Knowledge and understanding about mental health

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Primary school teachers and child mental health: developing knowledge and understanding

Primary school teachers and child mental health: developing knowledge and understanding

indications of child mental health issues (CMHIs) (Department for Education [DfE], 2014b). This mixed methods study aimed to extend the research literature by exploring primary school teachers’ (PSTs’) current understanding of CMHIs; their awareness and previous use of mental health (MH) resources; and their perceptions of how they could best be supported to develop their knowledge of MH. The mixed methods design was implemented in order to collect both quantitative and qualitative data from questionnaires and semi-­‐structured interviews. Both strands of data were analysed separately with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The findings indicate that the majority of PSTs in this sample had not received specific training about CMH and reported general uncertainty and confusion about the concept. The PSTs’ awareness and previous involvement with professional agencies were higher than digital and literary resources. The participants requested detailed case studies and opportunities for context-­‐specific learning with ‘experts’, similar to mentoring and coaching
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Understanding information resources for college student mental health: A knowledge graph approach

Understanding information resources for college student mental health: A knowledge graph approach

Abstract. Many universities and colleges have not provided well-organized and easy to use mental health related information resources to their students although mental illness has become a significant barrier to college student success. This study aims to understand the information resources important to college student mental health (CSMH). We conducted a content analysis of two CSMH websites as the first step to build a knowledge graph for CSMH. Two site maps are developed based on the analysis. Seven types of information are therefore identified and considered important for colleges to provide to their students: Appointment, Mental Disorders, Self-help Resources, Information for Parents, Local Referral Sources, Substance Abuse Prevention, and University Policies on Mental Disorders. The next step of this study is to develop ontology by verifying the seven types of information and establishing their relationships. More CSMH websites will be examined to achieve reliable results.
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Reducing Gaps in Knowledge About Electroconvulsive Therapy Among Mental Health Nurses

Reducing Gaps in Knowledge About Electroconvulsive Therapy Among Mental Health Nurses

Chapter 2: Literature Review A literature search began with a focus on the problem of interest, which states that a gap in knowledge about ECT among mental health nurses is undermining the care of patients who need ECT for serious mental illness. Search terms included barriers, electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, knowledge and attitude, mental illness, nurses’ role, and stigma. OneSearch, through Brown Library, produced an unfiltered result list of 140,171 articles. The search was originally filtered for full text, scholarly peer-reviewed sources, and a date range limited from 2013 to the present. The list included 112 articles using advanced and Boolean search terms such as AND stigma, AND teaching, OR education. Analyzing articles for inclusion in the review and rejecting articles that were not relevant reduced the list to 61 articles from databases, including CINAHL, EBSCO, Google Scholar, Mendeley, and PubMed. Descriptive studies, international studies, randomized clinical trials, dissertations, and meta-analyses contributed to this review.
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Your Mental Health A Survey of Americans Understanding of the Mental Health Parity Law

Your Mental Health A Survey of Americans Understanding of the Mental Health Parity Law

A Survey of Americans’ Understanding of the Mental Health Parity Law An overwhelming majority of Americans remain unaware and unfamiliar with a new law providing equal coverage of mental health benefits by insurance companies according to a recent survey conducted by Harris Interactive for the American Psychological

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Understanding knowledge as a mental state in normal and autistic children

Understanding knowledge as a mental state in normal and autistic children

for instance "the mind tells your legs where to go " (p.271, W ellman, 1990, reporting results from Johnson &Wellman (1982)). In sum, what Wellman (1990) argues is that three-year-old children have an initial theory of mind because they can differentiate what is mental from what is real. T hey can also predict human action on the basis of belief-desire psychology, so that a person would act not only to satisfy her/his desires but do this according to his/her beliefs. How ever, their belief- desire psychology is not as sophisticated as an adult; what they have is a copy understanding o f representations and a copy view o f mind. They have a hit-and-miss view o f representations. With this level of understanding three-year-olds are able to understand true beliefs, ignorance and incomplete knowledge, but they fail to understand that representations may occur with inference, and exposure to only one part o f an object may not always create a correct representation o f that object. In addition, three-year-old children fail to understand false beliefs and the appearance / reality distinction. According to Wellman, what develops around the age of four o r five is an interpretative understanding of representations and an understanding o f mind as an active information processor. With this development a child reaches the adult-like hom uncular theory o f mind.
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Children's suggestibility in relation to their understanding about sources of knowledge

Children's suggestibility in relation to their understanding about sources of knowledge

reporting is not just due to memory failure (O’Neill & Gopnik, 1991). An associated view is that young children suffer from something equivalent to extreme source amnesia (O’Neill & Chong, 2001). These authors suggest that children are unable “to become explicitly or declaratively aware of the source of perceptual experiences, perhaps as a result of an inability to process the source at the time of learning the perceptual information” (p814). In O’Neill and Chong’s study, 3 year olds were very poor at repeating an action which had been used to identify a particular property of an object, such as leaning over to smell some bubble bath, in response to “How did you find out?” We do not know whether the children would have been able to repeat the action had they been asked “What did you just do?”, which might have been more equivalent to our experience questions “Did you/I see all of the strawberry or just a bit of the strawberry?” That is, it is possible that children in O’Neill and Chong’s study failed to encode their source as a source, but nevertheless did encode the relevant experience. If so, it would be inappropriate to draw a parallel with adult amnesic patients who presumably do not lack the relevant abstract understanding of the connection between experience and knowledge.
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Mental health literacy of resettled Iraqi refugees in Australia: knowledge about posttraumatic stress disorder and beliefs about helpfulness of interventions

Mental health literacy of resettled Iraqi refugees in Australia: knowledge about posttraumatic stress disorder and beliefs about helpfulness of interventions

Background: Resettled refugees are a particularly vulnerable group. They have very high levels of mental health problems, in particular, trauma-related disorders, but very low uptake of mental health care. Evidence suggests that poor “ mental health literacy ” , namely, poor knowledge and understanding of the nature and treatment of mental health problems is a major factor in low or inappropriate treatment-seeking among individuals with mental health problems. This study used a culturally adapted Mental Health Literacy Survey method to determine knowledge of, and beliefs about, helpfulness of treatment interventions and providers for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) amongst resettled Iraqi refugees.
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Mental health first aid training for the Chinese community in Melbourne, Australia: effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward people with mental illness

Mental health first aid training for the Chinese community in Melbourne, Australia: effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward people with mental illness

highlighted consistent positive benefits in knowledge, behavior, intentions and attitudes of participants [28]. The benefits of MHFA have been demonstrated in sev- eral studies with the general Australian community. How- ever, there has been limited evaluation with immigrant communities. The only study to date has been an evalua- tion with Vietnamese Australians, which showed improvements in knowledge about mental disorders and reductions in stigmatizing attitudes [29]. There has, as yet, been no evaluation of training carried out in a Chi- nese immigrant community. The aim of this project is to investigate in members of the Chinese community in Melbourne the impact of MHFA training on mental health literacy of the participants' knowledge about appropriate first aid responses and stigmatizing attitudes.
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Knowledge of mental health legislation in Ghana: a case of the use of certificate of urgency in mental health care

Knowledge of mental health legislation in Ghana: a case of the use of certificate of urgency in mental health care

Respondents who were psychiatrists had 9 times more adequate knowledge when it comes to the issuance and related information on Certificate of Urgency than those in other specialties like primary care, obstetrics and gynaecology, surgery and internal medicine. It is impor- tant for the authorities to increase their efforts in organ- izing training programmes to educate and enlighten all health workers within their healthcare facilities on men- tal health legislation in the provision of mental health- care. This has the potential of increasing the knowledge of healthcare providers on mental health issues which will eventually improve their performance. This is impor- tant because it has been reported in Nigeria that the pro- vision of in-service training through the development of strategies for the promotion, prevention, management, treatment and rehabilitation of mental and neurological disorders has improved the performance of healthcare professionals when it comes to management of mental illness [18].
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Improving Educators’ Understanding of Rural Children’s Mental Health

Improving Educators’ Understanding of Rural Children’s Mental Health

communities, including a sustainable train-the-trainers model. The interprofessional development group used their knowledge from implementing and researching a similar, yet lacking program on mental health facilitation for K-12 educators. With development rights to the training, the PI and a colleague (Goforth) are pursuing federal funding with submission in August 2017 to the Institute of Education Sciences: Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning, Goal 2: Development & Innovation grant, E-PROP [2018-085]. Further, the PI is pursuing

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Mental health training program for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, China: effects on knowledge of mental illness and stigma

Mental health training program for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, China: effects on knowledge of mental illness and stigma

Limitation This study does have some limitations. Firstly, we did not follow up the participants given that there will be some confounding factors. For example, some of the participants may participate in other related training, which will make it difficult to confidently explain the changes. Secondly, although contacting people with mental disorders was proved to be an effective strategy for reducing stigmatizing attitude about mental disorder [38], it must be acknowledged that in a traditional country like China, mianzi is significantly meaningful to most Chinese people. So people with mental disorders usually remain hidden from the public [39,40]. Considering these, there are still a wide variety barriers to overcome for people affected by mental disorder or their families to stand out and give a live lecture. Given all the above, we invited a senior psychiatrist to do the lecture instead and made some achievements of combating stigma as well. Thirdly, because most community mental health staff are very busy, we only carried out a one-day training. But it is neces- sary to equip the community mental health staff with more knowledge about mental disorders through some long- term training. Fourthly, the scales used in the study are all self-reported, so we couldn’t avoid if some participants gave certain responses to please the researchers. Lastly, our study is lack of a control group. As this was an initial and uncontrolled study, future similar studies should be de- signed with appropriate control or comparison groups.
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Identifying the understanding of mental illness of mental health care users of mixed ancestry group attending a community mental health clinic

Identifying the understanding of mental illness of mental health care users of mixed ancestry group attending a community mental health clinic

1.9 SUMMARY Understanding attitudes and perceptions is complicated and a difficult task. The manner in which the mental health care users view the world and their interaction there in, determines their outlook on their illness and perhaps it influences their direct involvement in self care. This direct involvement and the need to take responsibility for self care has remained a challenge to health professionals for years. Given the availability of effective medication and psychosocial treatments, studies indicate that adherence to medication by the mental health care users’ remains a challenge due to the different causative perceptions. Health care providers can assist mental health care users to understand their illnesses, and explore the benefits of adhering to medication, by being empowered by themselves to understand the perspective that the mental health care users has towards the dynamics of mental illness, and the predisposing factors contributing to mental illness. The ultimate goal would thus be to improve the disease profiles of mental health care users in the community.
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Knowledge of Mental Health Disorders and Resources by Military Personnel

Knowledge of Mental Health Disorders and Resources by Military Personnel

ABSTRACT With more soldiers returning home to the United States than any war era before, there is a need for research to understand military personnel’s mental health and how they use resources, like the Veteran’s Affairs and non-profit organizations. This study serves to further our understanding about service members’ knowledge on this subject. This study adds to the literature by conducting semi-structured interviews with 15 service members who had deployed on either United States military bases or ships, or peace- keeping missions, overseas after 9/11. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and thoroughly analyzed using a narrative approach. Five important themes emerged from the interviews: prevalence of mental health disorders, knowledge of disorders and resources, barriers to seeking help, types of resources available, and motivations to seek help. Although this study aimed to explicitly understand knowledge, the inductive research process produced four other themes that became pivotal in understanding why active soldiers and veterans were skeptical to seek help.
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Towards an understanding of occupational therapy professional practice knowledge in mental health services

Towards an understanding of occupational therapy professional practice knowledge in mental health services

The decision to send the First Fleet to Australia was the result of complex political, social and economic factors occurring in British society. In-depth consideration of these factors was not the focus of my work, so warranted mention only to the extent that they affected the creation of white Australian settlement. I included an interpretative description of the early penal settlement through the occupational lens described in Chapter One, with a focus on people, the environment and occupations. I was interested in the ways in which people participated in their occupations and the relationship between participation and mental health in the early settlement. To develop my occupational view, I drew on the work of Manning Clark (A short history of Australia, 1995) and for a further critical perspective, the work of Robert Hughes (The fatal shore, 1987). To assist me to consider an environment that can only be imagined from this distance, I also drew on the writing of Watkin Tench (1758–1833), a Captain– Lieutenant with the British Marine Corps who arrived at Port Jackson with the First Fleet. Tench published regular accounts of life in the colony, based on his journal records (1793/2000). While OT services appeared long after the convict period, mental health institutions arising from the time of the early settlements were influenced by the living conditions and the social fabric of early Australia. Occupation in the context of institutional environments emerged from these times and served as a precursor to the development of OT.
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Local peasant knowledge about food: contributions to sovereignty and collective mental health

Local peasant knowledge about food: contributions to sovereignty and collective mental health

Bonino, 2013 INTRODUCCIÓN El artículo que se presenta a continuación es fruto del trabajo conjunto entre la academia y una asociación civil campesina * , cuya alianza ha buscado generar procesos investigativos y de acompañamiento a comunidades de territorios rurales, bajo la premisa de inclusión de un componente participativo-reflexivo, tanto para el hacer académico, como para los procesos propios de la organización campesina. En este trabajo sinérgico, adelantado especialmente en el oriente antioqueño, un foco fundamental de interés ha sido la violencia política, la salud mental y la vida cotidiana, el cual surge con fundamento en dos situaciones relevantes: por un lado, como lo señalara el Centro Nacional de Memoria Histórica en su informe Basta Ya 1 , el campo colombiano ha sido uno de los escenarios permanentes del conflicto armado, generando un impacto severo en términos de desplazamiento forzado, pérdida de territorios y una variedad de secuelas sociales, morales, económicas y culturales sobre la vida campesina, aún desconocidas, a pesar del acumulado de producción investigativa en el país. Por el otro, la correlacionada, tensa y compleja lucha por la reforma agraria en Colombia, cuya historia ha transitado por medidas reformistas, de mercado y/o de despojo, consolida una deuda histórica con las poblaciones y los territorios campesinos, insertos en
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Understanding the mental health effects of street drugs. understanding. the mental health effects of street drugs

Understanding the mental health effects of street drugs. understanding. the mental health effects of street drugs

How can friends and family help? This section is for friends and family who want to help someone they know with a mental health problem who also uses street drugs or alcohol. It may also be useful for anyone concerned that a friend or family member is experiencing mental health problems as a result of taking street drugs. If your friend or relative has mental health problems and also takes street drugs or alcohol, it can be very difficult to know how to help them. If they have severe problems, the reality may be that there is a limit to the amount of support you can give and how much you can get them to change. However, there are some things you can do that might be helpful.
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The nature of mental health nurses' knowledge

The nature of mental health nurses' knowledge

" Factor 2 indicates a `therapeutic subjectivity' in which knowledges proposed as used are those associated with the mental health nurse regimes of practice as a therapeutic [r]

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Mental Health Awareness, Knowledge and Hope

Mental Health Awareness, Knowledge and Hope

• CFE Partnership with Screening for Mental Health CollegeResponse® promotes the prevention, early detection and treatment of prevalent, often under-diagnosed and treatable mental health disorders and alcohol problems through in-person and online screening. For more than a decade, the program has offered affordable and practical risk management tools and information that educate, assess, and connect students with

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School Professionals’ Knowledge and Attitudes About Child Mental Health: Child Diagnosis, Gender, and Ethnicity

School Professionals’ Knowledge and Attitudes About Child Mental Health: Child Diagnosis, Gender, and Ethnicity

presentations while less experienced teachers benefit from improved pre-service or in- service training, resulting in no significant relationship with problem recognition. It is also important to consider the concept that experience can be measured in other ways than number of years in a profession, such as exposure to students with specific symptoms, coursework, or the pursuit of independent learning. Research regarding experience and ADHD coded experience by years and also accounted for the number of students with ADHD taught (Sciutto et al., 2000). In the future, it may be necessary to measure teacher experience in various ways in order to better understand why experience seems relevant to teachers’ problem recognition accuracy in some studies but not others. Additionally, there was no difference in attitudes toward child mental illness between teachers who did and those who did not accurately recognize ADHD. However, hypothesis 9 was partially supported, as the results also suggested that participants who accurately recognized anxiety symptoms had fewer stigmatizing attitudes toward child mental illness than those who were inaccurate. It seems that attitudes, as measured by the ACMHQ, have differing impacts on the recognition of ADHD and GAD. The idea that participants who accurately recognized anxiety symptoms in the vignettes have fewer stigmatizing attitudes about child mental health in general may be related to a greater familiarity with child mental illness or overall mental health literacy. However, no difference in attitudes was found in the case of ADHD recognition. Familiarity with ADHD symptoms within this sample may be fairly widespread, as teachers are commonly well-educated about ADHD. It is
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Understanding the experiences of parents using mental health services

Understanding the experiences of parents using mental health services

There is a commonality between the first three interviews in that children give the participants meaning. It’s not about the joy or status so much as the meaning of being responsible for someone else. I started thinking about the parallel of finding meaning from children, which seems quite clear and strong, and the search for meaning in the diagnosis, which has more multiplicity and at times conflicts in ways that are difficult. In other words, the responsibility and challenge of motherhood doesn’t conflict with the sense of meaning it provides. Psychosis diagnosis, on the other hand, does seem to conflict and feels like the meaning is rarely owned by the participant. It’s something they tolerate, accept, push away or hold in opposition. Analysing this interview felt sometimes challenged by a language barrier. It was difficult to ascertain whether her narrative, or recollection, of events was confused or whether it was the result of her intonation. She was someone who had grown up in an English speaking country (Canada) but referenced specific cultural aspects of muslim and Asian heritage. I was struck by how she was living in a stressful home environment and that it seemed impossible to disentangle it from her experiences of phenomena labelled as psychosis. The psychosis diagnosis seemed to hinge upon that she heard voices shortly after the birth of her daughter. During the interview I found it hard to follow her account and I think there were moments where I didn’t ask for clarification when that may have been useful. I was struck by how this woman wanted to establish a role and identify that transcended the meanings of womanhood and motherhood that she attributed to her cultural background and that were being reinforced by her husband and mother-in-law. I was struck by how she didn’t articulate the experiences of motherhood and psychosis diagnosis as two interacting aspects of her life. It made me wonder if that’s a dichotomy that I’m bringing.
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