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REVIEW OF MANAGEMENT MEASURES FOR LAKE CHILWA, MALAWI ABSTRACT

REVIEW OF MANAGEMENT MEASURES FOR LAKE CHILWA, MALAWI ABSTRACT

There is a need to review the current regulations governing exploitation of the fishery especially matemba. Based on the previous studies and the biology of matemba, it is increasingly becoming theoretical to assume that overfishing could be experienced in Lake Chilwa. The way forward is to carry out experimental fishing studies with matemba seines during the rainy season when the seining operations are closed and estimate catch per unit of effort. Results from such studies may recommend reduction of the length of the closed season, which is currently 4 months. It may also be suitable to estimate biomass of the fishery by conducting trawling surveys as those conducted by Ratcliffe (1971). There is need to check setting of the fish traps to avoid targeting spawning stocks of matemba when they migrate up or down streams. The closed season for riverine fishing needs to be checked to match with the breeding patterns of matemba. The gillnet meshes should be enforced to allow for recovery of makumba or chambo and this can be reviewed when considered appropriate.
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Physiochemical Properties of Soil in Selected Sites of the Lake Chilwa Basin after 5 years of Conservation Agriculture Practice

Physiochemical Properties of Soil in Selected Sites of the Lake Chilwa Basin after 5 years of Conservation Agriculture Practice

EPAs within the Lake Chilwa basin. Physically, improvements have been observed in bulk density through overall reduction in soil bulk density mean for all the seven (7) EPAs after 5years of CA practice. Chemically, soil pH generally dropped in all the 7 EPAs after 5 years of CA implementation such that the soils can be said to be slightly acidic and still tolerable for agricultural production. It was observed that there is an increase in SOM status in all the EPAs under study except Domasi and Naminjiwa EPAs which recorded slight declines. It was further observed that the gains and losses in SOM did not correspondingly translate into increases and decreases respectively of nitrogen in the EPAs under observation. Nonetheless, Nsanama, Tamani and Ngwelero EPAs showed an increase in nitrogen and correspondingly had SOM gains over the years; Kasongo and Malosa EPAs recorded a decline in nitrogen status even though they had made gains in SOM. Soil carbon status showed to be increasing in Malosa, Kasongo, Nsanama, Tamani and Ngwelero EPAs as expected, considering that carbon is a key ingredient of SOM. Correspondingly, soil carbon decreased in Domasi and Naminjiwa EPAs where SOM was observed to be declining. Results on soil phosphorus status in all the EPAs under study show a decline except in Ngwelero EPA where an increase was recorded after 5 years of CA implementation. Similarly, there was a decline in potassium status in all the EPAs under study except in Malosa where it remained static, 5 years after CA implementation. It is feared that the flooding events in the fifth year of CA implementation may have had an effect on the chemical status of the soil in the EPAs under study due to the resultant nutrient leaching. It is thus expected that the soil may recover under continued CA practice as long as extreme rainfall do not lead to field water logging conditions.
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Vulnerability to climate change and adaptation strategies of local communities in Malawi: experiences of women fish-processing groups in the Lake Chilwa Basin

Vulnerability to climate change and adaptation strategies of local communities in Malawi: experiences of women fish-processing groups in the Lake Chilwa Basin

The purpose of this article is to better understand human– environment interactions, bearing in mind their complex- ity, more specifically climate change adaptation and its lim- itations. By taking the example of Lake Chilwa Basin in Malawi, this article asks the following research questions. To what extent have women in Lake Chilwa Basin perceived changes in the climate, what have they experienced and how have they been affected by it? To what extent do local cli- mate change adaptation projects increase the women’s adap- tive capacity? Evidence is drawn from a case study of the Lake Chilwa Basin Climate Change Adaptation Programme (LCBCCAP) and its women fish-processing groups (WF- PGs). Most important, this article demonstrates that some adaptation strategies have limitations and are not suited to cope with a warmer and more variable climate. Research on limitations of climate change adaptation is in its infancy, and this study contributes to this body of research with presenting novel empirical material on southern Malawi, a region that is very poor, densely populated, and prone to climate variabil- ity threatening local livelihoods. The study concludes that in- come diversification can build resilience to climate change.
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ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABILITY, EFFORT DEVELOPMENT AND THE REGENERATIVE CAPACITY OF THE FISH STOCKS IN LAKE CHILWA, MALAWI. P.A.M. van Zwieten and F.

ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABILITY, EFFORT DEVELOPMENT AND THE REGENERATIVE CAPACITY OF THE FISH STOCKS IN LAKE CHILWA, MALAWI. P.A.M. van Zwieten and F.

• Changing water levels are reflected in an “immediate” effect on catch-rates in the various gears employed, which means that the effect is on the stock abundance. The time lag in the correlation between water levels and catch-rates is generally short (0-1 year) and long-term effects caused by strong or weak cohorts (year classes) of fish over several years, are not detected – except possibly with Clarias. Since most of the variation is accounted for within the “first year” this indicates that the fishing pattern is aimed at small short-lived, or young fish. However, despite the high effort, this fishing pattern does not seem to influence the regenerative capacity of the stock, as this seems to be more a function of water levels. In other words, when the environmental conditions are favorable (strong water influx) the recruitment of new fish could be independent of the fishing pressure, at least within the present range of observations. That the recruitment appears much more dependent on favorable environmental conditions, than on the actual parent stock sizes, is also manifested by the rapid rebuilding of the stocks that is observed after each major lake level recession. The Lake Chilwa fish stocks appear to be adapted to withstand high natural depletions, and are therefore also able to sustain high exploitation rates.
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Delivery cost analysis of a reactive mass cholera vaccination campaign: a case study of Shanchol™ vaccine use in Lake Chilwa, Malawi

Delivery cost analysis of a reactive mass cholera vaccination campaign: a case study of Shanchol™ vaccine use in Lake Chilwa, Malawi

Background: Cholera is a diarrheal disease that produces rapid dehydration. The infection is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity. Oral cholera vaccine (OCV) has been propagated for the prevention of cholera. Evidence on OCV delivery cost is insufficient in the African context. This study aims to analyze Shanchol vaccine delivery costs, focusing on the vaccination campaign in response of a cholera outbreak in Lake Chilwa, Malawi. Methods: The vaccination campaign was implemented in two rounds in February and March 2016. Structured questionnaires were used to collect costs incurred for each vaccination related activity, including vaccine procurement and shipment, training, microplanning, sensitization, social mobilization and vaccination rounds. Costs collected, including financial and economic costs were analyzed using Choltool, a standardized cholera cost calculator.
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The lake Chilwa fishing household strategies in response to water level changes: migration, conflicts and co-management

The lake Chilwa fishing household strategies in response to water level changes: migration, conflicts and co-management

115 just involves changing the smaller meshed panel on the bunt while the converse involved a complete change of the net. Additionally, it was easy for Lake Malombe fishers to operate on Lake Chilwa. A group of gillnet fishers at Mposa explained: “It needs a skilled person to dive under water to tie the footrope of Nkacha seine.” They also claimed that the in-migrant seine fishers always operate their gears on full-time basis, thus, operating even during November-March rainy season, a period when catching of juvenile Matemba is common in open waters. The conflicts arise due to the introduction of new fishing practices and between resident or local fishers and in-migrant fishers. Warner (2000) argued that a combination of demographic change through migration and the limits to sustainable harvesting of the natural resources including fishers are the underlying cause of conflict over the utilisation of the natural resources. On Lake Chilwa, conflicts of this nature are common usually from full-time fishing operations by seine operators, usually over eight months of fishing within a year. This explains a direct impact of conflicts on co-management strength, which can be either positive or negative. It can be positive where conflicts result in improved access to natural resources by artisanal fishers but can be negative where it blocks access to fishing areas with underutilised fisheries resources. 5.4 Overfishing issue
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Conflicts over Natural Resource Scarcity in the Aquatic Ecosystem of the Lake Chilwa

Conflicts over Natural Resource Scarcity in the Aquatic Ecosystem of the Lake Chilwa

The main food and income coping strategy of the people at Chisi Island during the recession was bird hunting from protected sites. It was reported by local bird hunters that the average catch per hunter had increased from two birds per week during normal years to over 50 birds a day. This catch magnitude was against the by-laws on sustainable bird hunting established by the BHA. The birds were smoked and sold in Zomba City and other places. Findings from the study showed that prices for both the local and urban markets for each bird increased from MWK 50 (US$ 0.15) to as high as MWK3000 (US$ 9), from the period January to December 2012. The most typical birds that people consumed were common moorhen (Gallinula chloripa), locally known as Nkhutuwiri while those preferred by customers in Zomba were whistling ducks (Chipiyo). Bhima [18] estimates that bird hunting increases by 300 - 500 percent during times of low water levels because it provides important sources of food and income to vulnerable and marginal communities. Bhima estimates that approximately 460 bird hunters trap 1.2 million birds every year from the Lake Chilwa area. Conflicts on coping strategies between migrants and local residents during the 2012 Lake Chilwa recession
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Walloon Lake Association Walloon Lake Rental Listing 2020

Walloon Lake Association Walloon Lake Rental Listing 2020

5856 Howard Road The West Wind cottage with breathtaking sunsets located on the famed north arm of Walloon lake with a hard sand bottom. Cottage is conveniently located close to Petoskey, Walloon Village, Boyne City and Boyne Falls. Cottage sleeps 14 in beds plus a queen size pull out couch. The cottage has both covered and uncovered porches and decks as well as a sunroom, 3 bathrooms, an outdoor shower, three fireplaces, a large dining area and a wonderful living room to relax after a hard day of playing. The cottage is located on a meticulously maintained private lot with a beautiful beach area for the kids to play and a dock for your toys.
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Status of Lake Whitefish (Coregonus Clupeaformis) in Lake Champlain, 2006-2010

Status of Lake Whitefish (Coregonus Clupeaformis) in Lake Champlain, 2006-2010

Juvenile and adult whitefish were sampled in the fall of 2006-2008 and year- round during 2009-2010 in the main lake near Proctor Shoal (Figure 2.1). Sampling of adult fish was also conducted in Missisquoi Bay and Larabee’s Point in the spring and fall of 2009. Whitefish were collected using a 7.6-m semi-balloon otter trawl with a 6.4- mm stretched-mesh cod-end liner and a chain footrope, primarily targeting juveniles, and bottom-set gill-nets to capture adults. Gill nets were 1.8 m deep and 70.6 to 152.4 m long, and included panels of 7.6, 8.9, 10.2, 11.4, 12.7, 14, and 15.2 cm stretch mesh; we did not use standardized nets due to low catches per net (mean = 2.2 fish/net) and a paucity of historic data for relative CPUE comparisons. Whitefish were weighed (nearest g), measured (total length ± 1 mm), and examined internally for sex determination. A scale sample was taken from above the lateral line, and otoliths were extracted and stored in labeled envelopes for age estimation; ovaries were removed from females collected in the fall leading up to spawning activity (October-December) during 2006-2009 to estimate fecundity.
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Limnological studies of a famous himalayan lake: the dal lake (srinagar, india)

Limnological studies of a famous himalayan lake: the dal lake (srinagar, india)

289.75±32.95 µS throughout the study period of one year in 2009. The electric conductivity of water depends on the concentration of ions and its nutrient status. The higher conductivity values may be due decomposition of organic matter, accumulation of ions owing to evaporation, biological turnover and interaction with sediments (Devi and Anandhi, 2009). Shastree et al. (1991) also reported that high level of conductivity reflects the pollution status as well as trophic levels of the lake.

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A paleomagnetic study of the Lynn Lake and Fraser Lake Gabbros, Northern Manitoba.

A paleomagnetic study of the Lynn Lake and Fraser Lake Gabbros, Northern Manitoba.

disconcordantly intruded the Lynn Lake Rhyolite of the Wasekwan Group (Milligan 1960). This plug has also been cut by two major reverse faults (Figure 5) (Vellet 1963). The upper fault trends N 45 W and dips 35 NE. This Is about the same as the Lynn Lake fault of the "A" plug, thereby indicating that it may-be an extension (Plnsent 1977). This upper fault also cuts the main ore body in the "EL" plug, as the upper fault of the "A" plug cuts into its ore bodies (Vellet 1963). The lower fault also trends N 45° W but dips 60° to 80° N and again cuts the ore bodies In the "EL” plug. A series of small EW faults also cut the ore bodies between the main upper and lower faults.
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Lake Taupo Protection Trust. Protecting the water quality of Lake Taupo

Lake Taupo Protection Trust. Protecting the water quality of Lake Taupo

LTPT - a Charitable Trust formed with a fund of $81.5 million to help protect the water quality of Lake Taupo.. LTPT role supports the protection of Lake Taupo through.[r]

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HYDROGRAPHIC, HYDROCHIMIC DYNAMICS OF THE LAKE SYSTEM OF THE BASIN OF LAKE-FITRI

HYDROGRAPHIC, HYDROCHIMIC DYNAMICS OF THE LAKE SYSTEM OF THE BASIN OF LAKE-FITRI

pollution. Moreover, of the follow-ups and controls of the variation of the subsoil water level in the various works and of the its affluent and river (Batha river) were made during the period going from 19 to September 30 of the year 2017.The physicochemical parameters (pH, temperature and electric conductivity) were carried out in situ with the balanced made up sample and a probe multi-parameter WTW. The samples were taken in plastic bottles (1,5 liters) extremely clean and rinsed 3 times with water to analyze. For manual pump drilling, a pumping long enough was carried out to rinse the suction pipes. Then, the samples were filled and closed hermetically in water to avoid the bubbles of air in the bottle which could support the outburst of certain gases dissolved in water. All these samples were preserved cold then conveyed at the National Laboratory of Water (LNE) of the ministry for the breeding and hydraulics for the chemical analysis. However, the analysis of the hydrological data of the catchment area was proceeded and made it possible to arise an equation of a hydrological assessment. Consequently, the data collected in this basin caused interrogations on the variation of the lake, its food (precipitation, evaporation and infiltration) and on its dynamics current and passed. I.4. Data processing
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Conservation on Lake  A Case Study on Katraj Lake Pune, Maharashtra

Conservation on Lake A Case Study on Katraj Lake Pune, Maharashtra

6) Need to place aerators in Katraj Lake-: The phenomenon of fish death is common but in the recent years the fish death are increasing day by day the present situation is lead towards the extinct conditions of fish this was the main reason behind the decrease in dissolved oxygen (DO) of lake water an increase in BOD level. There is a need to place aerators in Katraj Lake so that the lake community will health otherwise the whole community gets disturbed. 7) Plantation of trees around the Katraj Lake- The plantation of trees around the lake may help to control the soil erosion this can be done by the zoo authorities’ members. Lake was degraded day by day due to the lack of oxygen caused by the pollution in water. The Pune Municipal Corporation has requested to allot the plantation of trees around the Katraj Lake and the data of every six months plantation must be recorded
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Duck Lake Duck Lake Association Town of Conquest Cayuga County

Duck Lake Duck Lake Association Town of Conquest Cayuga County

The next section contains some watershed characteristics including the watershed area in acres and hectares and the land use composition of the watershed. A watershed is the entire area that will drain to a particular lake and is constrained by the topology and hydrology of the land. The watershed area was calculated by the US Geological Survey “StreamStats” program. This area map was then used to calculate land uses from the most recent (2011) National Land Use Cover data on the NYSDEC ArcGIS mapping program. The map itself is shown on the left side of the front page. In general, blue colors show water, green and light brown show forested or shrub land, yellow and dark brown are agriculture, and pink to red is developed land.The program participation section lists the years the lake has been sampled through CSLAP and the names of the 2016 samplers.
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Lake Superior Summer Creel Fishing Report The Lake Superior summer

Lake Superior Summer Creel Fishing Report The Lake Superior summer

Upper Shore – Twin Points to Hovland: Angler pressure has been moderate to heavy from most stations when weather conditions have allowed. Upper shore anglers experienced some near shore cold water conditions following storms and strong northwest winds early in the reporting period. While near shore waters have recovered some warmth, many areas were in the low to mid forty degree range, especially further up the shore from Taconite Harbor and to Hovland. Surface waters were generally warmer further from shore, warming to the low to mid sixty degree range the further one travels from shore, and sometimes having to go a few miles out before warmer temperatures can be detected. Anglers report good fishing for Lake Trout from most stations, averaging about a fish per angler in the Upper Shore stations. Many Lake Trout were in the 15-20 inch range as well as a few larger fish in the ten pound class. Lake trout have been generally scattered both in deep water and also near the surface in near shore waters. Anglers have reported fair numbers of Coho Salmon from most stations. Coho Salmon were 20-23 inches long and 2-3 pounds. Reports of Chinook Salmon reports remain low, although a few larger fish, up to eight pounds, have been reported. Anglers from all stations continue to report hard fighting steelhead in the 25-28 inch range with most of these fish hooked near the surface.
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Lake Superior Summer Creel Fishing Report The Lake Superior summer

Lake Superior Summer Creel Fishing Report The Lake Superior summer

Fishing pressure and catches were good this past week from the Duluth area and light from McQuade Harbor to Two Harbors. The weather varied considerably, having cooled down and become windy in recent days. The unsettled weather will probably create more consistent temperatures in the water column and also create mud-lines in places. The Lake Trout continue to bit on spoons, flashers + flies and meat, all trolled either near the thermocline, which is 40 to 60 feet deep, and down all the way to 180 feet. Pink, green, and purple were good colors, as was a green, white, and orange combination. The fish are average size, 17- 25 inches long, except for a couple of larger fish here and there. The clerk measured one 35 inch fish that weighed 14.5 pounds. Anglers caught very few Coho Salmon and just a few Chinook Salmon. The Chinooks were caught in the same places as the Lake Trout. Anglers did not report catching Siscowet this week. Upper Shore – Twin Points to Hovland:
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Lake Erie / Lake St. Clair Citizens Fishery Advisory Committee

Lake Erie / Lake St. Clair Citizens Fishery Advisory Committee

It was also noted that the Lake St. Clair Research Station annually updates the “Status of the Fisheries in Michigan Waters of Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair.” This special report provides a summary of the results of previous years survey efforts and fishery forecasts for the current year. This report is available at: http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10364_52259_10951_11304---,00.html

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Lake Rotokakahi: The kakahi (Hyridella menziesi) in a general framework of lake health.

Lake Rotokakahi: The kakahi (Hyridella menziesi) in a general framework of lake health.

60 During times of European settlement Kaiteriria on the southern lake shore was another prominent occupancy. During the mid 1800s this was the position of the armed constabulary. A group of Te Arawa warriors formed to protect Rotorua from Te Kooti a highly respected warrior in New Zealand and his invading war party during the period of the Maori land wars. Kaiteriria from a protective point of view was excellent, being close to the main Rotorua-Taupo highway and far enough South of Rotorua to prevent any invasion, as it was known that Te Kooti would be traveling from the Urewera Ranges. A road was built along the southern shores of Lake Rotokakahi linking Kaiteriria with Epeha and the main Tarawera- Rotorua road to provide easier passage to Te Wairoa village at Tarawera. Epeha in close vicinity to Kaiteriria was where one of the first Christian missionaries to Rotorua was set up by Thomas Chapman. Here a church was built along with quite a number of houses and a bakery or flour mill. A stone structure, possibly a baker’s oven, still remains at Epeha. In 1822 many Ngapuhi warriors were killed on Motutawa Island by the resident people as an act of vengeance for relatives killed by the same Ngapuhi warriors in Te Totara, Thames. In turn, this prompted Hongi Hika, a feared warrior chief of Ngapuhi, to attack Rotorua the following year resulting in the massacre of more than 170 Te Arawa people.
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DIAMOND VALLEY LAKE AND LAKE SKINNER RECREATION AREA RULES AND REGULATIONS

DIAMOND VALLEY LAKE AND LAKE SKINNER RECREATION AREA RULES AND REGULATIONS

The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, a public agency within the State of California, adopts the following rules and regulations applicab le to the Diamond Valley Lake (DVL) and Lake Skinner Recreation Area pursuant to California Health & Safety Code section 117060 after finding and determining them necessary:

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