and magnetic tape was at high risk, particularly but not exclusively from media

14 Read more

Final report of work-with-IT: the JISC study into evolution of working practices

Final report of work-with-IT: the JISC study into evolution of working practices

The overall impression is that technology-driven change is increasingly becoming the norm. This constant change causes concern in three areas. Firstly, if change is ineffectively managed, a long-lasting effect on staff attitudes towards both the particular innovation and technology in general emerges. Secondly, the pace of change is of concern. Thirdly, there is a worry that technology is driving change without proper alignment with strategic business objectives. Two reasons can be identified for this mismatch with strategic business objectives. Firstly, technology may be inappropriately employed by managers to drive change. While as Duke et al’s [15] JISC study into the integration of technology into institutional strategies argues that technology can have a transformational role, the concern expressed by participants is that it is employed to drive change without a proper understanding of how this can actually be achieved. This links with Duke et al’s findings that lack of technology literacy within the Senior Management Team of an institution leads to a fundamental lack of understanding regarding how technology may be effectively employed to aid transformation or as a strategic enabler. Secondly, the increase in adoption of Web 2.0 technologies is driving change from the bottom-up. Good practice suggests that strategies should be cascaded so that there is an onus on individual staff and departments to ensure that their activities conform to a departmental business strategy, which is strongly aligned with that of the institution. However, such bottom-up approaches may conflict with institutional ICT strategies which have been developed to ensure cost effective core services and minimise duplication. If such problems are to be avoided then one solution might be to follow Duke et al’s advice that technology be fully integrated within individual business strategies rather than as a separate ICT strategy. Unfortunately, Duke et al find little evidence that this is happening in academia.

123 Read more

Dynamic Link Inclusion in Online PDF Journals

Dynamic Link Inclusion in Online PDF Journals

The Open Journal Framework Project makes use of this kind of controller to help the user navigate through large suites of collected but separate Internet resources, all integrated by the use of linkbases. By introducing a model of Internet resources (collec- tions of documents and associated link databases) and aggregations of these resources (collections of collections of documents and associated link databases), it is possible to define the user' s ' static location' in a document space, and hence to know which hy- pertext actions are applicable at each point in that document space. If the user travels outside all known resources (e.g. to a colleague' s personal home page), then the option still remains to apply the most general links or else to have the link server refrain from applying any links. Without this model the same sets of link databases are applied to any document which the user sees.

14 Read more

Is green a grey area? Sustainability and inclusivity; the
ageing population and recycling

Is green a grey area? Sustainability and inclusivity; the ageing population and recycling

crucial areas. It doesn't account for inflation or efficiency improvements. It assumes that the UK waste collection characteristics are identical to Sheffield's. As the 60+ population in Sheffield is 5 times greater than households benefiting from an assisted collection service, it has been assumed that all assisted collections will be in the 60+ population. Whilst this is unlikely to be completely true, figure 5 illustrates the dramatic increase in probability of having any form of disability, a severe disability and requiring assistance over the age of 65 in the United States of America. This amply substantiates this assumption until more data is obtained.

11 Read more

Show all 906 documents...